Best of
20th-Century

1995

Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind: The Complete Series


Hayao Miyazaki - 1995
    A modern masterpiece, the entire series is now available in this deluxe box set containing two hardcover volumes with interior color pages and a bonus poster.

The Magician's Nephew / The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe / The Horse and His Boy


C.S. Lewis - 1995
    Here, Winter and the White Witch are thegreatest threats and the children must join forces with thegreat lion, Aslan, to battle against the evil enchantment.In The Horse and His Boy, Shasta, the slave boy,meets Bree, a talking horse, and together they flee on awild and dangerous journey through strange cities,eerie tombs and harsh deserts - in search of Narnia,where there is freedom and safety.This volume brings together the first three booksof the timeless fantasy series.

The Complete Stories


Franz Kafka - 1995
    With the exception of his three novels, the whole of Kafka’s narrative work is included in this volume. --penguinrandomhouse.comTwo Introductory parables: Before the law --Imperial message --Longer stories: Description of a struggle --Wedding preparations in the country --Judgment --Metamorphosis --In the penal colony --Village schoolmaster (The giant mole) --Blumfeld, and elderly bachelor --Warden of the tomb --Country doctor --Hunter Gracchus --Hunter Gracchus: A fragment --Great Wall of China --News of the building of the wall: A fragment --Report to an academy --Report to an academy: Two fragments --Refusal --Hunger artist --Investigations of a dog --Little woman --The burrow --Josephine the singer, or the mouse folk --Children on a country road --The trees --Clothes --Excursion into the mountains --Rejection --The street window --The tradesman --Absent-minded window-gazing --The way home --Passers-by --On the tram --Reflections for gentlemen-jockeys --The wish to be a red Indian --Unhappiness --Bachelor's ill luck --Unmasking a confidence trickster --The sudden walk --Resolutions --A dream --Up in the gallery --A fratricide --The next village --A visit to a mine --Jackals and Arabs --The bridge --The bucket rider --The new advocate --An old manuscript --The knock at the manor gate --Eleven sons --My neighbor --A crossbreed (A sport) --The cares of a family man --A common confusion --The truth about Sancho Panza --The silence of the sirens --Prometheus --The city coat of arms --Poseidon --Fellowship --At night --The problem of our laws --The conscripton of troops --The test --The vulture --The helmsman --The top --A little fable --Home-coming --First sorrow --The departure --Advocates --The married couple --Give it up! --On parables.

Going to Meet the Man


James Baldwin - 1995
    But you try all kinds of ways to keep from drowning in it." The men and women in these eight short fictions grasp this truth on an elemental level, and their stories, as told by James Baldwin, detail the ingenious and often desperate ways in which they try to keep their head above water. It may be the heroin that a down-and-out jazz pianist uses to face the terror of pouring his life into an inanimate instrument. It may be the brittle piety of a father who can never forgive his son for his illegitimacy. Or it may be the screen of bigotry that a redneck deputy has raised to blunt the awful childhood memory of the day his parents took him to watch a black man being murdered by a gleeful mob.By turns haunting, heartbreaking, and horrifying--and informed throughout by Baldwin's uncanny knowledge of the wounds racism has left in both its victims and its perpetrators--Going to Meet the Man is a major work by one of our most important writers.

The Stories of Vladimir Nabokov


Vladimir Nabokov - 1995
    Written between the 1920s and 1950s, these sixty-five tales--eleven of which have been translated into English for the first time--display all the shades of Nabokov's imagination. They range from sprightly fables to bittersweet tales of loss, from claustrophobic exercises in horror to a connoisseur's samplings of the table of human folly. Read as a whole, The Stories of Vladimir Nabokov offers and intoxicating draft of the master's genius, his devious wit, and his ability to turn language into an instrument of ecstasy.The wood-sprite --Russian spoken here --Sounds --Wingstroke --Gods --A matter of chance --The seaport --Revenge --Beneficence --Details of a sunset --The thunderstorm --La veneziana --Bachmann --The dragon --Christmas --A letter that never reached Russia --The fight --The return of Chorb --A guide to Berlin --A nursery tale --Terror --Razor --The passenger --The doorbell --An affair of honor --The Christmas story --The potato elf --The aurelian --A dashing fellow --A bad day --The visit to the museum --A busy man --Terra incognita --The reunion --Lips to lips --Orache --Music --Perfection --The admiralty spire --The Leonardo --In memory of L.I. Shigaev --The circle --A Russian beauty --Breaking the news --Torpid smoke --Recruiting --A slice of life --Spring in Fialta --Cloud, castle, lake --Tyrants destroyed --Lik --Mademoiselle O --Vasiliy Shishkov --Ultima Thule --Solus Rex --The assistant producer --That in aleppo once --A forgotten poet --Time and ebb --Conversation piece, 1945 --Signs and symbols --First love --Scenes from the life of a double monster --The Vane sisters --Lance.

Evangelium Vitae: The Gospel of Life


John Paul II - 1995
    Lovingly received day by the Church, it is to be preached with dauntless fidelity as good news to the people of every age and culture.

The Betsy-Tacy Treasury


Maud Hart Lovelace - 1995
    The first four books in the Betsy-Tacy series: Betsy-Tacy, Betsy-Tacy and Tib, Betsy and Tacy Go over the Big Hill, and Betsy and Tacy Go Downtown.

Later Novels and Other Writings: The Lady in the Lake / The Little Sister / The Long Goodbye / Playback / Double Indemnity (screenplay) / Selected Essays and Letters


Raymond Chandler - 1995
    In the process, he transformed both crime writing and the American language.Written during the war, The Lady in the Lake (1943) takes Philip Marlowe out of the seamy L.A. streets to the deceptive tranquility of the surrounding mountains, as the search for a businessman’s missing wife expands into an elegy of loneliness and loss. The darker tone typical of Chandler’s later fiction is evident in The Little Sister (1949), in which an ambitious starlet, a blackmailer, and a seemingly naïve young woman from Manhattan, Kansas, are the key players in a plot that provides fuel for a bitter indictment of Hollywood and Chandler’s most savage portrayal of his adopted city.The Long Goodbye (1953), his most ambitious and self-revealing novel, uncovers a more anguished resonance in the Marlowe character, in a plot that hinges on the betrayal of friendship and the compromises of middle age. Playback (1958), written originally as a screenplay, is Chandler’s seventh and last novel.A special feature of this volume is Chandler’s long-unavailable screenplay for the film noir classic, Double Indemnity (1944), adapted from James M. Cain’s novel. Written with director Billy Wilder, it is one of the best screenplays in American cinema, masterful in construction and dialogue. Supplementing the volume, and providing a more personal glimpse of Chandler’s personality, is a selection of letters and essays—including “The Simple Art of Murder,” in which Chandler muses on his pulp roots and on the special qualities of his hero and style.

The Man Without Qualities


Robert Musil - 1995
    This new translation--published in two elegant volumes--is the first to present Musil's complete text, including material that remained unpublished during his lifetime.

The Complete Short Prose, 1929-1989


Samuel Beckett - 1995
    A tremendously influential poet and dramatist, Beckett spoke of his prose fiction as the "important writing", the medium in which his ideas were most powerfully distilled. Here, for the first time, his short prose is gathered in a definitive, complete volume, by leading Beckett scholar S.E. Gontarski.

Extinction


Thomas Bernhard - 1995
    Extinction, his last novel, takes the form of the autobiographical testimony of Franz-Josef Murau. The intellectual black sheep of a powerful Austrian land-owning family, Murau lives in self-exile in Rome. Obsessed and angry with his identity as an Austrian, he resolves never to return to the family estate of Wolfsegg. But when news comes of his parents' deaths, he finds himself master of Wolfsegg and must decide its fate.Written in Bernhard's seamless style, Extinction is the ultimate proof of his extraordinary literary genius.

I've Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle, With a New Preface


Charles M. Payne - 1995
    This momentous work offers a groundbreaking history of the early civil rights movement in the South with new material that situates the book in the context of subsequent movement literature.

A Dance to the Music of Time: 3rd Movement


Anthony Powell - 1995
    Hailed by Time as "brilliant literary comedy as well as a brilliant sketch of the times," A Dance to the Music of Time opens just after World War I. Amid the fever of the 1920s and the first chill of the 1930s, Nick Jenkins and his friends confront sex, society, business, and art. In the second volume they move to London in a whirl of marriage and adulteries, fashions and frivolities, personal triumphs and failures. These books "provide an unsurpassed picture, at once gay and melancholy, of social and artistic life in Britain between the wars" (Arthur Schlesinger, Jr.). The third volume follows Nick into army life and evokes London during the blitz. In the climactic final volume, England has won the war and must now count the losses.In this third volume of A Dance to the Music of Time, we again meet Widmerpool, doggedly rising in rank; Jenkins, shifted from one dismal army post to another; Stringham, heroically emerging from alcoholism; Templer, still on his eternal sexual quest. Here, too, we are introduced to Pamela Flitton, one of the most beautiful and dangerous women in modern fiction. Wickedly barbed in its wit, uncanny in its seismographic recording of human emotions and social currents, this saga stands as an unsurpassed rendering of England's finest yet most costly hour.Includes these novels:The Valley of BonesThe Soldier's ArtThe Military Philosophers"Anthony Powell is the best living English novelist by far. His admirers are addicts, let us face it, held in thrall by a magician."—Chicago Tribune"A book which creates a world and explores it in depth, which ponders changing relationships and values, which creates brilliantly living and diverse characters and then watches them grow and change in their milieu. . . . Powell's world is as large and as complex as Proust's."—Elizabeth Janeway, New York Times"One of the most important works of fiction since the Second World War. . . . The novel looked, as it began, something like a comedy of manners; then, for a while, like a tragedy of manners; now like a vastly entertaining, deeply melancholy, yet somehow courageous statement about human experience."—Naomi Bliven, New Yorker

The Value in the Valley: A Black Woman's Guide Through Life's Dilemmas


Iyanla Vanzant - 1995
    If you are an honorary member of the Black Woman's Suffering Society, you have probably been told that it's all your fault. Or that struggling and suffering is your lot in life. Iyanla Vanzant says, No! Life is an Act of Faith and suffering is optional! Those everyday challenges, obstacles, and dilemmas are what Iyanla calls "valleys." As bad as they may seem, there is a purpose or, as Iyanla says, "There is so much value in the valley."If you've ever been disappointed, betrayed, rejected, abandoned, or just plain old scared to let go, then you've been or may still be in a valley. Iyanla knows -- she's been there and on a bad day she's still there, but now she shares the way out with you.

A Barrel of Laughs, a Vale of Tears


Jules Feiffer - 1995
    A prince who makes everyone laugh is sent on a quest to turn him into a person worthy of being a king, but he gets everything wrong except for the meaning of life.

Battleground / Line Of Fire / Close Combat


W.E.B. Griffin - 1995
    Griffin's best-selling series. Millions of readers have been swept away by W.E.B. Griffin's remarkable novels of the Marine Corps, a saga filled with crackling realism and adventure, rich characters, real heroes, and a special flair for the military heart and mind. Here, together for the first time, are books IV,V, and VI of that series: Battleground, Line of Fire, and Close Combat. Together, these three novels present an epic tale of the battle between American and Japanese forces for the Solomon Islands in 1942. A general on a ticklish diplomatic mission finds himself in harm's way A first lieutenant, twenty-one years old but already one of only two pilots remaining from the fighter squadron's original sixteen, must learn what it is like to lead men - and to lose them A dare-devil squad attempts to rescue two Island, under the very noses of the Japanese A young private volunteers for a mission for a mission so secret he cannot be told where it is - or what he'll be doing Sweeping in scope but meticulous in detail, the books bring to life the men of the Corps - generals, colonels, and of an elite fraternity united by a tradition of courage and honor. This is The Corps.

A Dance to the Music of Time: 4th Movement


Anthony Powell - 1995
    Hailed by Time as "brilliant literary comedy as well as a brilliant sketch of the times," A Dance to the Music of Time opens just after World War I. Amid the fever of the 1920s and the first chill of the 1930s, Nick Jenkins and his friends confront sex, society, business, and art. In the second volume they move to London in a whirl of marriage and adulteries, fashions and frivolities, personal triumphs and failures. These books "provide an unsurpassed picture, at once gay and melancholy, of social and artistic life in Britain between the wars" (Arthur Schlesinger, Jr.). The third volume follows Nick into army life and evokes London during the blitz. In the climactic final volume, England has won the war and must now count the losses.In this climactic volume of A Dance to the Music of Time, Nick Jenkins describes a world of ambition, intrigue, and dissolution. England has won the war, but now the losses, physical and moral, must be counted. Pamela Widmerpool sets a snare for the young writer Trapnel, while her husband suffers private agony and public humiliation. Set against a background of politics, business, high society, and the counterculture in England and Europe, this magnificent work of art sounds an unforgettable requiem for an age.Includes these novels: Books Do Furnish a Room Temporary Kings Hearing Secret Harmonies

Arabian Nights and Days


Naguib Mahfouz - 1995
    Here are genies and flying carpets, Aladdin and Sinbad, Ali Baba, and many other familiar stories, made new by the magical pen of the acknowledged dean of Arabic letters.

Garrincha: The Triumph and Tragedy of Brazil's Forgotten Footballing Hero


Ruy Castro - 1995
    Brazil vs the fearsome USSR.In the opening three minutes - 'the greatest three minutes in the history of football' - one man wrote himself into the record books. Brazil went on to win the cup, and, in Garrincha, a star was born.Garrincha was the unlikeliest of footballers - with a right leg that turned inwards and a left that turned out, but with a ball at his feet he had the poise of an angel. He played for the love of the game, uninterested in money, and ignoring tactical advice. And he was as wild off the pitch as he was mesmerising on it - mischievous, audacious and dripping with sex appeal.It was his affair and subsequent marriage to the singer Elza Soares that caught the imagination of a nation - their mouth-watering combination of soccer and samba made them the toast of 1960s Rio. But by the age of forty-nine, Garrincha was dead, destroyed by the excesses that made him so compelling.‘Funny and moving, zealously researched and lovingly told’ Daily Telegraph

Casablanca: Script and Legend


Howard Koch - 1995
    This volume contains the complete screenplay as well as a behind-the-scenes look at how the Oscar-winning movie was made, by one of its writers, Howard Koch. Charles Champlin, Roger Ebert, Umberto Eco, and others contribute incisive analyses of the movie's timeless appeal, and twenty-five beautifully reproduced stills capture the dramatically charged scenes of this true American classic.

Nuremberg Diary


Gustave Mark Gilbert - 1995
    G. M. Gilbert, the prison psychologist, had an unrivaled firsthand opportunity to watch and question the Nazi war criminals. With scientific dispassion he encouraged Göering, Speer, Hess, Ribbentrop, Frank, Jodl, Keitel, Streicher, and the others to reveal their innermost thoughts. In the process Gilbert exposed what motivated them to create the distorted Aryan utopia and the nightmarish worlds of Auschwitz, Dachau, and Buchenwald. Here are their day-to-day reactions to the trial proceedings; their off-the-record opinions of Hitler, the Third Reich, and each other; their views on slave labor, death camps, and the Jews; their testimony, feuds, and desperate maneuverings to dissociate themselves from the Third Reich's defeat and Nazi guilt. Dr. Gilbert's thorough knowledge of German, deliberately informal approach, and complete freedom of access at all times to the defendants give his spellbinding, chilling study an intimacy and insight that remains unequaled.

Padre Pio: Man of Hope


Renzo Allegri - 1995
    Padre Pio was and is a man of hope. Throughout his life, in the midst of the most difficult trials, he always looked to the future with a spirit of optimism, faith, and love." In this intimate biography, you will see the results of this humble Capuchin's prayers and discover for yourself the Source of his great hope. A Servant Book.

Lights Out Liverpool


Maureen Lee - 1995
    And Jessica Fleming, down on her luck, is forced to return to the street she'd hoped never to see again.

Sherlock Holmes in Orbit


Mike Resnick - 1995
    All the tales contain some science fiction or fantasy element, and all remain true to the spirit and personality of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's most famous and enduring creation.

Auden: Poems


W.H. Auden - 1995
    Poems: Auden is just another reminder of his exhilarating lyric power and his understanding of love and longing in all their sacred and profane guises. One of English poetry's great 20th century masters, Poems: Auden is the short collection of an exemplary champion of human wisdom in its encounter with the mysteries of experience.

Lavender Road


Helen Carey - 1995
    As war rages, and the evacuation of Dunkirk approaches, the women of south London have their own battles to fight. Helen Carey's LONDON ROAD is a compelling novel perfect for fans of Lilian Harry, Kate Thompson and Annie Murray. September 1939 As the nation braces itself for war, the residents of Lavender Road are dealing with troubles of their own.With her husband in jail, Joyce Carter is never sure where her family's next meal will come from. And her troublesome daughter, Jen, isn't helping matters by refusing to work until she achieves her dream of becoming an actress.Pam Nelson is struggling to deny the distance growing between her and her husband - which isn't helped by her secret attraction to their handsome new lodger. And unfortunately Pam isn't the only one to fall for his seductive charm...As the threat of a German invasion looms, the lives of the women on this south London street are about to change for ever...

Der weiße Dampfer.


Chingiz Aitmatov - 1995
    Hard to Find book

Parker: Selected Stories


Dorothy Parker - 1995
    In these selected stories is the chance to draw on her insight into the social and emotional realities of life. 2 cassettes.

Nohow On: Company, Ill Seen Ill Said, Worstward Ho


Samuel Beckett - 1995
    In Company, a voice comes to "one on his back in the dark" and speaks to him. Ill Seen Ill Said focuses attention on an old woman in a cabin who is part of the objects, landscape, rhythms, and movements of an incomprehensible universe. And in Worstward Ho, Beckett explores a tentative, uncertain existence in a world devoid of rational meaning and purpose. Here is language pared down to its most expressive, confirming Beckett's position as one of the great writers of our time.

The Beastly Baby


Edward Gorey - 1995
    A calmly horrific tale about a most unpleasant infant everyone is trying to get rid of.

The Collected Essays


Ralph Ellison - 1995
    Callahan, this Modern Library Paperback Classic includes posthumously discovered reviews, criticism, and interviews, as well as the essay collections Shadow and Act (1964), hailed by Robert Penn Warren as “a body of cogent and subtle commentary on the questions that focus on race,” and Going to the Territory (1986), an exploration of literature and folklore, jazz and culture, and the nature and quality of lives that black Americans lead. “Ralph Ellison,” wrote Stanley Crouch, “reached across race, religion, class and sex to make us all Americans.”

Think a Second Time


Dennis Prager - 1995
    His extraordinarily popular radio show with the signature sign-off, "Think a second time," coupled with his own biweekly newsletter, has firmly established him as a fixture in intellectual communities nationwide. In Think a Second Time, Prager blends a rigorous and scholarly education with utterly original thinking on current events. From the dangers of idealism to the roots of extremism to his thoughts on God and an afterlife, Prager offers challenging answers to up-to-the-minute questions: Should a single woman have a child? Why don't good homes always produce good children? Is America really racist? Why does the Holocaust not negate the existence of God? Now, with an entirely new section on the precedent-setting "Baby Richard" custody case and an exploration of the issue of blood versus love, Prager continues to demonstrate his ability to draw clear moral lines in the sands of our very troubled times.

The Lost Scrapbook


Evan Dara - 1995
    The Lost Scrapbook is a novel that passionately captures the contradictory richness of our historical slot, a time when feelings of belonging and exclusion can do bitter battle. Conjuring an unforgettable variety of voices, the book delves into lives touched by this tension, before it culminates in a confrontation between a trusting city and the local manufacturing company that both sustains and betrays it. Through the use of a prismatic storytelling form, The Lost Scrapbook finds a contemporary answer to the 19th century novel, evoking an entire world in all its richness and diversity. But by embodying the sense that we can best understand our world through witnessing the interworkings of whole communities, it is also something altogether new: The Lost Scrapbook may be the first "holistic" novel.

The Daily Practice of Painting: Writings 1960-1993


Gerhard Richter - 1995
    . . . Art is wretched, cynical, stupid, helpless, confusing." -- Gerhard Richter Gerhard Richter, born in Dresden in 1932, is one of the foremost painters of his generation. A great deal has been written about the bewildering heterogeneity of his work over the past 30 years. His seemingly willful and defiant movement between abstract and figurative modes of representation and his seemingly inconsistent methods of applying paint to canvas are consistent, if nothing else, with Richter himself -- the master of the paradoxical statement. Although he has emphasized that he is first a painter and has never been a theorist, he has, throughout his career issued provocative, contentious, and memorable statements.

Before the Deluge: A Portrait of Berlin in the 1920s


Otto Friedrich - 1995
    "The City of Nets," as Brecht called Berlin, before the deluge, and people who created and those who destroyed it.

The Death of Yugoslavia


Allan Little - 1995
    The Death of Yugoslavia is a survey of the pressures and events that contributed to the break-up of former Yugoslavia, considered from a historical rather than a political or sociological point of view.

Interiors: A Black Woman's Healing...in Progress


Iyanla Vanzant - 1995
    Interiors tells of one woman's trip to insanity and her journey back--a story not of the suffering and recovery of an incest survivor, but the story of all women who suffer.

Kasper in the Glitter


Philip Ridley - 1995
    After his mother's brooch is stolen, Kasper leaves his home in the land of Nowhere and journeys to the land of Glitter and Gloom to get it back, confronting great dangers in a city ruled by a fierce orphan boy.

Understanding the Four Madhhabs


Abdal Hakim Murad - 1995
    Basing itself on the realisation that it is binding on every Muslim to follow the Qur'an and Sunna, it explains the scholars' view that this is best achieved by following great Mujtahids, and that amateur efforts to derive the Shari'a from the revealed sources will lead to distortions of the Revelation.Divided into two sections, one giving the main argument in straightforward terms, and the other providing detailed notes to back up the argument, this book is necessary reading for every Muslim who wishes to follow the Qur'an and the Sunna accurately and completely [From the book cover].

States of Injury: Power and Freedom in Late Modernity


Wendy Brown - 1995
    "Whether one is dealing with the state, the Mafia, parents, pimps, police, or husbands, " writes Brown, "the heavy price of institutionalized protection is always a measure of dependence and agreement to abide by the protector's rules." True democracy, she insists, requires sharing power, not regulation by it; freedom, not protection.Refusing any facile identification with one political position or another, Brown applies her argument to a panoply of topics, from the basis of litigiousness in political life to the appearance on the academic Left of themes of revenge and a thwarted will to power. These and other provocations in contemporary political thought and political life provide an occasion for rethinking the value of several of the last two centuries' most compelling theoretical critiques of modern political life, including the positions of Nietzsche, Marx, Weber, and Foucault.

Miss Read's Christmas Tales: Village Christmas and the Christmas Mouse


Miss Read - 1995
    In Village Christmas, a family new to Fairacre is viewed with suspicion by their elderly neighbors, the Waters sisters, until an unexpected turn of events works magic over both houses on Christmas Day. Meanwhile, Mrs. Berry, in the nearby village of Caxley, faces an equally eventful Christmas Eve in The Christmas Mouse when she is awakened by two unexpected intruders: a mouse and a bedraggled runaway boy, both taking refuge from a winter storm. Both stories are resolved in Miss Read's comforting style, as warm as the glowing coals of the cottage fire and the spirit of Christmas itself. Miss Read's Christmas Tales are a treat for those who already know Miss Read and a charming introduction to her books for those who do not. As in other books by Miss Read, this volume is complemented by John S. Goodall's delightful line drawings.

The Invisible Actor


Yoshi Oida - 1995
    He blends the oriental tradition of supreme and studied control with the Western performer's need to characterise and expose depths of emotion. In this study of the actor's art written with Lorna Marshall, Yoshi Oida provides every performer with all the simple tools which help place the technique of acting behind a cloak of invisibility. Yoshi Oida believes that once the audience becomes openly aware of the actor's method and becomes too conscious of the actor's artistry, the wonder of performance dies. The audience must never see the actor but only his or her performance.

The Politics of Rage: George Wallace, the Origins of the New Conservatism, and the Transformation of American Politics


Dan T. Carter - 1995
    Carter chronicles the dramatic rise and fall of George Wallace, a populist who abandoned his ideals to become a national symbol of racism, and latter begged for forgiveness. In The Politics of Rage, Carter argues persuasively that the four-time Alabama governor and four-time presidential candidate helped to establish the conservative political movement that put Ronald Reagan in the White House in 1980 and gave Newt Gingrich and the Republicans control of Congress in 1994. In this second edition, Carter updates Wallace's story with a look at the politician's death and the nation's reaction to it and gives a summary of his own sense of the legacy of "the most important loser in twentieth-century American politics."

Skylight


David Hare - 1995
    Skylight premiered at the National Theatre in 1995 and then went on to become one of the most internationally successful plays of recent years.This is the definitive edition of Skylight.

Images: My Life in Film


Ingmar Bergman - 1995
    Bergman's career spanned 40 years and produced over 50 films, many of which are considered classics. Over 200 photos.

Henry Miller: The Paris Years


Brassaï - 1995
    Not the Paris of the guidebooks, but the City of Light's lurid backways and backwaters, the dens of vice where he could slough off the pale cast of American puritanism and embrace the hedonistic facts of life. The Parisian life of Miller was a turbulent quest for new sensations and avenues, a roisterous, slumming exploration of the soul. This world Miller shared with Brassai, one of the greatest photographers of our century. Miller and Brassai's friendship was a recognition of kindred spirits, born of mutual admiration for each other's tireless, restless fascination with Paris and its inhabitants. In Miller, Brassai found his most compelling subject. Using unpublished letters, recollected conversations, and references to Miller's work—and featuring sixteen unforgettable examples of Brassai's photography—"Henry Miller: The Paris Years" is an intimate account of a writer's self-discovery, seen through the unblinking eye of a master photographer. Brassai delves into Miller's relationships with Anais Nin and Lawrence Durrell, as well as his hopelessly tangled though wildly inspiring marriage to June. Brassai remembers Miller's favorite cafes and haunts, revives Miller's idols and anathemas, and evokes their shared passion for the street life of a Montparnasse and Montmartre captured, even during those depression years, in a dazzling moment of illumination.

Mephisto


Klaus Mann - 1995
    In it he captures the Isherwood-like atmosphere of Nazi Germany while telling a satiric story about the rise to power of one man - a thinly veiled caricature of his own brother-in-law. The man is Hendrik Hofgen, a character actor who in his own life plays a bizarre part in the elite circle of the Third Reich. Hofgen is publicly a revolutionary, but secretly he is a man driven by an obsessive need for power and fame. Although he benefits from the prestige of being married to the daughter of an eminent politician, he endangers his rise in Nazi society by his compulsive involvement with ‘a black Venus.’ His brilliant success as Mephisto in FAUST brings him the support of the Führer’s prime minister, who appoints him head of the State Theater. His dreams are finally realized, but the story ends on a note of despair as Hofgen is forced to confront the emptiness of his life. Mann weaves his tale with amazing skill. The result is a fascinating novel of decadence and evil.Klaus Mann, the second child of Thomas Mann, was born in Munich in 1906. He began writing short stories and articles in 1924, and within a year was a theatrical critic for a Berlin newspaper. In 1925 both a volume of short stories and his first novel, THE PIOUS DANCE, were published. His sister, Erika, to whom he was very close, was in the cast of his first play, ANJA AND ESTHER. Mann left Germany in 1933 and lived in Amsterdam until 1936, during which time he became a Czechoslovakian citizen, having been deprived of his German citizenship by the Nazis. He moved to America in 1936, living in Princeton, New Jersey, and New York City. He became a U.S. citizen in 1943. He died at the age of forty-two in Cannes, France. Robin Smyth was a European correspondent for the London Observer.

Wings Of Morning: The Story Of The Last American Bomber Shot Down Over Germany In World War II


Thomas Childers - 1995
    Ten never came back. This is the story of that crew—where they came from, how they trained, what it was like to fly a B-24 through enemy flak, and who was waiting for them to come home.Historian Thomas Childers, nephew of the Black Cat's radio operator, has reconstructed the lives and tragic deaths of these men through their letters home and through in-depth interviews, both with their families and with German villagers who lived near the crash site. In so doing he unearths confusion about the exact number of crash survivors and ugly rumors of their fate at the hands of the German villagers. His search to determine what really happened leads him to the crash site outside of Regensburg to lay the mystery to rest.In the tradition of Young Men and Fire, Wings of Morning is history as commemoration-an evocation of people and events that brings to life a story of love, loss, and a family's quest for truth.

Worshipful Company of Fletchers


James Tate - 1995
    Masterfully drawing on a variety of voices and characters, James Tate joyfully offers his first book since winning the Pulitzer Prize in 1992 for his "Selected Poems."

Inventing Ireland


Declan Kiberd - 1995
    In a book unprecedented in its scope and approach, Declan Kiberd offers a vivid account of the personalities and texts, English and Irish alike, that reinvented the country after centuries of colonialism. The result is a major literary history of modern Ireland, combining detailed and daring interpretations of literary masterpieces with assessments of the wider role of language, sport, clothing, politics, and philosophy in the Irish revival.In dazzling comparisons with the experience of other postcolonial peoples, the author makes many overdue connections. Rejecting the notion that artists such as Wilde, Shaw, Yeats, Joyce, and Beckett became modern to the extent that they made themselves "European," he contends that the Irish experience was a dramatic instance of experimental modernity and shows how the country's artists blazed a trail that led directly to the magic realism of a Garc a M rquez or a Rushdie. Along the way, he reveals the vital importance of Protestant values and the immense contributions of women to the enterprise. Kiberd's analysis of the culture is interwoven with sketches of the political background, bringing the course of modern Irish literature into sharp relief against a tragic history of conflict, stagnation, and change.Inventing Ireland restores to the Irish past a sense of openness that it once had and that has since been obscured by narrow-gauge nationalists and their polemical revisionist critics. In closing, Kiberd outlines an agenda for Irish Studies in the next century and detects the signs of a second renaissance in the work of a new generation of authors and playwrights, from Brian Friel to the younger Dublin writers.

I Who Have Never Known Men


Jacqueline Harpman - 1995
    In this reality where intimacy is forbidden--in the unrelenting sameness of the artificial days and nights--she knows nothing of books and time, of needs and feelings.Then everything changes...and nothing changes.A young woman who has never known men--a child who knows of no history before the bars and restraints--must now reinvent herself, piece by piece, in a place she has never been...and in the face of the most challenging and terrifying of unknowns: freedom.

Collected Poems


Thom Gunn - 1995
    Gunn has made a speciality of playing style against subject as he deals with the out-of-control through tightly controlled meters and with the systematized through open forms.

Damascus Nights


Rafik Schami - 1995
    The most famous storyteller in Damascus, Salim, the coachman, has mysteriously lost his voice. For seven nights, his seven old friends gather to break the spell with their seven different, unique stories -- some personal, some modern, some borrowed from the past. Against the backdrop of shifting Middle Eastern politics, Schami's eight characters, lost to the Arabian nights, weave in and out of tales of wizards and princesses, of New York skyscrapers and America. With spellbinding power, Schami imparts a luscious vision of storytelling as food for thought and salve for the soul, as the glue which holds our lives together.

Thomas the Obscure


Maurice Blanchot - 1995
    Written between 1932 and 1940, Blanchot's first novel, here brilliantly translated by Robert Lamberton, contains all the remarkable aspects of his famous and perplexing invention, the ontological narrative--a tale whose subject is the nature of being itself. This paradoxical work discovers being in the absence of being, mystery in the absence of mystery, both to be searched for limitlessly. As Blanchot launches this endless search in his own masterful way, he transforms the possibilities of the novel. First issued in English in 1973 in a limited edition, this re-issue includes an illuminating essay on translation by Lamberton.

Love Letters from Cell 92


Dietrich Bonhoeffer - 1995
    This collection of correspondence between Bonhoeffer and von Wedemeyer--long anticipated but never before published--offers an understanding of a mature theologian who was in love with a 19-year-old woman.

The Haunted Land: Facing Europe's Ghosts After Communism


Tina Rosenberg - 1995
    Here, she approaches a similar theme in Eastern Europe after the fall of Communism, telling a series of riveting human stories to illuminate the paradox that rabid anti-Communism at times resembles Communism. In the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland and the former East Germany, she talks to erstwhile dissidents now victimized because they are named in old police registers; to low-level agents accused of crimes that were not crimes when committed; and to high officials who now run things just like before. She convincingly suggests that the best antidote to Communism may be, not revenge, but "tolerance and the rule of law."

Downhome: An Anthology of Southern Women Writers


Susie Mee - 1995
    Introduction by the Author.Contents:Isis by Zora Neale HurstonEconomics by Elizabeth Seydel MorganSarah by Tina McElroy AnsaStar in the valley by Mary Noailles MurfreeUgliest pilgrim by Doris BettsMusic by Ellen GilchristWide net by Eudora WeltyAfter Moore by Mary HoodWhite rat by Gayl JonesDare's gift by Ellen GlasgowFirst dark by Elizabeth SpencerShiloh by Bobbie Ann MasonGood country people by Flannery O'ConnorEveryday use by Alice WalkerYellow ribbons by Susie MeeTongues of fire by Lee SmithGospel song by Dorothy AllisonNew life by Mary Ward BrownGrave by Katherine Anne PorterAnd with a vengeance by Margaret GibsonThird of July by Elizabeth Cox

Compact Discworlds 1-4: The Colour of Magic/The Light Fantastic/Equal Rites/Mort


Terry Pratchett - 1995
    Discworld is a flat planet, supported on the backs of four elephants, who in turn stand on the back of the great turtle A'Tuin as it swims majestically through space.

The Letters of Frida Kahlo: Cartas Apasionadas


Frida Kahlo - 1995
    In over 80 missives to her friends, family, enemies, and lovers, Kahlo reveals a dark humor, striking intensity, and genuine warmth. She wrote, as her translator and editor Martha Zamora explains, "honestly and without reserve, employing all the vocabulary at her disposal to convey her thoughts and emotions." To read this selection of her passionate letters is to be awarded a glimpse into the soul of one of this century's most imaginative artists.

Stories of Scottsboro


James Goodman - 1995
    In places, Stories of Scottsboro is almost heartbreaking, not least because Goodman shows what people felt as well as what they thought." -- Washington Post Book WorldTo white Southerners, it was "a heinous and unspeakable crime" that flouted a taboo as old as slavery. To the Communist Party, which mounted the defense, the Scottsboro case was an ideal opportunity to unite issues of race and class. To jury after jury, the idea that nine black men had raped two white women on a train traveling through northern Alabama in 1931 was so self-evident that they found the Scottsboro boys guilty even after the U.S. Supreme Court had twice struck down the verdict and one of the "victims" had recanted.This innovative and grippingly narrated work of history tells the story of a case that marked a watershed in American racial justice. Or, rather, it tells several stories. For out of dozens of period sources, Stories of Scottsboro re-creates not only what happened at Scottsboro, but the dissonant chords it struck in the hearts and minds of an entire nation."Extraordinary.... To do justice to the Scottsboro story a book would have to combine edge-of-the-seat reportage and epic narrative sweep. And it is just such a book that James Goodman has given us, a beautifully realized history...written with complete authority, tight emotional control, and brilliant use of archival material." -- Chicago Tribune

Collected Stories


Peter Carey - 1995
    He is also a dazzling writer of short stories and this volume collects together all the stories from The Fat Man in History and War Crimes as well as three other stories not previously published in book form.The stories, persuasive and precisely crafted, reveal Carey to be a moralist with a sense of humour, a surrealist interested in naturalism and an urban poet delighting in paradox.Contents:- "Do You Love Me?"- The Last Days of a Famous Mime- Kristu-Du- Crabs- Life & Death in the South Side Pavilion- Room No. 5 (Escribo)- Happy Story- A Million Dollars’ Worth of Amphetamines- Peeling- A Windmill in the West- Concerning the Greek Tyrant- Withdrawal- Report on the Shadow Industry- Joe- The Puzzling Nature of Blue- Conversations with Unicorns- American Dreams- The Fat Man in History- The Uses of Williamson Wood- Exotic Pleasures- A Schoolboy Prank- The Journey of a Lifetime- The Chance- Fragrance of Roses- He Found Her in Late Summer- War Crimes- A Letter to Our Son

The Works of George Herbert


George Herbert - 1995
    Each collection has a specially commissioned introduction.

Entre Nous: Essays on Thinking-of-the-Other


Emmanuel Levinas - 1995
    Exerting a profound influence upon such thinkers as Derrida, Lyotard, Blanchot, and Irigaray, Levinas's work bridges several major gaps in the evolution of continental philosophy--between modern and postmodern, phenomenology and poststructuralism, ethics and ontology. He is credited with having spurred a revitalized interest in ethics-based philosophy throughout Europe and America.Entre Nous (Between Us) is the culmination of Levinas's philosophy. Published in France a few years before his death, it gathers his most important work and reveals the development of his thought over nearly forty years of committed inquiry. Along with several trenchant interviews published here, these essays engage with issues of suffering, love, religion, culture, justice, human rights, and legal theory. Taken together, they constitute a key to Levinas's ideas on the ethical dimensions of otherness.Working from the phenomenological method of Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger, Levinas pushed beyond the limits of their framework to argue that it is ethics, not ontology, that orients philosophy, and that responsibility precedes reasoning. Ethics for Levinas means responsibility in relation to difference. Throughout his work, Levinas returns to the metaphor of the face of the other to discuss how and where responsibility enters our lives and makes philosophy necessary. For Levinas, ethics begins with our face to face interaction with another person--seeing that person not as a reflection of one's self, nor as a threat, but as different and greater than self. Levinas moves the reader to recognize the implications of this interaction: our abiding responsibility for the other, and our concern with the other's suffering and death.Situated at the crossroads of several philosophical schools and approaches, Levinas's work illuminates a host of critical issues and has found resonances among students and scholars of literature, law, religion, and politics. Entre Nous is at once the apotheosis of his work and an accessible introduction to it. In the end, Levinas's urgent meditations upon the face of the other suggest a new foundation upon which to grasp the nature of good and evil in the tangled skein of our lives.

Exploring the Lusitania: Probing the Mysteries of the Sinking That Changed History


Robert D. Ballard - 1995
    involvement in World War I. Now, bestselling author/researcher Robert Ballard probes the decades-old controversy surrounding this pivotal maritime tragedy. Illustrated with over 300 photos, many in color, charts, paintings, and a four-page gatefold.

STATION HILL BLANCHOT READER


Maurice Blanchot - 1995
    A major collection of writings from one of the most important twentieth century French authors, "The Blanchot Reader" includes six works of fiction ("Death Sentence, The Madness of the Day, When the Time Comes, Vicious Circles, Thomas the Obscure", and "The One Who Was Standing Apart from Me") and extended selections of critical and philosophical essays from his major book, "The Gaze of Orpheus".

The Voice Of God


Cindy Jacobs - 1995
    How does God speak to His Church today? In this exciting, biblical examination of the gift of prophecy, you'll get a clear picture of what prophecy is and how it still works -- in the lives of individuals and in entire churches.

Sinatra! the Song is You: A Singer's Art


Will Friedwald - 1995
    Drawing upon recent interviews with Sinatra collaborators, arrangers, and musicians - as well as previously unpublished conversations with "The Voice" himself - author Will Friedwald chronicles this five-decade career, tracing the evolution of his vocal style from such early influences as Harry James (the bandleader who in the late thirties "discovered" Sinatra in New Jersey's Rustic Cabin), Tommy Dorsey, and Axel Stordahl, with whom Sinatra recorded his first string of solo hits. With the orchestrations of Nelson Riddle in the fifties came a more hard-swinging, uptempo Sinatra; the creation of his own label, Reprise Records, in the sixties gave him the venue to experiment with such unexpected forms as soft rock and psychedelia. Friedwald argues that Sinatra's recordings in the two decades following his 1971 to 1973 retirement weren't as prolific or as consistent as his earlier work, despite a startling comeback that culminated in the 1990s with the platinum-selling Duets discs.

Palimpsest


Gore Vidal - 1995
    Published to celebrate his 70th birthday, the memoirs of the American writer, from his childhood as the grandson of a blind southern senator, through to the establishment of his literary career in 1964.

Manitous: The Spiritual World Of The Ojibway


Basil Johnston - 1995
    With depth and humor, Johnston tells how lasting tradition was brought to the Ojibway by four half-human brothers, including Nana'b'oozoo, the beloved archetypal being who means well but often blunders. He also relates how people are helped and hindered by other entities, such as the manitous of the forests and meadows, personal manitous and totems, mermen and merwomen, Pauguk (the cursed Flying Skeleton), and the Weendigoes, famed and terrifying giant cannibals.

The Eye of the Prophet


Kahlil Gibran - 1995
    Here Gibran is the poetic, philosophical moralist, grounded in Islam, Buddhism, and Christianity, questing for the best in humanity, refusing to separate man from the natural world. The ordinary work and life of man has the potential to be inherently noble, Gibran believes, if man could only enact his affairs with the sublimity of nature's creations. The Eye of the Prophet is a treasury of wisdom, lyrical joy, and inspiration. With its forceful and rhythmic language, it speaks to our challenging times as a worthy companion to the The Prophet.

A Place in Space: Ethics, Aesthetics, and Watersheds


Gary Snyder - 1995
    Displaying Snyders playful and subtle intellect, these pieces challenge commonly held attitudes toward the environment and local communities, and call for action to give moral standing to all beings.

The Advanced Montessori Method II (Clio Montessori)


Maria Montessori - 1995
    We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

Rumpole and the younger generation


John Mortimer - 1995
    In reminiscent mood, Horace Rumpole, barrister, looks back to his successful defence of 16-year-old Jim Timson, member of a large and industrious family of south London.

Imagining Characters: Six Conversations About Women Writers: Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, George Eliot, Willa Cather, Iris Murdoch, and Toni Morrison


A.S. Byatt - 1995
    The results are nothing less than an education in the ways literature grips its readers and, at times, transforms their lives. Imagining Characters is indispensable, a work of criticism that returns us to the books it discusses with renewed respect and wonder.

The Walter Mosley Omnibus: Devil In A Blue Dress, A Red Death, White Butterfly.


Walter Mosley - 1995
    This anthology contains: Devil in a Blue Dress; A Red Death; and White Butterfly.

Shadows of Tender Fury


Subcomandante Marcos - 1995
    Here are the words of Marcos, words that recast Mexican politics and revived rebel imaginations everywhere. They look back to the traditions of Indian resistance and the dormant ideals of the Mexican revolution; they look forward to political strategies, styles, and theories that challenge the dominance of capitalism. The Introduction by John Ross situates the Zapatistas in the context of Mexican history and the Afterword by Frank Bardacke discusses their language and politics, as well as their meaning for the U.S. left. This edition also includes an "exclusive" prologue by Subcomandante Marcos and his speech to the Zapatista's August 1994 national convention.

The Temptation of Innocence - Living in the Age of Entitlement


Pascal Bruckner - 1995
    This highly insightful essay dissects the culture of dependency and its damaging effects on the moral fiber of society, from corporate welfare to affirmative action.

Figuring the Sacred: Religion, Narrative & Imagination


Paul Ricœur - 1995
    Introduced by Mark Wallace, the twenty-one papers collected in this volume-some familiar, many translated here for the first time-constitute the most comprehensive anthology of Ricoeur's writings in religion since 1970. The writings are thematically divided into five parts: the study of religion philosophers of religion the Bible and genre theological overtures practical theology Ricoeur's hermeneutical orientation and his deep sensitivity to the mystery and power of religious language offer fresh insight into the transformative potential of sacred literature, including the Bible.

Love Me Do!: Beatles Progress


Michael Braun - 1995
    John, Paul, George and Ringo celebrate their new found success with a hectic six-week tour, briefly interrupted by an historic live appearance at the "Royal Variety Performance" at the London Palladium. This is the beginning of "Beatlemania" and American writer, Mike Braun, is there to chronicle events and watch as the drama unfolds. A year later, The Beatles are the world's biggest pop group. This book details what really happened in those first magic weeks.

The Impossible Country: A Journey Through the Last Days of Yugoslavia


Brian Hall - 1995
    . . presented with sympathy and frequently with humor . . . [of] a disparate people who were never united except by their resentment of a foreign conqueror." - Atlantic MonthlyIn The Impossible Country, Brian Hall relates his encounters with Serbs, Croats, and Muslims-- "real people, likeable people" who are now overcome with suspicion and anxiety about one another. Hall takes the standard explanations, the pundits' predictions, and the evening news footage and inverts our perceptions of the country, its politics, its history, and its seemingly insoluble animosities.

Poetics of Cinema


Raúl Ruiz - 1995
    In Poetics of Cinema, Ruiz takes a fresh approach to the major themes haunting our audio-visual civilization: the filmic unconscious, questions of utopia, the inter-contamination of images, the art of the copy, the relations between artistic practices and institutions. Based on a series of lectures given recently at Duke University in North Carolina, Poetics of Cinema develops an acerbically witty critique of the reigning codes of cinematographic narration, principally derived from the dramatic theories set forth by Aristotle's Poetics and characterized by Ruiz as the -central-conflict theory.- Ruiz's impressive knowledge of theology, philosophy, literature and the visual arts never outstrips his powerful imagination. Poetics of Cinema not only offers a singularly pertinent analysis of the seventh art, but also shows us an entirely new way of writing and thinking about images.

Shallow Graves in Siberia


Michael Krupa - 1995
    He ran away before taking his final vows and joined the army. Soon afterwards, the German tanks rolled into Poland and easily defeated her antiquated forces - the Polish cavalry were armed with sabres. Krupa survived Hitler's invasion, but was arrested in Soviet-occupied eastern Poland and accused of spying. After enduring torture in Moscow's notorious Lubianka prison, he was sentenced to ten years' corrective labour and deported to the Pechora Gulag. Most prisoners there were worked and starved to death within a year. But Krupa managed again to escape, and in the chaos following the Nazi invasion of the Soviet Union made one of the most extraordinary journeys of the war - from Siberia to safety in Afghanistan. Krupa's Jesuit training had given him an inner strength and resilience which enabled him to survive in the face of appalling brutality and cruelty. Luck and the kindness of strangers helped him complete his epic journey to freedom. The story of the suffering inflicted on millions in Stalin's camps has been told before - but Krupa's story is remarkable and uni

Blacker Than a Thousand Midnights


Susan Straight - 1995
    In Blacker Than a Thousand Midnights, she fulfills the promise of the earlier book, and reintroduces readers to the inhabitants of fictional Rio Seco, California. This is the story of Darnell Tucker, and black firefighter and workingman trying to work the toughest turf of all: the straight and narrow. As his friends disappear around him - victims of the streets, of police dogs, of drugs, of an addiction to cheap thrills and guns - Darnell struggles to establish his own business, facing a thousand midnights before he's home free, with a job that supports his young family. Yet even as he gains a tentative sense of self, Darnell Tucker is drawn to the destructive beauty of fires, and to the wilder, untamed forces beyond the structure of domesticity. This search for balance in a dangerous world propels the quiet heroism of a beautifully evoked and very moving story.

The Arabists: The Romance of an American Elite


Robert D. Kaplan - 1995
    Known to Foreign Service colleagues as "the Arabists," these were the men and women who had spent much of their lives, usually with their families, living in the Arab world as diplomats, military attaches, intelligence agents, and educators. Descended from the missionaries, scholars, and explorers who first ventured into the region - an offshoot of the WASP elite that ruled America during the nineteenth century - the Arabists were an exclusive caste linked by complex social, institutional, and family ties. Thoroughly at home in Arab cultures and often enjoying relations of longstanding intimacy with the monarchs and ruling elites of Arab countries, these American expatriates lived a charmed lifestyle that has become a source of intense nostalgia among the Arabists themselves as well as a symbol of their romance with Arab culture and increasing isolation from American society and interests. The Arabists dominated American policy and shaped our perception of the Arab world throughout the colonial and interwar periods. But after World War II, the diplomatic corps began to change, reflecting the country's new ethnic and social diversity. Kaplan describes the impact of this change within the State Department, showing how the advent of Irish Catholics, Jews, and Harvard-trained regional experts created internal pressures that slowly loosened the Arabists' grip on Middle East diplomacy in the postwar period. Drawing on interviews, memoirs, and other official and private sources, Kaplan reconstructs the hundred-year history of the Arabist elite, and traces their decline against the background of this social transformation.

Distortions


Ann Beattie - 1995
    Beattie captures perfectly the profound longings that came to define an entire generation with insight, compassion, and humor.

The Work of Fire


Maurice Blanchot - 1995
    Blanchot developed a distinctive, limpid form of essay writing; these essays, in form and substance, left their imprint on the work of the most influential French theorists. The writings of Barthes, Foucault, and Derrida are unimaginable without Blanchot.

Queer and Loathing: Rants and Raves of a Raging AIDS Clone


David B. Feinberg - 1995
    Feinberg in this stunning nonfiction debut - a collection of autobiographical essays, gonzo journalism, and demented Feinbergian lists about AIDS activism and living, writing, and dying with AIDS. With the startling blend of satiric wit and pathos, black humor and heroism, found in his widely acclaimed and iconoclastic novels, he charts a harrowing personal journey down that "HIV highway to hell.

Iced


Ray Shell - 1995
    "A powerhouse".--Maya Angelou.

Film Posters of the Russian Avant-Garde


Susan Pack - 1995
    This book represents a survey of these works.

Plants of the Western Boreal Forest & Aspen Parkland


Derek Johnson - 1995
    Over 620 species of trees, shrubs, wildflowers, grasses, ferns, mosses and lichens are illustrated and described, covering the northern forest from Alaska to Minnesota.

The Spivak Reader: Selected Works


Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak - 1995
    Although her rigorous reading of various authors has often rendered her work difficult terrain for those unfamiliar with poststructuralism, this collection makes significant strides in explicating Spivak's complicated theories of reading.

Dodsworth


Sinclair Lewis - 1995
    When the woman becomes involved with another man, her husband must choose between forgiving his wife or abandoning the relationship, & Europe, forever.

The Cotton-Pickers


B. Traven - 1995
    Gales, a laconic American drifter, turns his hand to anything for a meal and a flea-bitten bunk--he works on a cotton plantation, in an oil field, in a bakery, as a cowboy for a North American ranch owner. Opposing exploitation, he leaves behind him a trail of rebellion. Underlying this lively and funny tale of his adventures is a powerful study of social injustice, and most of all a testament to the strength of human courage and dignity one of Traven's favorite themes. "B. Traven is coming to be recognized as one of the narrative masters of the twentieth century."--New York Times Book Review. "Great storytellers often arise like Judaic just men to exemplify and rehearse the truth for their generation. The elusive B. Traven was just such a man."--Book World.

Wood of the Cradle, Wood of the Cross


Caryll Houselander - 1995
    Caryll Houselander, author of the classic The Reed of God, explains in these beautiful pages how the infant Christ shows us a "little way to holiness." It's the art of making oneself small before the loving majesty of God, and it leads readers straight to His heart.

A Boat in Our Baggage: Around the World with a Kayak


Maria Coffey - 1995
    Unlike many travelers, they talked to the natives of these places about politics, religion, and economics, with good-humored though often sobering results. Fresh, frank, and observant, this is a wonderful piece of travel writing.

Fascism


Roger Griffin - 1995
    It has been identified with totalitarianism, state terror, fanaticism, orchestrated violence, and blind obedience, and was directly associated with the horrors of the Second World War, which left more than 40 million dead and introduced inconceivable notions of inhumanity. The mere mention of the term today evokes visions of atrocities and ineffable cruelty. Yet, the end of the twentieth century appears to have spawned a renewed interest in fascism, suggesting that it is time for us to examine our understanding of its ideas, ideals, and inequities. Edited by Roger Griffin, described as 'the premier theorist {of fascism} of the younger generation' (Contemporary European History), this important Oxford Reader demonstrates why fascism strongly appeals to many people, and how dangerous the result of this fascination may be. It includes a wide selection of texts written by fascist thinkers and propagandists, as well as by prominent anti-fascists from both inside and outside Europe, before and after the Second World War. Included are texts on fascism in Germany and Italy, on the abortive pre-1945 fascisms in more than a dozen countries around the world, on reactions to fascism, and on post-war and contemporary fascism. With contributions from writers as diverse as Benito Mussolini and Primo Levi, Joseph Goebbels and George Orwell, Martin Heidegger and Max Horkheimer, this compelling anthology provides insight into the depths and breadths of the destructive repercussions of fascist ideology. In no other volume will students of political theory, history, sociology, and psychology have access to such a compendium of key texts on this simultaneoulsy intriguing and frightening political force.

Snipp, Snapp, Snurr and the Buttered Bread


Maj Lindman - 1995
    But Mother can't make butter without milk. Aunt Annie's cow, Blossom, can't make milk without good grass to eat, and the grass won't grow without the sun to shine on it.

Smile Please: An Unfinished Autobiography


Jean Rhys - 1995
    From the early days on Dominica to the bleak time in England, living in bedsits on gin and little else, to Paris with her first husband, this is a lasting memorial to a unique artist.

Christianity and Classical Culture: The Metamorphosis of Natural Theology in the Christian Encounter with Hellenism


Jaroslav Pelikan - 1995
    In this erudite and informative book, a distinguished scholar provides the first coherent account of the lives and writings of these so-called Cappadocians, showing how they managed to be Greek and Christian at the same time.

The Vintage Book of Contemporary Irish Fiction


Dermot Bolger - 1995
    This collection of astonishing breadth reveals a literature of genuine global stature, as ancient as the Irish Sea. Contributors and stories include: John Banville, from Mefisto; Leland Bardwell, "The Hairdresser"; Sebastian Barry, from The Engine of Owl-Light; Mary Beckett, "Heaven"; Samuel Beckett, "For to End Yet Again"; Sara Berkeley, "The Sky's Gone Out"; Dermot Bolger, "The Journey Home"; Claire Boylan, "Villa Marta"; Shane Connaughton, "Ojus"; Mary Dorcey, "The Husband"; Roddy Doyle, from The Snapper; Anne Enright, "Men and Angels"; Hugo Hamilton, from Surrogate City; Dermot Healy, "The Death of Matti Bonner"; Aidan Higgins, from Balcony of Europe; Desmond Hogan, from A Curious Street; Jennifer Johnston, from The Christmas Tree; Neil Jordan, "Last Rights"; Molly Kean, Patrick McCabe, from The Butcher Boy; Brian Moore, "The Sight"; Edna O'Brien, "What a Sky"; William Trevor, "The Ballroom of Romance"; Val Mulkerns, "Memory and Desire"; Robert McLiam Wilson, from Ripley Bogle, and many more.