Best of
19th-Century

2011

Montana Marriages Trilogy


Mary Connealy - 2011
    One volume encases three acclaimed novels by Mary Connealy.Montana Rose—Readers will laugh and cry along with Cassie Griffin, the vulnerable pregnant widow;The Husband Tree—Belle Tanner, the tough as nails ranch woman who has buried three husbands;Wildflower Bride—Abby Lind, who was raised and then rejected by the Flathead Indians has to find her way in a white world she doesn't understand.

The Complete Vampire Chronicles 12-Book Bundle


Anne Rice - 2011
    But that’s only the beginning. Over the course of twelve interwoven novels, Rice crafts a richly imagined, magnificently transporting epic around her chilling, charismatic antihero, Lestat. An aristocrat in the heady days of pre-revolutionary France who lives to become a rock star in the demonic, shimmering 1980s, Lestat rushes through the centuries in search of others like him, seeking answers to the mystery of his eternal, terrifying existence.   Now, with the publication of the complete series in one convenient eBook bundle, there has never been a better time to devour the entirety of The Vampire Chronicles. Gathered here are the ten books that comprise the original saga: INTERVIEW WITH THE VAMPIRETHE VAMPIRE LESTATQUEEN OF THE DAMNEDTHE TALE OF THE BODY THIEFMEMNOCH THE DEVILTHE VAMPIRE ARMANDMERRICKBLOOD AND GOLDBLACKWOOD FARMBLOOD CANTICLE  . . . as well as the two books of the New Tales of the Vampires:  PANDORAVITTORIO, THE VAMPIRE  Praise for the novels of Anne Rice   “Brilliant . . . [Rice’s] undead characters are utterly alive.”—The New York Times Book Review   “If you surrender and go with her . . . you have surrendered to enchantment, as in a voluptuous dream.”—The Boston Globe   “Frightening, sensual . . . Anne Rice will live on through the ages of literature. . . . To read her is to become giddy as if spinning through the mind of time, to become lightheaded as if our blood is slowly being drained away.”—San Francisco Chronicle   “Unrelentingly erotic . . . sometimes beautiful, and always unforgettable.”—The Washington Post   “Rice has created universes within universes, traveling back in time as far as ancient, pre-pyramidic Egypt and journeying from the frozen mountain peaks of Nepal to the crowded, sweating streets of southern Florida.”—Los Angeles Times   “Fiercely ambitious, nothing less than a complete unnatural history of vampires.”—The Village Voice

All Different Kinds of Free


Jessica McCann - 2011
    One frigid night in Pennsylvania, that changed forever. They tore her family apart. They put her in chains. They never expected her to fight back. In 1837, Margaret Morgan was kidnapped from her home in Pennsylvania and sold into slavery. The state of Pennsylvania charged her kidnapper with the crime, but the conviction was later overturned by the U.S. Supreme Court. It was the first time a major branch of the federal government had made a pro-slavery stand, and the ruling in Prigg v. Pennsylvania sewed the bitter seeds of the states' rights battle that eventually would lead to the Civil War. Yet, the heart of this story is not a historic Supreme Court ruling. It is the remarkable, unforgettable Margaret Morgan. Her life would never be the same. Her family had been torn apart. Uncaring forces abused her body and her heart. But she refused to give up, refused to stop fighting, refused to allow her soul to be enslaved.

Genius of Place: The Life of Frederick Law Olmsted


Justin Martin - 2011
    Best remembered for his landscape architecture, from New York's Central Park to Boston's Emerald Necklace to Stanford University's campus, Olmsted was also an influential journalist, early voice for the environment, and abolitionist credited with helping dissuade England from joining the South in the Civil War. This momentous career was shadowed by a tragic personal life, also fully portrayed here.Most of all, he was a social reformer. He didn't simply create places that were beautiful in the abstract. An awesome and timeless intent stands behind Olmsted's designs, allowing his work to survive to the present day. With our urgent need to revitalize cities and a widespread yearning for green space, his work is more relevant now than it was during his lifetime. Justin Martin restores Olmsted to his rightful place in the pantheon of great Americans.

The Churchills


Mary S. Lovell - 2011
    Succeeding generations of Churchills sometimes achieved distinction but also included profligates and womanizers, and were saddled with the ruinous upkeep of Blenheim. The family fortunes were revived in the nineteenth century by the huge dowries of New York society beauties Jennie Jerome (Winston's mother) and Consuelo Vanderbilt (wife to Winston's cousin).Mary S. Lovell brilliantly recounts the triumphant political and military campaigns, the construction of great houses, the domestic tragedies, and the happy marriage of Winston to Clementine Hosier set against the disastrous unions of most of his family, which ended in venereal disease, papal annulment, clinical depression, and adultery.The Churchills were an extraordinary family: ambitious, impecunious, impulsive, brave, and arrogant. Winston—recently voted "The Greatest Briton"—dominates them all. His failures and triumphs are revealed in the context of a poignant and sometimes tragic private life.

Pierre Berton's War of 1812


Pierre Berton - 2011
    The Invasion of Canada is a remarkable account of the war's first year and the events that led up to it; Pierre Berton transforms history into an engrossing narrative that reads like a fast-paced novel. Drawing on personal memoirs and diaries as well as official dispatches, the author has been able to get inside the characters of the men who fought the war - the common soldiers as well as the generals, the bureaucrats and the profiteers, the traitors and the loyalists. The Canada-U.S. border was in flames as the War of 1812 continued. York's parliament buildings were on fire, Niagara-on-the-Lake burned to the ground and Buffalo lay in ashes. Even the American capital of Washington, far to the south, was put to the torch. The War of 1812 had become one of the nineteenth century's bloodiest struggles.Flames Across the Border is a compelling evocation of war at its most primeval - the muddy fields, the frozen forests and the ominous waters where men fought and died. Pierre Berton skilfully captures the courage, determination and terror of the universal soldier, giving new dimension and fresh perspective to this early conflict between the two emerging nations of North America.

The Last Pre-Raphaelite: Edward Burne-Jones and the Victorian Imagination


Fiona MacCarthy - 2011
    The angels on our Christmas cards, the stained glass in our churches, the great paintings in our galleries - Edward Burne-Jones's work is all around us. The most admired British artist of his generation, he was a leading figure with Oscar Wilde in the aesthetic movement of the 1880s, inventing what became a widespread 'Burne-Jones look'. The bridge between Victorian and modern art, he influenced not just his immediate circle but artists such as Klimt and Picasso. In this gripping book Fiona MacCarthy explores and re-evaluates his art and life - his battle against vicious public hostility, the romantic susceptibility to female beauty that would inspire his art and ruin his marriage, his ill health and depressive sensibility, the devastating rift with his great friend and collaborator William Morris as their views on art and politics diverged. With new research and fresh historical perspective, The Last Pre-Raphaelite tells the extraordinary, dramatic story of Burne-Jones as an artist, a key figure in Victorian society and a peculiarly captivating man.

Racial Innocence: Performing American Childhood from Slavery to Civil Rights


Robin Bernstein - 2011
    As the idea of childhood innocence took hold, it became racialized: popular culture constructed white children as innocent and vulnerable while excluding black youth from these qualities. Actors, writers, and visual artists then began pairing white children with African American adults and children, thus transferring the quality of innocence to a variety of racial-political projects—a dynamic that Robin Bernstein calls “racial innocence.” This phenomenon informed racial formation from the mid-19th century through the early 20th century.Racial Innocence takes up a rich archive including books, toys, theatrical props, and domestic knickknacks which Bernstein analyzes as “scriptive things” that invite or prompt historically located practices while allowing for resistance and social improvisation. Integrating performance studies with literary and visual analysis, Bernstein offers singular readings of theatrical productions, from blackface minstrelsy to Uncle Tom’s Cabin to The Wonderful Wizard of Oz; literary works by Joel Chandler Harris, Harriet Wilson, and Frances Hodgson Burnett; material culture including Topsy pincushions, Uncle Tom and Little Eva handkerchiefs, and Raggedy Ann dolls; and visual texts ranging from fine portraiture to advertisements for lard substitute. Throughout, Bernstein shows how “innocence” gradually became the exclusive province of white children—until the Civil Rights Movement succeeded not only in legally desegregating public spaces, but in culturally desegregating the concept of childhood itself.Writing in Children’s Literature, Philip Nel notes that Racial Innocence is “one of those rare books that shifts the paradigm—a book that, in years to come, will be recognized as a landmark in children’s literature and childhood studies.” In the journal Cultural Studies, reviewer Aaron C. Thomas says that Bernstein’s “theory of the scriptive thing asks us to see children as active participants in culture, and, in fact, as expert agents of the culture of childhood into which they have been interpellated. In this way, Bernstein is able not only to describe the effects of 19th-century radicalization on 21st century US culture, but also to illuminate the radicalized residues of our own childhoods in our everyday adult lives.” Racial Innocence was awarded the 2012 Outstanding Book Award from the Association for Theatre in Higher Education, and the award committee noted that the book “is a historiographic tour de force that traces a genealogy of the invention of the innocent (white) child and its racialized roots in 19th and 20th century U.S. popular culture.”

Complete Works of Wilkie Collins


Wilkie Collins - 2011
    This is the COMPLETE WORKS of Wilkie Collins, with every novel, short story - even the very rare ones – published play, non-fiction text and much, much more. Now you can truly own all of Collins’ works on your Kindle, and all in ONE well-organised file.Please note: we aim to provide the most comprehensive author collections available to Kindle readers. Sadly, it’s not always possible to guarantee an absolutely ‘complete’ works, due to copyright restrictions or the scarcity of minor works. However, we do ensure our customers that every possible major text and a wealth of other material are included. We are dedicated to developing and enhancing our eBooks, which are available as free updates for customers who have already purchased them.CONTENTSThe NovelsANTONINABASILHIDE AND SEEKTHE DEAD SECRETA ROGUE'S LIFETHE WOMAN IN WHITENO NAMEARMADALETHE MOONSTONEMAN AND WIFEPOOR MISS FINCHTHE NEW MAGDALENTHE LAW AND THE LADYTHE TWO DESTINIESTHE FALLEN LEAVESJEZEBEL’S DAUGHTERTHE BLACK ROBEHEART AND SCIENCE"I SAY NO"THE EVIL GENIUSGUILTY RIVERTHE LEGACY OF CAINBLIND LOVEThe Novellas and Shorter FictionOVER 40 TITLES AND THREE SHORT STORY COLLECTIONSThe PlaysNO NAMETHE FROZEN DEEPNO THOROUGHFAREBLACK AND WHITENO NAME:THE WOMAN IN WHITETHE NEW MAGDALENMISS GWILTTHE MOONSTONEThe Non-FictionMEMOIRS OF THE LIFE OF WILLIAM COLLINS ESQ., R.A.RAMBLES BEYOND RAILWAYSA PICTORIAL TOUR TO ST. GEORGE BOSHERVILLE.THE EXHIBITION OF THE ROYAL ACADEMYCONSIDERATIONS ON THE COPYRIGHT QUESTIONMAGNETIC EVENINGS AT HOMEBOOKS NECESSARY FOR A LIBERAL EDUCATIONHOW I WRITE MY BOOKSREMINISCENCES OF A STORY-TELLERTHE CRUISE OF THE TOMTITTHE NATIONAL GALLERY AND THE OLD MASTERSA FAIR PENITENTTHE DEBTOR'S BEST FRIENDDEEP DESIGN ON SOCIETYTHE LITTLE HUGUENOTTHANKS TO DOCTOR LIVINGSTONESERMON FOR SEPOYSDRAMATIC GRUB

From Splendor to Revolution: The Romanov Women, 1847--1928


Julia P. Gelardi - 2011
    During that time the country underwent a massive transformation, taking it from days of grandeur under the tsars to the chaos of revolution and the beginnings of the Soviet Union.At the center of all this tumult were four women of the Romanov dynasty. Marie Alexandrovna and Olga Constantinovna were born into the family, Russian Grand Duchesses at birth. Marie Feodorovna and Marie Pavlovna married into the dynasty, the former born a Princess of Denmark, the latter a Duchess of the German duchy of Mecklendburg-Schwerin.In From Splendor to Revolution, we watch these pampered aristocratic women fight for their lives as the cataclysm of war engulfs them. In a matter of a few short years, they fell from the pinnacle of wealth and power to the depths of danger, poverty, and exile. It is an unforgettable epic story.

Charles Dickens and the Street Children of London


Andrea Warren - 2011
    After his family went into debt and he found himself working at a shoe-polish factory, Dickens soon realized that the members of the lower class were no different than he, and, even worse, they were given no chance to better themselves. It was then that he decided to use his greatest talent, his writing ability, to tell the stories of those who had no voice.

Papa Panov's Special Christmas


Leo Tolstoy - 2011
    In a dream on Christmas Eve, he's promised that his wish will come true, but he must watch carefully. What follows is Papa Panov's most joyful Christmas as he learns that the best way to celebrate the Savior's birth is by following His example.

Charles Dickens: The Dickens Bicentenary 1812-2012


Lucinda Hawksley - 2011
    Produced in association with the Charles Dickens Museum, London, it follows Dickens from early childhood, including his time spent as a child labourer, and looks at how he became the greatest celebrity of his age, and how he still remains one of Britain’s most renowned literary figures, even in the twenty-first century. It is an intimate look at what he was like as a husband, father, friend and employer; at his longing to be an actor, his travels across North America, his year spent living in Italy and his great love of France. It introduces Dickens’s fascinating family and his astonishing circle of friends, and we discover when and how life and real-life personalities were imitated in his art.Charles Dickens was an intriguing personality. He was a man far ahead of his time, a Victorian whose ideals and outlook on life were better suited to the modern world. With beautiful photographs and artworks, and many never before seen facsimile documents from Dickens’s own archives, Charles Dickens brings to life this extraordinary and complex man, whose name remains internationally revered and whose work continues to inspire us today.

Journey to the Abyss: The Diaries of Count Harry Kessler, 1880-1918


Harry Graf Kessler - 2011
    Kessler’s immersion in the new art and literature of Paris, London, and Berlin unfolds in the first part of the diaries. This refined world gives way to vivid descriptions of the horrific fighting on the Eastern and Western fronts of World War I, the intriguing private discussions among the German political and military elite about the progress of the war, as well as Kessler’s account of his role as a diplomat with a secret mission in Switzerland.   Profoundly modern and often prescient, Kessler was an erudite cultural impresario and catalyst who as a cofounder of the avant-garde journal Pan met and contributed articles about many of the leading artists and writers of the day. In 1903 he became director of the Grand Ducal Museum of Arts and Crafts in Weimar, determined to make it a center of aesthetic modernism together with his friend the architect Henry van de Velde, whose school of design would eventually become the Bauhaus. When a public scandal forced his resignation in 1906, Kessler turned to other projects, including collaborating with the Austrian writer Hugo von Hofmannsthal and the German composer Richard Strauss on the opera Der Rosenkavalier and the ballet The Legend of Joseph, which was performed in 1914 by the Ballets Russes in London and Paris. In 1913 he founded the Cranach-Presse in Weimar, one of the most important private presses of the twentieth century.   The diaries present brilliant, sharply etched, and often richly comical descriptions of his encounters, conversations, and creative collaborations with some of the most celebrated people of his time: Otto von Bismarck, Paul von Hindenburg, Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Richard Strauss, Igor Stravinsky, Sergei Diaghilev, Vaslav Nijinsky, Isadora Duncan, Ruth St. Denis, Sarah Bernhardt, Friedrich Nietzsche, Rainer Marie Rilke, Paul Verlaine, Gordon Craig, George Bernard Shaw, Harley Granville-Barker, Max Klinger, Arnold Böcklin, Max Beckmann, Aristide Maillol, Auguste Rodin, Edgar Degas, Éduard Vuillard, Claude Monet, Edvard Munch, Ida Rubinstein, Gabriele D’Annunzio, Pierre Bonnard, and Walther Rathenau, among others.   Remarkably insightful, poignant, and cinematic in their scope, Kessler’s diaries are an invaluable record of one of the most volatile and seminal moments in modern Western history.

The Brothers Karamazov / The Possessed (With Active Table of Contents)


Fyodor Dostoyevsky - 2011
    With the embittered voice of the anonymous "underground man", Dostoyevsky wrote Notes from Underground (1864), which has been called the "best overture for existentialism ever written" by Walter Kaufmann. He is often acknowledged by critics as one of the greatest and most prominent psychologists in world literature.

Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves Mississippi Narratives


Work Projects Administration - 2011
    You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

Figuring Out Fibromyalgia: Current Science and the Most Effective Treatments


Ginevra Liptan - 2011
    Huge progress in research over the past decade has established dysfunction in sleep, pain, and the stress response in fibromyalgia. Current research suggests that the muscle pain of fibromyalgia may be generated from the fascia, the connective tissue surrounding each muscle of the body.As medical understanding of fibromyalgia has increased, so have our treatment options. With the unique perspective of a physician studying fibromyalgia “from the inside,” Dr. Liptan explains the most up-to-date science and guides you to the most effective treatments from both conventional and alternative medicine.ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Ginevra Liptan, MD, is a graduate of Tufts University School of Medicine, and is board-certified in internal medicine. After developing fibromyalgia as a medical student, she spent many years using herself as a guinea pig in a search for effective treatments. She is now medical director of the Frida Center for Fibromyalgia, and an associate professor at Oregon Health and Science University.

Empires, Nations, and Families: A History of the North American West, 1800-1860


Anne F. Hyde - 2011
    This was not, as Empires, Nations, and Families makes clear, virgin wilderness discovered by virtuous Anglo entrepreneurs. Rather, the United States was a newcomer in a place already complicated by vying empires. This book documents the broad family associations that crossed national and ethnic lines and that, along with the river systems of the trans-Mississippi West, formed the basis for a global trade in furs that had operated for hundreds of years before the land became part of the United States. Empires, Nations, and Families shows how the world of river and maritime trade effectively shifted political power away from military and diplomatic circles into the hands of local people. Tracing family stories from the Canadian North to the Spanish and Mexican borderlands and from the Pacific Coast to the Missouri and Mississippi rivers, Anne F. Hyde’s narrative moves from the earliest years of the Indian trade to the Mexican War and the gold rush era. Her work reveals how, in the 1850s, immigrants to these newest regions of the United States violently wrested control from Native and other powers, and how conquest and competing demands for land and resources brought about a volatile frontier culture—not at all the peace and prosperity that the new power had promised.

Woodcraft and Camping


George Washington Sears - 2011
    You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

The Bravest Woman in America


Marissa Moss - 2011
    Under her father’s watchful eye, she learned to polish the lighthouse lens so the light would shine bright.  She learned to watch the sea for any sign of trouble. And, most importantly, she learned to row.  Ida felt ready for anything—and she was.  Award-winning author Marissa Moss pairs up with award-winning illustrator Andrea U’Ren in a stunning collaboration that sheds light on a remarkable piece of history. Based on the true story of Ida Lewis, who was dubbed “the Bravest Woman in America” and who was recognized with the Congressional Life Saving Medal and the American Cross of Honor, this inspiring and unforgettable tale of courage and real-life heroism is a tribute to brave women everywhere.

The Days of Henry Thoreau


Walter Roy Harding - 2011
    To his contemporaries he was a minor disciple of Emerson; he has since joined the ranks of America's most respected and beloved writers. Few, however, really know the complexity of the man they revere — wanderer and scholar, naturalist and humorist, teacher and surveyor, abolitionist and poet, Transcendentalist and anthropologist, inventor and social critic, and, above all, individualist.In this widely acclaimed biography, outstanding Thoreau scholar Walter Harding presents all of these Thoreaus. Scholars will find here the culmination of a lifetime of research and study, meticulously documented; general readers will find an absorbing story of a remarkable man. Writing always with supreme clarity, Professor Harding has marshaled all the facts so as best to "let them speak for themselves." Thoreau's thoughtfulness and stubbornness, his more than ordinarily human amalgam of the earthy and the sublime, his unquenchable vitality emerge to the reader as they did to his own family, friends, and critics.You will see Thoreau's work in his family's pencil factory, his accidental setting of a forest fire, his love of children and hatred of hypocrisy, his contributions to the scientific understanding of forest trees, and other more and less familiar aspects of the man and his works. You will find the social as well as the reclusive Thoreau. Reactions to him by such notable contemporaries as Margaret Fuller, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Walt Whitman — with Thoreau's responses to them — are given in rich detail.The totality is as complete, accurate, fair, vivid, and fully rounded a portrait as has ever been drawn. On its appearance, Professor Harding's work immediately established itself as "the standard biography" (Edward Wagenknecht). It has never been superseded. For this Dover edition, the author has corrected minor errors, provided an appendix bibliographically documenting hundreds of facts, and contributed an Afterword updating some of his findings and discussing Thoreau scholarship.

Jane-A-Day: 5 Year Journal: 365 Witticisms by Jane Austen


Potter Style - 2011
    Each journal page features a memorable quote from the iconic author’s oeuvre that can be revisited each year. Created to help you make a time capsule of your thoughts, simply turn to today’s date and take a few moments to comment on the quote. When you finish the year, move on to the next section. As the years go by, you’ll notice how your commentary evolves.

Mr. Darcy Came to Dinner


Jack Caldwell - 2011
    Darcy, forcing the injured gentleman to reluctantly take up residence at Longbourn-- more specifically, in the parlor of Longbourn!In pain, forbidden to leave by his doctors, Mr. Darcy cannot escape the ridiculous antics of the Bennet clan.And when Georgiana Darcy, Colonel Fitzwilliam, and Lady Catherine de Bourgh arrive to visit the invalid, chaos, confusion, and hilarity ensue!Inspired by the classics of comedy, author Jack Caldwell transforms Austen's beloved novel into a tour de force of farce. The Regency will never be the same!

John Keats: Selected by Andrew Motion


John Keats - 2011
    By their choice of poems and by the personal and critical reactions they express in their prefaces, the editors offer insights into their own work as well as providing an accessible and passionate introduction to the most important poets in our literature.A thing of beauty is a joy for ever:Its loveliness increases; it will neverPass into nothingness; but still will keepA bower quiet for us, and a sleepFull of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing.-- Endymion

Abraham Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address


Abraham Lincoln - 2011
    You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

Dawn of the Belle Epoque: The Paris of Monet, Zola, Bernhardt, Eiffel, Debussy, Clemenceau, and Their Friends


Mary McAuliffe - 2011
    By 1900, Paris had recovered and the Belle Epoque was in full flower, but the decades between were difficult, marked by struggles between republicans and monarchists, the Republic and the Church, and an ongoing economic malaise, darkened by a rising tide of virulent anti-Semitism. Yet these same years also witnessed an extraordinary blossoming, in art, literature, poetry, and music, with the Parisian cultural scene dramatically upended by revolutionaries such as Monet, Zola, Rodin, and Debussy, even while Gustave Eiffel was challenging architectural tradition with his iconic tower. Through the eyes of these pioneers and others, including Sarah Bernhardt, Georges Clemenceau, Marie Curie, and Cesar Ritz, we witness their struggles with the forces of tradition during the final years of a century hurtling towards its close. Through rich illustrations and evocative narrative, McAuliffe brings this vibrant and seminal era to life."

Shame the Devil


Debra Brenegan - 2011
    Smith and I know them not ... It is not too much to say the newspapers are one of our strongest points of sympathy; that it is our meat and drink to praise and abuse them together; that we often in our imagination edit a model newspaper, which shall have for its motto, 'Speak the truth, and shame the devil.'" -- Fanny FernShame the Devil tells the remarkable and true story of Fanny Fern (the pen name of Sara Payson Willis), one of the most successful, influential, and popular writers of the nineteenth century. A novelist, journalist, and feminist, Fern (1811-1872) outsold Harriet Beecher Stowe, won the respect of Nathaniel Hawthorne, and served as literary mentor to Walt Whitman. Scrabbling in the depths of poverty before her meteoric rise to fame and fortune, she was widowed, escaped an abusive second marriage, penned one of the country's first prenuptial agreements, married a man eleven years her junior, and served as a nineteenth-century Oprah to her hundreds of thousands of fans. Her weekly editorials in the pages of the New York Ledger over a period of about twenty years chronicled the myriad controversies of her era and demonstrated her firm belief in the motto, "Speak the truth, and shame the devil." Through the story of Fern and her contemporaries, including Walt Whitman, Catharine Beecher, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Harriet Jacobs, and Nathaniel Hawthorne, Shame the Devil brings the intellectual and social ferment of mid-nineteenth-century America to life.

A Book for Black-Eyed Susan


Judy Young - 2011
    But the journey west by wagon train is harsh, and tragedy strikes swiftly and unexpectedly. Now Cora and her father must steel themselves for a different future from what they had carefully planned. How can they move forward when their hearts are broken? But move on they must, and Cora takes comfort in her new baby sister (named Susan after the black-eyed flowers). When Cora learns she and Susan are to be separated at the end of their journey, she looks to the past to help craft a link to their new lives. Judy Young is an award-winning author of children's fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Her other books in the Tales of Young Americans series are Minnow and Rose (2010 Storytelling World Resource Award) and The Lucky Star (2009 Storytelling World Honor Award). Judy lives near Springfield, Missouri. Doris Ettlinger graduated from the Rhode Island School of Design and has numerous picture books to her credit, including the award-winning The Orange Shoes. Doris lives and teaches in an old grist mill on the banks of the Musconetcong River in western New Jersey.

Bound to Sarah


Craig Brennan - 2011
    This story is brutal and shockingly unpredictable. In the year 1823, at the height of the British Empire and the colonization of Australia, Pat Roche sits on board a convict ship, sentenced for the term of his natural life to the New Colonies. All hope of ever seeing his wife and child again appeared to be lost. The ship is a fraught with tension under such a strict military guard; with one hundred and fifty criminals confined to a small space, it can only mean trouble. By the time the ship arrives at Van Dieman’s Land, there will be fighting, flogging, rape, murder and mutiny. Pat Roche will find himself involved in it all. Sarah Roche has now been shunned by the local community and is struggling to fend for herself and her little boy. There is a terrible turn of events and she is soon to follow in her husband’s footsteps. So too will a desperate voyage begin for her on board the female convict ship, otherwise known as ‘Floating Brothels’. She arrives in Hobart a broken woman, only regaining her strength after a fleeting moment with her husband. Pat is being taken away to a place of unbearable torment; the notorious Sarah Island settlement, where escape is punishable by death. Many colourful characters weave their way through the pages, creating a plot intertwined with deceit, retribution, murder, tragedy and enduring love, resulting in a heart wrenching climax.For Pat Roche, when there is nothing more worth living for, a chance to escape and find his family is worth dying for.

The Victorian Tailor: Techniques and Patterns for Making Historically Accurate Period Clothes for Gentlemen


Jason Maclochlainn - 2011
    The author, an expert in the field, has dipped into rare 19th-century tailoring sourcebooks and re-created the authentic techniques for today's budding tailor.An introductory section includes:--A glimpse into the 19th-century tailor's shop and the people who worked there--How men's fashion subtly evolved through the decades, with illustrations and Victorian photographs--Tools of the trade, and how they were used--and which ones are still worth using today--Which cloths to use for an authentic Victorian feel, and where to obtain them--The fundamental techniques every tailor should know, from how to sit in the traditional cross-legged manner to the full range of stitches used in the Victorian era.The book then moves on to give detailed instructions on how to draft and cut your own patterns to fit your client exactly, and gives 18 patterns from different decdes, including capes, waistcoats, trousers, frock coats, lounge coats, and even a shooting jacket and breeches for the Victorian sportsman. These are followed by clear and concise step-by-step directions for making up your finished garments, illustrated with authentic period fashion plates showing the essential wardrobe of a Victorian gentleman, this book will appeal to all costume designers, dressmakers, living historians, and those with an interest in creating these beautiful handmade garments, and contains everything you need to create authentic menswear from the period.

The Long Rifle


Stewart Edward White - 2011
    Stewart Edward White's tale of young Andy Burnett, inheritor of Daniel Boon's own long rifle, is as powerful and moving today as it was when written in the 1930s. It is the timeless story of maturing youth, backdropped by majestic Rocky Mountains and Set in the early nineteenth century fur-trade era. "The Long Rifle" recalls a time of endlessly expanding horizons, of oneness with nature, of refreshing innocence. Enjoy!

The Guatemala Reader: History, Culture, Politics


Greg Grandin - 2011
    In choosing the selections, the editors sought to avoid representing the country only in terms of its long experience of conflict, racism, and violence. And so, while offering many perspectives on that violence, this anthology portrays Guatemala as a real place where people experience joys and sorrows that cannot be reduced to the contretemps of resistance and repression. It includes not only the opinions of politicians, activists, and scholars, but also poems, songs, plays, jokes, novels, short stories, recipes, art, and photographs that capture the diversity of everyday life in Guatemala. The editors introduce all of the selections, from the first piece, an excerpt from the Popol Vuh, a mid-sixteenth-century text believed to be the single most important source documenting pre-Hispanic Maya culture, through the final selections, which explore contemporary Guatemala in relation to neoliberalism, multiculturalism, and the dynamics of migration to the United States and of immigrant life. Many pieces were originally published in Spanish, and most of those appear in English for the first time.

The Library of Congress Illustrated Timeline of the Civil War


Margaret E. Wagner - 2011
    A detailed chronological timeline of the war captures the harrowing intensity of 19th-century warfare in first-hand accounts from soldiers, nurses, and front-line journalists. Readers will be enthralled by speech drafts in Lincoln's own hand, quotes from the likes of Frederick Douglass and Robert E. Lee, and portraits of key soldiers and politicians who are not covered in standard textbooks. The Illustrated Timeline's exciting new source material and lucid organization will give Civil War enthusiasts a fresh look at this defining period in our nation's history.

The Battle of Adwa: African Victory in the Age of Empire


Raymond Jonas - 2011
    In an age of relentless European expansion, Ethiopia had successfully defended its independence and cast doubt upon an unshakable certainty of the age-that sooner or later all Africans would fall under the rule of Europeans. This event opened a breach that would lead, in the aftermath of world war fifty years later, to the continent's painful struggle for freedom from colonial rule.Raymond Jonas offers the first comprehensive account of this singular episode in modern world history. The narrative is peopled by the ambitious and vain, the creative and the coarse, across Africa, Europe, and the Americas-personalities like Menelik, a biblically inspired provincial monarch who consolidated Ethiopia's throne; Taytu, his quick-witted and aggressive wife; and the Swiss engineer Alfred Ilg, the emperor's close advisor. The Ethiopians' brilliant gamesmanship and savvy public relations campaign helped roll back the Europeanization of Africa.Figures throughout the African diaspora immediately grasped the significance of Adwa, Menelik, and an independent Ethiopia. Writing deftly from a transnational perspective, Jonas puts Adwa in the context of manifest destiny and Jim Crow, signaling a challenge to the very concept of white dominance. By reopening seemingly settled questions of race and empire, the Battle of Adwa was thus a harbinger of the global, unsettled century about to unfold.

Soldiers: Army Lives and Loyalties from Redcoats to Dusty Warriors


Richard Holmes - 2011
    From battlefield to barrack-room, this book is stuffed to the brim with anecdotes and stories of soldiers from the army of Charles II, through Empire and two World Wars to modern times.The British soldier forms a core component of British history. In this scholarly but gossipy book, Richard Holmes presents a rich social history of the man (and now more frequently woman) who have been at the heart of his writing for decades.Technological, political and social changes have all made their mark on the development of warfare, but have the attitudes of the soldier shifted as much we might think?For Holmes, the soldier is part of a unique tribe – and the qualities of loyalty and heroism have continued to grow amongst these men. And while today the army constitutes the smallest proportion of the population since the first decade of its existence (regular soldiers make up just 0.087%), the social organisation of the men has hardly changed; the major combat arms, infantry, cavalry and artillery, have retained much of the forms that men who fought at Blenheim, Waterloo and the Somme would readily grasp.Regiments remain an enduring feature of the army and Lieutenant Colonels have lost nothing of their importance in military hierarchy; the death of Lieutenant Colonel Rupert Thorneloe in Afghanistan in 2009 shows just how high the risks are that these men continue to face.Filled to the brim with stories from all over the world and spanning across history, this magisterial book conveys how soldiers from as far back as the seventeenth century and soldiers today are united by their common experiences.Richard Holmes died suddenly, soon after completing this book. It is his last word on the British soldier – about which he knew and wrote so much.

The Untold Civil War: Exploring the Human Side of War


James I. Robertson Jr. - 2011
    Postal Service? Did President Lincoln really age so dramatically

The Best Ghost Stories 1800-1849: A Classic Ghost Anthology


Andrew Barger - 2011
    Some stories thought too horrific were published anonymously like "A Night in a Haunted House" and "The Deaf and Dumb Girl." The later story is collected for the first time in any anthology since its original publication in 1839.The other ghost stories in this fine collection are by famous authors. "The Mask of the Red Death," by Edgar Allan Poe; "A Chapter in the History of a Tyrone Family," by Joseph Sheridan le Fanu; "The Spectral Ship," by Wilhelm Hauff; "The Old Maid in the Winding Sheet," by Nathaniel Hawthorne; "The Adventure of the German Student," and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow," by Washington Irving; as well as "The Tapestried Chamber," by Sir Walter Scott.As he has done with a number of other books, Andrew Barger has added his scholarly touch to this collection by including story backgrounds, annotations, author photos and a foreword titled "All Ghosts Are Gray." Buy the book today and be ready to be scared.

Independence: A Guide to Historic Philadelphia


George Boudreau - 2011
    Grounded in enlightenment ideals, Philadelphia attracted diverse settlers from the Old and New Worlds. By the 1760s, a cash-strapped England set its sights on taxing the American colonies to pay its debts. Philadelphia assumed roles as a center of revolutionary protests, a meeting place for colonial delegates to decide on independence and a new form of government, and, finally, the first capital of the United States of America. Richly illustrated with both new photography and an amazing array of early American art drawn from the collections of some of America’s leading museums and archives, Independence: A Guide to Historic Philadelphia reveals the stories of the persons who experienced the early years of the new nation in America’s first capital. Based on meticulous research, Independence walks its readers through the lives of the residents and visitors of the revolutionary city, and through the streets and buildings that they knew. Famous names are here: Franklin, Jefferson, Adams, Washington. But Independence also focuses on the fascinating stories of less famous American founders. Enslaved and free, women and men, rich and poor, patriot and Tory, shaped Philadelphia’s and America’s experience in the revolutionary era, and all have their say here. In addition, this guide tells the stories of the iconic buildings and streets where America was founded. The book explores the dozens of buildings that make up Independence National Historical Park and connects these with neighboring sites that are also intimately associated with the story of America’s birth. Independence will enrich the experience of those who travel to these historic sites, as well as offer a vivid and fascinating story for the general reader.

Lily, Duchess of Marlborough (1854–1909): A Portrait with Husbands


Sally E. Svenson - 2011
    The duke was one of three distinguished, but, alas, short-lived husbands of this beauty from Troy, New York. Her first husband, Louis Hamersley, was a patrician New Yorker who left her an affluent widow at the age of twenty-eight. Her second was the brilliant but "wicked," divorced, and socially outcast Duke of Marlborough, brother-in-law to Jennie Churchill, uncle to Winston, and father to the first husband of Consuelo Vanderbilt. Lily's third choice was an ebullient Anglo-Irish lord, William de la Poer Beresford, a horseracing enthusiast whose popularity has been likened to that of modern film stars. In the course of a surprising life, Lily knew triumph and heartbreak while proving herself a woman of self-confidence, optimism, and remarkable resilience. Lily's "three marriages, her confident ease in moving into impossibly complicated and exalted social realms, and her decades of dealing with legal complexities related to wills, estates, and trusts make her story read like a newly discovered Edith Wharton novel. The history of the fairytale years when Lily became the Duchess of Marlborough and a dear friend of Winston Churchill is immensely readable and fascinating."—Eric Homberger, emeritus professor of American Studies, University of East Anglia, and author of Mrs. Astor's New York: Money and Social Power in a Gilded Age"This entrancing portrait of a conventional American girl who made three extraordinary marriages draws on society papers and women's magazines as well as archives, court records and private papers to create a lively and vivid picture of social elites on both sides of the Atlantic during the late nineteenth century." —Sally Mitchell, author of Daily Life in Victorian England and The New Girl: Girls' Culture in England, 1880-1915

See/Saw: Connections Between Japanese Art Then and Now


Ivan Vartanian - 2011
    Often defined by its references to manga or anime, contemporary Japanese art in fact has much broader roots. By drawing parallels between the art of Japan past and present, this compelling volume reveals how current artists rework the traditional forms and techniques of Japanese art history. Modern takes on time-honored conventions are illustrated by the work of a star-studded roster of contemporary artists including Tabaimo, Makoto Aida, Takashi Murakami, Yoshitomo Nara, and Yayoi Kusama. Aficionados of both contemporary and traditional Japan are sure to appreciate this fresh perspective on art and the power of visual culture.

The Doctor's Mission


Debbie Kaufman - 2011
    The Nynabo mission in Liberia, Africa, desperately needs help, but he's vowed not to put another female in jeopardy. Too bad flame-haired Dr. Mary O'Hara refuses to turn back—and he cannot allow her to go into the jungle alone.Medicine or marriage? For Mary, the choice was clear. Far away from the patriarchal medical community, she resolves to be of real service. She'll willingly go head-to-head with the handsome, opinionated missionary, even in the face of deadly danger. Yet the greatest tests lie in trusting God's plan—for the mission, and her future happiness in this untamed, beautiful land….

Raising Racists: The Socialization of White Children in the Jim Crow South


Kristina DuRocher - 2011
    White children rested at the core of the system of segregation between 1890 and 1939 because their participation was crucial to ensuring the future of white supremacy. Their socialization in the segregated South offers an examination of white supremacy from the inside, showcasing the culture's efforts to preserve itself by teaching its beliefs to the next generation.In Raising Racists: The Socialization of White Children in the Jim Crow South, author Kristina DuRocher reveals how white adults in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries continually reinforced race and gender roles to maintain white supremacy. DuRocher examines the practices, mores, and traditions that trained white children to fear, dehumanize, and disdain their black neighbors. Raising Racists combines an analysis of the remembered experiences of a racist society, how that society influenced children, and, most important, how racial violence and brutality shaped growing up in the early-twentieth-century South.

Ardency: a Chronicle of the Amistad Rebels


Kevin Young - 2011
    Written over twenty years, this poetic epic—part libretto, part captivity epistle—makes the past present, and even its sorrows sing.In “Buzzard,” the opening section, we hear from the African interpreter for the rebels, mostly from Sierra Leone, who were captured on their winding attempt to sail home and were jailed in New Haven. In “Correspondance,” we encounter the remarkable letters to John Quincy Adams and others that the captives write from jail, where abolitionists taught them English while converting them to Christianity. In lines profound and pointed, the men demand their freedom in their newfound tongue: “All we want is make us free.” The book culminates in “Witness,” a libretto chanted by Cinque, the rebel leader, who yearns for his family and freedom while eloquently evoking the Amistads’ conversion and life in “Merica.” As Young conjures this array of history and music, interweaving the liberation cry of Negro spirituals and the indoctrinating wordplay of American primers, he delivers his signature songlike immediacy at the service of a tremendous epic built on the ironies, violence, and virtues of American history. Vivid and true, Ardency is a powerful meditation on who we’ve been and who we are.

The Paris Commune: A Revolution in Democracy


Donny Gluckstein - 2011
    When they established the world’s first workers’ democracy—the Paris Commune—they found no ready-made blueprints, and no precedents to study for how to run their city without princes, prison wardens, or professional politicians. All they had was the boundless revolutionary enthusiasm of Paris’s socialists, communists, anarchists, and radical Jacobins, all of whom threw their energies into creating a new society.As the city’s bakers, industrial workers, and other “ruffians” built new institutions of collective political power to overturn social and economic inequality, their former rulers sought to thwart their efforts by any means necessary—ultimately deciding to drown the Communards in blood.By paying particular attention to the historic problems of the Commune, critical debates over its implications, and the glimpse of a better world the Commune provided, Gluckstein reveals its enduring lessons and inspiration for today’s struggles.Donny Gluckstein is author of The Nazis, Capitalism and the Working Class and The Tragedy of Bukharin. He is a lecturer in history in Edinburgh and is a member of the Socialist Workers Party.

Vauxhall Gardens: A History


David E. Coke - 2011
    By the 18th century, Vauxhall was crucial to the cultural and fashionable life of the country, patronized by all levels of society, from royal dukes to penurious servants. In the first book on the subject for over fifty years, Alan Borg and David E. Coke reveal the teeming life, the spectacular art and the ever-present music of Vauxhall in fascinating detail. Borg and Coke's historical exposition of the entire history of the gardens makes a major contribution to the study of London entertainments, art, music, sculpture, class and ideology. It reveals how Vauxhall linked high and popular culture in ways that look forward to the manner in which both art and entertainment have evolved in modern times.

Faberge Revealed: At the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts


Geza von Habsburg - 2011
    The essays by Géza von Habsburg and other scholars present new findings on Fabergé, his workshops, and the creation of these extraordinary objects. For the first time all items by or attributed to Fabergé in VMFA's collection are documented along with the museum's significant holdings of other Russian decorative arts. Also included is a section on forgeries that bravely confronts this vexing question. Every object has been splendidly re-photographed for this book - and the detailed photography alone should provide inestimable value for future Fabergé scholarship.Richly illustrated with some 600 photographs, the volume documents an important collection bequeathed in 1947 to the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts by Lillian Thomas Pratt, of Fredericksburg, Va., the wife of General Motors executive John Lee Pratt. Her collection, assembled between 1933 and 1946, comprised several hundred creations by the Faberge workshops and by other Russian imperial jewelers. These exquisite, marvelously crafted objects, range from the majestic jeweled imperial eggs to delicate jeweled flowers in vases to diamond-encrusted icons and tiaras, to animal figures nimbly carved from precious stone.Contents: Introduction by Géza von Habsburg Chapter 1: The House of Fabergé/by Géza von HabsburgChapter 2: Behind the Scenes at Fabergé: The St. Petersburg Workshops/  by Ulla Tillander-GodenhieimChapter 3: Fabergé and His Russian Competitors/ by Géza von HabsburgChapter 4: Fabergé and His Foreign Competitors Chapter 5: Mrs. Pratt's Imperial Easter Eggs / by Carol AikenChapter 6: The Zarnitza Sailor and His Place in History / by Christel Ludewig McCaniessChapter 7: Fabergé and Grand Duchess Vladimir / by Alexander von SolodkoffChapter 8: Lillian Thomas Pratt and A La Vieille Russie: A Personal Relationship/ by Mark SchafferChapter 9: Fauxbergé / by Géza von HabsburgCatalogue: Fabergé/Other Makers/Forgeries

Uncle Tom's Cabin and the Reading Revolution: Race, Literacy, Childhood, and Fiction, 1851-1911


Barbara Hochman - 2011
    These changes reshaped interpretive conventions and generated new meanings for Stowe's text in the wake of the Civil War.During the 1850s, men, women, and children avidly devoured Stowe's novel. White adults wept and could not put the book down, neglecting work and other obligations to complete it. African Americans both celebrated and denounced the book. By the 1890s, readers understood Uncle Tom's Cabin in new ways. Prefaces and retrospectives celebrated Stowe's novel as a historical event that led directly to emancipation and national unity. Commentaries played down the evangelical and polemical messages of the book.Illustrations and children's editions projected images of entertaining and devoted servants into an open-ended future. In the course of the 1890s, Uncle Tom's Cabin became both a more viciously racialized book than it had been and a less compelling one. White readers no longer consumed the book at one sitting; Uncle Tom's Cabin was now more widely known than read. However, in the growing silence surrounding slavery at the turn of the century, Stowe's book became an increasingly important source of ideas, facts, and images that the children of ex-slaves and other free-black readers could use to make sense of their position in U.S. culture. - See more at: http: //www.umass.edu/umpress/title/uncle-tom...

The Gurkhas


Christopher Bellamy - 2011
    As brave as they are resilient, resourceful and cunning, they have earned a reputation as devastating fighters, and their unswerving loyalty to the Crown has always inspired affection in the British people. There are also now up to 40,000 Gurkhas in the million-strong army of modern India. But who are the Gurkhas? How much of the myth that surrounds them is true? Award-winning historian Chris Bellamy uncovers the Gurkhas' origins in the Hills of Nepal, the extraordinary circumstances in which the British decided to recruit them and their rapid emergence as elite troops of the East India Company, the British Raj and the British Empire. Their special aptitude meant they were used as the first British 'Special Forces'. Bellamy looks at the wars the Gurkhas have fought this century, from the two world wars through the Falklands to Iraq and Afghanistan and examines their remarkable status now, when each year 11,000 hopefuls apply for just over 170 places in the British Army Gurkhas. Extraordinarily compelling, this book brings the history of the Gurkhas, and the battles they have fought, right up to date, and explores their future.About the AuthorChris Bellamy is an acclaimed historian and journalist. His latest book, Absolute War: Soviet Russia in the Second World War won the Westminster Medal for Military Literature. Previously he has been Defence Correspondent at the Independent. He was shortlisted for Foreign Reporter of the Year in the British Press Awards and the Foreign Press Association Awards in 1996 for reporting from Chechnya.ReviewsProfessor Bellamy condenses a wealth of detail in a readable way, and critically, brings objectivity ... Bellamy's account of Britain's and India's Gurkhas is shrewd and insightful -- The Times 'Thoroughly researched and clearly written' -- Observer

Evangeline's Miracle


Lisa Buie-Collard - 2011
    A grieving ghost, an unsolved mystery, a lost child, a broken marriage, and an estranged mother and daughter. Can one young woman find the answer to the mystery before yet another tragedy strikes? In 1877 Lady Miracle Sobieski dies a sad, broken-hearted aristocrat. Yet her restless spirit reaches through time to a particular young woman to try and avert a mysterious legacy of tragedy. In 2007 Evangeline Lacroix loves her husband to distraction. But her unspoken fears strain their three-year marriage to the breaking point. As her life falls apart, Evie finds herself compelled to solve the 100 year-old mystery. Elusive and sometimes dangerous clues entangle her in an intricate web of deceit and (hopelessness?) disaster that threatens everything she's ever known. As time runs out, she discovers a connection between herself and the haunted ghost. Will Evie ignore her life-long fears and listen to the past? Will she save Miracle, and in so doing save herself, before tragedy strikes again?

Death in a Scarlet Gown


Lexie Conyngham - 2011
    An ancient Scottish university is wracked by murder. A vindictive professor, a man seeking ministry, and an uncouth student lie dead. But who wanted to kill them? Charles Murray, a student with enough problems of his own, is drawn into the mystery, where neither tragic accidents nor good friends are what they seem. Death in a Scarlet Gown is first in the Murray of Letho series.

Black Gotham: A Family History of African Americans in Nineteenth-Century New York City


Carla L. Peterson - 2011
    As she shares their stories and those of their friends, neighbors, and business associates, she illuminates the greater history of African-American elites in New York City.Black Gotham challenges many of the accepted "truths" about African-American history, including the assumption that the phrase "nineteenth-century black Americans" means enslaved people, that "New York state before the Civil War" refers to a place of freedom, and that a black elite did not exist until the twentieth century. Beginning her story in the 1820s, Peterson focuses on the pupils of the Mulberry Street School, the graduates of which went on to become eminent African-American leaders. She traces their political activities as well as their many achievements in trade, business, and the professions against the backdrop of the expansion of scientific racism, the trauma of the Civil War draft riots, and the rise of Jim Crow.Told in a vivid, fast-paced style, Black Gotham is an important account of the rarely acknowledged achievements of nineteenth-century African Americans and brings to the forefront a vital yet forgotten part of American history and culture.

Bradshaw's Guide


George Bradshaw - 2011
    No further information has been provided for this title.

John Martin


Martin Myrone - 2011
    His dramatic paintings depicted catastrophe, war, apocalypse, and nature on an epic scale and appealed to a wider and more diverse audience than had ever previously been engaged by art. These works continue to reverberate, having long influenced Hollywood directors, science fiction writers, and other artists. Martin was one of the first artists to exploit the possibilities offered by printed reproductions; Engravings of his paintings were widely available and hugely popular, shocking the art establishment of his day. This first comprehensive book on Martin in many years examines the critic’s idea of the proper role of the artist, questioning Martin’s place in art history as well as our own ideas of “good” and “bad” taste, “high” and “low” art.

The Town That Fooled the British: A War of 1812 Story


Lisa Papp - 2011
    Michaels, Maryland, is a town of shipbuilders whose reputation for crafting powerful schooners carries far beyond the shores of young America. And once the War of 1812 starts, that's not necessarily a good thing. For the British have targeted the town as part of their campaign to defeat America in its fight to maintain its independence. And now, in August of 1813 the British fleet is sailing up the Chesapeake River to St. Michaels. The town's militia is assembled but no one expects they can win the fight against the powerful British cannons. Citizens are being evacuated and the town is in turmoil.All young Henry Middle wants to do is find his father amid the chaos of the coming attack. The lanterns he carries will be of use to the militia. As Henry works to conquer his rising fear, he realizes he may hold the answer to outsmarting the British in his very hands.

Portrait Jewels: Opulence and Intimacy from the Medici to the Romanovs


Diana Scarisbrick - 2011
    Dynasties represented here include the Valois and Bourbon in France; Bavarian, Habsburg, and Hanoverian in Germany, Central Europe, and Spain; Tudor, Stuart, and Hanoverian in Britain; and the House of Orange-Nassau in the Netherlands. Men and women famous in politics, religion, history, literature, and the arts, including Queen Elizabeth I, Louis XIV, Catherine the Great, Voltaire and Madame du Châtelet, Popes Clement XII and Pius VII, and Lord Byron are featured in this exquisite miniature gallery.The author draws upon her knowledge of jewelry, painting, history, and literature to set the portrait jewels in the context of people’s lives, and shows how they were worn and what they meant to donors and recipients—tokens of allegiance to a ruler, of commitment between lovers, of affection within families.

Saga of the Sioux: An Adaptation from Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee


Dee Brown - 2011
    Focusing on the Sioux nation as representative of the entire Native American story, this meticulously researched account allows the great chiefs and warriors to speak for themselves about what happened to the Sioux from 1860 to the Massacre of Wounded Knee in 1891. This dramatic story is essential reading for every student of U.S. history.

Bluebeard Tales from Around the World


Heidi Anne Heiner - 2011
    It has often been retold and reinterpreted in modern times in novels, poetry, plays, movies and more. Once upon a time the character was better known and offered a larger cultural touchstone for the general population. Today he is best known only in literary circles. Consequently, the history of the tale as seen through its tales and other interpretations is fascinating. Offering over ninety tales and ballads, this collection compiles several variants of Bluebeard tales from around the world. Many of the tales are new translations, some appearing for the first time in English. Usually the stories are obviously related to each other and at other times the relationship is more tenuous. While tales from Europe dominate the collection, other parts of the world--including Africa, India, and North America--are well represented. Additionally, several plays and operas, as well as short fictions and poetry, all primarily from the nineteenth century, are offered here. The commercial value and diverse interpretations of this complex tale provide insight into our cultural past, present, and perhaps our future. Whether you are a student of folklore or an armchair enthusiast, this anthology offers a diverse array of tales with a unifying theme that both entertains and educates, all gathered for the first time in one helpful collection.

Suspiria de Profundis and Other Writings


Thomas de Quincey - 2011
    Best known for his command of the psychological fantasy story, De Quincey produced stories of the curious and obscure, but always with the traditional Romantic emphasis on feeling. His masterwork, "Confessions of an English Opium Eater" (1821), stemmed from his own laudanum addiction, and was followed by "Suspiria de Profundis", a collection of essays which continued to capture the same dark brilliance as in "Confessions". The collection was originally published in fragmentary form, and remained unfinished upon De Quincey's death in 1859. This edition includes "The Affliction of Childhood," a reflection on the death of the author's two sisters in childhood, "Levana and our Ladies of Sorrow," one of his best-known works about the Roman goddess of childbirth, and "The English Mail-Coach," on the "grandeur and power" of the English mail-coach system.

Louis Sullivan: Creating a New American Architecture


Patrick F. Cannon - 2011
    Having spent much of his career in a late Victorian world that bristled with fussy ornament for ornament's sake, Sullivan (American, 1856-1924) refuted this style with the now famous dictum "Form follows function." This break from tradition is perhaps most evident in Sullivan's strides to reimagine the commercial space--from America's earliest skyscrapers to the small-town banks that populated the architect's commissions in the second half of his career.In "Louis Sullivan: Creating a New American Architecture, " nearly 200 photographs with descriptive captions document Sullivan's genius for modern design. Patrick Cannon introduces each chapter and discusses the influences that shaped Sullivan's illustrious career. Rare historical photographs chronicle those buildings that, sadly, have since been destroyed, while James Caulfield's contemporary photography captures those still standing.

The Perfect Lion: The Life and Death of Confederate Artillerist John Pelham


Jerry H. Maxwell - 2011
    E. B. Stuart and Stonewall Jackson, but no individual has had a greater elevation to divine status than John Pelham, remembered as the “Gallant Pelham.” An Alabama native, Pelham left West Point for service in the Confederacy and distinguished himself as an artillery commander in Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia. Lee is reported to have said of him, “It is glorious to see such courage in one so young!” Blond, blue-eyed, and handsome, Pelham’s modest demeanor charmed his contemporaries, and he was famously attractive to women. He was killed in action at the battle of Kelly’s Ford in March of 1863, at twenty-four years of age, and reportedly three young women of his acquaintance donned mourning at the loss of the South’s “beau ideal.” Maxwell’s work provides the first complete, deeply researched biography of Pelham, perhaps Alabama’s most notable Civil War figure, and explains his enduring attraction.

Peoples on Parade: Exhibitions, Empire, and Anthropology in Nineteenth-Century Britain


Sadiah Qureshi - 2011
    Dickens was not the only Londoner intrigued by these “living curiosities”: displayed foreign peoples provided some of the most popular public entertainments of their day. At first, such shows tended to be small-scale entrepreneurial speculations of just a single person or a small group. By the end of the century, performers were being imported by the hundreds and housed in purpose-built “native” villages for months at a time, delighting the crowds and allowing scientists and journalists the opportunity to reflect on racial difference, foreign policy, slavery, missionary work, and empire. Peoples on Parade provides the first substantial overview of these human exhibitions in nineteenth-century Britain. Sadiah Qureshi considers these shows in their entirety—their production, promotion, management, and performance—to understand why they proved so commercially successful, how they shaped performers’ lives, how they were interpreted by their audiences, and what kinds of lasting influence they may have had on notions of race and empire. Qureshi supports her analysis with diverse visual materials, including promotional ephemera, travel paintings, theatrical scenery, art prints, and photography, and thus contributes to the wider understanding of the relationship between science and visual culture in the nineteenth century. Through Qureshi’s vibrant telling and stunning images, readers will see how human exhibitions have left behind a lasting legacy both in the formation of early anthropological inquiry and in the creation of broader public attitudes toward racial difference.

An Introduction to Nineteenth-Century Art


Michelle Facos - 2011
    This textbook will provide readers with a basic historical framework of the period and the critical tools for interpreting and situating new and unfamiliar works of art.Michelle Facos goes beyond existing histories of nineteenth-century art, which often focus solely on France, Britain, and the United States, to incorporate artists and artworks from Scandinavia, Germany, and Eastern Europe.The book expertly balances its coverage of trends and individual artworks: where the salient trends are clear, trend-setting works are highlighted, and the complexity of the period is respected by situating all works in their proper social and historical context. In this way, the student reader achieves a more nuanced understanding of the way in which the story of nineteenth-century art is the story of the ways in which artists and society grappled with the problem of modernity.Key pedagogical features include:Data boxes provide statistics, timelines, charts, and historical information about the period to further situate artworks.Text boxes highlight extracts from original sources, citing the ideas of artists and their contemporaries, including historians, philosophers, critics, and theorists, to place artists and works in the broader context of aesthetic, cultural, intellectual, social, and political conditions in which artists were working.Beautifully illustrated with over 250 color images.Margin notes and glossary definitions.Online resources at www.routledge.com/textbooks/facos with access to a wealth of information, including original documents pertaining to artworks discussed in the textbook, contemporary criticism, timelines and maps to enrich your understanding of the period and allow for further comparison and exploration.Chapters take a thematic approach combined within an overarching chronology and more detailed discussions of individual works are always put in the context of the broader social picture, thus providing students with a sense of art history as a controversial and alive arena of study.Michelle Facos teaches art history at Indiana University, Bloomington. Her research explores the changing relationship between artists and society since the Enlightenment and issues of identity. Prior publications include Nationalism and the Nordic Imagination: Swedish Painting of the 1890s (1998), Art, Culture and National Identity in Fin-de-Siecle Europe, co-edited with Sharon Hirsh (2003), and Symbolist Art in Context (2009).

Red Shambhala: Magic, Prophecy, and Geopolitics in the Heart of Asia


Andrei Znamenski - 2011
    But few may know of the role Shambhala played in Russian geopolitics in the early twentieth century. Perhaps the only one on the subject, Andrei Znamenski’s book presents a wholly different glimpse of early Soviet history both erudite and fascinating. Using archival sources and memoirs, he explores how spiritual adventurers, revolutionaries, and nationalists West and East exploited Shambhala to promote their fanatical schemes, focusing on the Bolshevik attempt to use Mongol-Tibetan prophecies to railroad Communism into inner Asia. We meet such characters as Gleb Bokii, the Bolshevik secret police commissar who tried to use Buddhist techniques to conjure the ideal human; and Nicholas Roerich, the Russian painter who, driven by his otherworldly Master and blackmailed by the Bolshevik secret police, posed as a reincarnation of the Dalai Lama to unleash religious war in Tibet. We also learn of clandestine activities of the Bolsheviks from the Mongol-Tibetan Section of the Communist International who took over Mongolia and then, dressed as lama pilgrims, tried to set Tibet ablaze; and of their opponent, Ja-Lama, an “avenging lama” fond of spilling blood during his tantra rituals.

A Better Place: Death and Burial in Nineteenth-Century Ontario


Susan Smart - 2011
    Funeral rituals, strong religious beliefs, and a firm conviction that death was a beginning not an end helped the bereaved through their times of loss in a century where death was always close at hand.The book describes the pioneer funeral in detail as well as the factors that changed this simple funeral into the elaborate etiquette-driven Victorian funeral at the end of the century. It includes the sources of various funeral customs, including the origins of embalming that gave rise to the modern-day funeral parlour. The evolution of cemeteries is explained with the beginnings of cemeteries in specific towns given as examples.An understanding of these changing burial rites, many of which might seem strange to us today, is invaluable for the family historian. In addition, the book includes practical suggestions for finding death and burial records throughout the century.

Hill of Squandered Valour: The Battle for Spion Kop, 1900


Ron Lock - 2011
    It was the single bloodiest episode in the campaign, as well as a harbinger of the bitter and desperate fighting still to come in the Second Boer War.Spion Kop, just northeast of Ladysmith, was the largest hill in the region, being over 1,400 feet high, and it lay almost exactly at the center of the Boer line. If the British could capture this position and bring artillery to the hill they would then command the flanks of the surrounding Boer positions.On the night of 23 January 1900, a large British force under Major General Edward Woodgate was dispatched to secure the height, with Lt. Colonel Alexander Thorneycroft selected to lead the initial assault. However, the Boers refused to give up the position and a bitter two days of fighting ensued. In the initial darkness the British mistakenly entrenched at the center of the hill instead of the crest, and suffered horribly from Boer marksmen clinging to the periphery. Suffering badly themselves, the Boers were finally inclined to admit defeat when they discovered that the British had retreated, leaving behind their many dead. Yet, in light of the devastation wrought on both sides, the British were finally able to rally and relieve Ladysmith four weeks later. Ron Lock, esteemed author of many Zulu warfare histories, brings to life this bitter and previously overlooked campaign in vivid and complete detail, with supporting sources including then-journalist Winston Churchill s battle report, as well as many previously unpublished illustrations and 6 newly commissioned maps. His account will be valuable to both historians and strategists wanting to better understand this difficult and devastating conflict.REVIEWS a wonderful addition to the bookshelves not only of enthusiasts in the Anglo-Boer War but anybody with an interest in military history. Guild of Battlefield Guides Member Tony Scott Ron Lock s well-researched book brings to life this bitter and somewhat overlooked battle in vivid and complete detail This account will be valuable to both historians and armchair generals wanting a better understanding of this difficult and devastating conflict. Military Modelcraft International Ron Lock has done his homework in compiling this history nicely presented Highly recommended Miniature Wargames a boon to anyone seeking a better understanding of the Boer War s intricacies, follies, ironies and pathos Toy Soldier and Model Figure Magazine well written, easy to read, and focuses on the British perspective of the battles involved and included much about the action and leadership of the Boers. It provided good focused context for anyone with ancestors involved with this campaign. Paul Milner, FGS FORUM..".an excellent read, well researched and incisive in his handling of the various protagonists involved. He succeeds in offering a fresh perspective"Al Venter, Author of Barrel of a Gun, Iran's Nuclear Option, Gunship Ace, Mercaenaries, War Dog"

From the Earth, a Cry: The Story of John Boyle O'Reilly


Ian Kenneally - 2011
    A biography of one of Ireland's most remarkable historical figures; a compelling account of an extraordinary life.

Pioneers of France in the New World


Francis Parkman - 2011
    He is best known for his works The Oregon Trail: Sketches of Prairie and Rocky-Mountain Life and the 7 volume France and England in North America. Published in 1907 Pioneers of France in the New World is an in depth look at the history of Canada and the Northwest. Some of the topics covered area as follows: Early French Adventure in North America; La Roche-Champlain-De Monts, Acadia Occupied, Lescarbot and Champlain, Early Spanish Adventure, Villegagnon, The Great War Party; Hostile Sects-Rival Interests, and The English at Quebec

A Fine Likeness: A Novel in the House Divided Series


Sean McLachlan - 2011
    Jimmy Rawlins is a teenaged bushwhacker who leads his friends on ambushes of Union patrols. They join infamous guerrilla leader Bloody Bill Anderson on a raid through Missouri, but Jimmy questions his commitment to the Cause when he discovers this madman plans to sacrifice a Union prisoner in a hellish ritual to raise the Confederate dead. Richard Addison is an aging captain of a lackluster Union militia. Depressed over his son's death in battle, a glimpse of Jimmy changes his life. Jimmy and his son look so much alike that Addison becomes obsessed with saving him from Bloody Bill. Captain Addison must wreck his reputation to win this war within a war, while Jimmy must decide whether to betray the Confederacy to stop the evil arising in the woods of Missouri.

From This Day Forward


Margaret Daley - 2011
    Shortly after the War of 1812, Rachel and her husband set out from England for a plantation in South Carolina, which he had purchased sight unseen. However, while en route, Tom Gordon fell overboard and drowned, leaving Rachel, frightened and alone, to make a home for her and her newborn. Can a battle-scarred American physician who comes to her rescue also heal her wounded heart?

Penny Dread Tales, Volume 1: Gears, Coils, Aether & Steam


Christopher Ficco - 2011
    Encounter angels, zombie soldiers and aliens walking through the Victorian age. And what would any steampunk anthology be without zeppelins, time machines and a guest appearance by Sherlock Holmes? It's steampunk, so we even threw in a great dinosaur hunt simply because the kitchen sink just wasn't big enough. Sit back, relax and explore the world as it could have been if people like Mary Shelley, Jules Verne and H.G. Wells got their way. "Penny Dread Tales: Volume One" is a steampunk short story anthology dedicated to the 19th and early 20th century publication format affectionately referred to as the Penny Dreadful. At four-hundred pages and 18 steampunk stories long, you're sure to find plenty of fun, action and excitement. Whether you're a long-time devotee of steampunk or newly introduced to the world of brass goggles, giant zeppelins and impossible inventions from the mad minds of Victorian scientists, you're sure to find a tale or three that catches your fancy. This steampunk anthology has an assortment of tales ranging from purist steampunk to fantasy steampunk to brushes-up-against-steampunk. It even includes a science fiction short story actually written during the Victorian era. Edited by Christopher Ficco and with cover artwork by Laura Givens, we've gathered writers and authors from all over the world. Contributors come from the U.S., Israel, Australia, New Zealand and Ireland. It's a smorgasbord of steampunk, and you're sure to find something (or somethings) you like.

The French Idea of History


Carolina Armenteros - 2011
    the champion of the hardest, narrowest, and most inflexible dogmatism... part learned doctor, part inquisitor, part executioner." Thus did �mile Faguet describe Joseph-Marie de Maistre (1753-1821) in his 1899 history of nineteenth-century thought. This view of the influential thinker as a reactionary has, with little variation, held sway ever since. In The French Idea of History, Carolina Armenteros recovers a very different figure, one with a far more subtle understanding of, and response to, the events of his day.Maistre emerges from this deeply learned book as the crucial bridge between the Enlightenment and the historicized thought of the nineteenth century. Armenteros demonstrates that Maistre inaugurated a specifically French way of thinking about past, present, and future that held sway not only among conservative political theorists but also among intellectuals generally considered to belong to the left, particularly the Utopian Socialists.

HMS Warrior 1860: Victoria's Ironclad Deterrent


Andrew D. Lambert - 2011
    This lavishly illustrated book examines her design, career, subsequent history, and the extensive restoration program that restored the ship to her former glory. Published to coincide with the 150th anniversary of her launch, it provides a brand new photographic record of the entire ship, complete with a newly commissioned set of detailed plans.

Royal Fabergé


Caroline de Guitaut - 2011
    Taking the forms of imperial Easter eggs, dazzling jewel-encrusted boxes, and diamond- and ruby-adorned hardstone carvings of pets, these outstanding examples of Fabergé’s unrivaled craftsmanship were exchanged between members of the royal family for anniversaries and birthdays, as well as at Christmas. Together they bear witness to both the discerning tastes of their collectors and the close ties among the British, Russian, and Danish royal families. Lavishly illustrated with more than 150 stunning, full-color photographs, Royal Fabergé is the first publication exploring Fabergé’s works from the standpoint of royal patronage and gift-giving. This volume makes extensive use of materials from both the Royal Archives and Fabergé’s own accounts to detail one of the finest collections of Fabergé’s work in existence.

Defining Deviance: Sex, Science, and Delinquent Girls, 1890-1960


Michael A. Rembis - 2011
    Drawing on exclusive access to thousands of case files and other documents at the State Training School in Geneva, Illinois, Michael A. Rembis uses Illinois as a case study to show how implementation of involuntary commitment laws in the United States reflected eugenic thinking about juvenile delinquency. Much more than an institutional history, Defining Deviance examines the cases of vulnerable young women to reveal the centrality of sex, class, gender, and disability in the formation of scientific and social reform. Rembis recounts the contestations between largely working-class teenage girls and the mostly female reformers and professionals who attempted to diagnose and treat them based on changing ideas of eugenics, gender, and impairment. He shows how generational roles and prevailing notions of gender and sexuality influenced reformers to restrict, control, and institutionalize undesirable "defectives" within society, and he details the girls' attempts to influence methods of diagnosis, discipline, and reform. In tracing the historical evolution of ideologies of impairment and gender to show the central importance of gender to the construction of disability, Rembis reveals the larger national implications of the cases at the State Training School. His study provides new insights into the treatment of young women whom the dominant society perceived as threats to the sexual and eugenic purity of modern America.

Russia: The Wild East, Part One: From Rulers to Revolutions


Martin Sixsmith - 2011
    Ivan the Terrible, Catherine the Great, Peter the Great – all left their mark on a nation that pursued expansion to the East, West and South. Many Tsars flirted with reform, but the gap between the rulers and the ruled widened until, in 1917, the doomed last Tsar, Nicholas II, abdicated. The first part of Sixsmith’s history ends with Lenin and the Bolsheviks forcing through the final Revolution and paving the way for the Communist state.Eyewitness accounts and readings from Russian authors and historians, from Pushkin to Solzhenitsyn, enhance this fascinating account, as well as music taken from a wide range of Russian composers including Glinka, Tchaikovsky, Borodin and Shostakovich.

Armies of the 19th Century: Asia. Japan and Korea


Ian Heath - 2011
    As late as the 1850s the country remained technologically and militarily stagnant, but within just 40 years - in what must rank as the most rapid and comprehensive cultural transformation in world history - it had managed not only to absorb and successfully imitate several hundred years of Western technological progress, but had become one of the late Victorian world's top ten military powers. During the same timeframe it also embraced the concept of colonialism, and with its invasion of China in 1894 and virtual occupation of Korea soon after took its first fateful steps along a road that would lead, with horrible inevitability, to head-on collision with the Allies in World War Two.The evolution of its army, arms, uniforms and tactics during the 19th century are all covered, from samurai armor to Western uniforms, and from Katana to Krupps. Korea, by contrast, participated only reluctantly in military modernization, and adopted a limited program of reform only under foreign pressure - especially Japanese, but also American, Russian and Chinese - in the closing decades of the century. Such reforms as the country attempted nevertheless proved too little and too late, and were insufficient to prevent Korea becoming first a puppet state and then a colony of its maritime neighbor. The final part of the book comprises a detailed index for the five volumes of the series published thus far.

Romanov Relations Volume One


Paul Gilbert - 2011
    Many of them dating back to the golden years of Imperial Russia have sat around collecting dust, mostly forgotten by time and neglected by researchers. Many of the authors, whom have long since passed from this world, personally knew their subjects and present them objectively to their reader in this volume. They offer both interesting anecdotes and insight into the private world of the Russian Imperial Court. Further, each volume is richly illustrated throughout, offering a selection of vintage photographs, many of which are drawn from Russian sources, and some of which may be new to readers.Volume One contains six articles, some of which are divided into numerous sub-chapters:(1) The Imperial Family of Russia by the Countess Marguerite Cunliffe-Owen(2) The Last Days of The Grand Duke Michael by the Princess Poutiatine(3) H.I.H. The Grand Duchess Elisabeth Feodorovna of Russia by the Countess Alexandra Olsoufieff(4) The Controversial Grand Duchess: An Intimate Biography of the Grand Duchess Marie Pavlovna, Senior by Christopher Heu(5) The Russian Imperial Family in Olden Times by Princess Catherine Radziwill(6) Flight from Russia by Louise Mountbatten, Queen of Sweden and includes Letters from the *Russian Imperial Family * The letters written by the Grand Duchesses Olga and Tatiana to their cousin, LouiseRomanov Relations will be enjoyed by readers who have an interest in the Romanovs and their legacy, as well as providing a useful reference to writers and historians as they continue to unravel the mysteries and dispel many of the popular held myths surrounding the Romanov dynasty.Paul Gilbert, is the Founder and Web-Site Administrator for Royal Russia: A Celebration of the Romanov Dynasty & Imperial Russia in Words and Photographs.

My Scripture Journal: Fearing the Lord


Heather Bixler - 2011
    The scripture memorizing technique offered in “My Scripture Journal” has been proven to help others memorize scripture out of the Bible.When we study the Bible we learn the tools needed in order to live a life that is pleasing to the Lord. God doesn't promise a life free from trials. However He has given us the tools we need to fight our battles through His word, the Bible. When we memorize scripture we automatically have the tools on hand that we need to get us through whatever life throws our way.“My Scripture Journal” is designed to help you memorize scripture while also learning more about God through His word. This plan for reading and memorizing scripture is designed for those of us who have either a short attention span, or busy lives, in order to help incorporate God into our everyday life!This scripture journal is set up where you will study one snippet of scripture per week. There will be seven different activities you will complete in order to help you memorize the scripture and get into the word, one activity per day of the week. At the end of the beginning of the next week we will move onto another scripture. ***** KINDLE is READING PLAN ONLY!*****My Scripture Journal: Fearing the Lord originated as a paperback journal designed to help readers memorize scripture. This reading plan was put together for readers who prefer digital readers. The reading plan you will find in this eBook copy of My Scripture Journal: Fearing the Lord includes all scriptures studied, daily activities, and discussion questions found in the paperback version of My Scripture Journal: Fearing the Lord – the only thing that is not included is the space to journal and write your daily activities.

The Parihaka Woman


Witi Ihimaera - 2011
    As her world is threatened, Erenora must find within herself the strength, courage and ingenuity to protect those whom she loves. And, like a Shakespearean heroine, she must change herself before she can take up her greatest challenge and save her exiled husband, Horitana.The Parihaka Woman is a wonderfully surprising, inventive and deeply moving riff on fact and fiction, history and imagination from one of New Zealand's finest and most memorable storytellers.

An American Betrayal: Cherokee Patriots and the Trail of Tears


Daniel Blake Smith - 2011
    Despite the Cherokees' efforts to assimilate with the dominant white culture—running their own newspaper, ratifying a constitution based on that of the United States—they were never able to integrate fully with white men in the New World.In An American Betrayal, Daniel Blake Smith's vivid prose brings to life a host of memorable characters: the veteran Indian-fighter Andrew Jackson, who adopted a young Indian boy into his home; Chief John Ross, only one-eighth Cherokee, who commanded the loyalty of most Cherokees because of his relentless effort to remain on their native soil; most dramatically, the dissenters in Cherokee country—especially Elias Boudinot and John Ridge, gifted young men who were educated in a New England academy but whose marriages to local white girls erupted in racial epithets, effigy burnings, and the closing of the school.Smith, an award-winning historian, offers an eye-opening view of why neither assimilation nor Cherokee independence could succeed in Jacksonian America.

Queequeg's Coffin: Indigenous Literacies and Early American Literature


Birgit Brander Rasmussen - 2011
    That perception ignores the many indigenous forms of writing that were not alphabet-based, such as Mayan pictoglyphs, Iroquois wampum, Ojibwe birch-bark scrolls, and Incan quipus. Queequeg's Coffin offers a new definition of writing that comprehends the dazzling diversity of literature in the Americas before and after European arrivals. This groundbreaking study recovers previously overlooked moments of textual reciprocity in the colonial sphere, from a 1645 French-Haudenosaunee Peace Council to Herman Melville's youthful encounters with Polynesian hieroglyphics.By recovering the literatures and textual practices that were indigenous to the Americas, Birgit Brander Rasmussen reimagines the colonial conflict as one organized by alternative but equally rich forms of literacy. From central Mexico to the northeastern shores of North America, in the Andes and across the American continents, indigenous peoples and European newcomers engaged each other in dialogues about ways of writing and recording knowledge. In Queequeg's Coffin, such exchanges become the foundation for a new kind of early American literary studies.

A Matter of Honour: The Life, Campaigns and Generalship of Isaac Brock


Jonathon Riley - 2011
    He has been revered as the Savior of Upper Canada. Brock was a resourceful field commander who believed in offensive measures to keep his opponent off-balance and is probably best known in the United States for managing to cow U.S. General William Hull into surrendering Detroit, to that general's eternal shame. Jonathon Riley describes Brock's early days in the Channel Islands and his military career in Europe and the West Indies. He covers in detail how Brock prepared for war with the United States, the events of the capture of Detroit as well as the Battle of Queenston Heights, which cost Brock his life but from which he emerged as a major historical figure. The book includes an assessment of Brock's abilities as a general by an author who is himself a general with experience in various theaters of war.