Best of
Disability

2010

Out of My Mind


Sharon M. Draper - 2010
    She cannot walk or talk, but she has a photographic memory; she can remember every detail of everything she has ever experienced. She is smarter than most of the adults who try to diagnose her and smarter than her classmates in her integrated classroom - the very same classmates who dismiss her as mentally challenged because she cannot tell them otherwise. But Melody refuses to be defined by cerebral palsy. And she's determined to let everyone know it - somehow. In this breakthrough story, reminiscent of The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, from multiple Coretta Scott King Award-winner Sharon Draper, readers will come to know a brilliant mind and a brave spirit who will change forever how they look at anyone with a disability.

My Brother Charlie


Holly Robinson Peete - 2010
    He's good at so many things — swimming, playing the piano, running fast. And Charlie has a special way with animals, especially their dog, Harriett. But sometimes Charlie gets very quiet. His words get locked inside him, and he seems far away. Then, when Callie and Charlie start to play, Charlie is back to laughing, holding hands, having fun. Charlie is like any other boy — except he has autism.In this story, told from a sister's point of view, we meet a family whose oldest son teaches them important lessons about togetherness, hope, tolerance, and love.

How to Be Sick: A Buddhist-Inspired Guide for the Chronically Ill and Their Caregivers


Toni Bernhard - 2010
    And it can also be the perfect gift of guidance, encouragement, and uplifting inspiration to family, friends, and loved ones struggling with the many terrifying or disheartening life changes that come so close on the heels of a diagnosis of a chronic condition or even a life-threatening illness.The author, who became ill while a university law professor in the prime of her career, tells the reader how she got sick and, to her and her partner's bewilderment, stayed that way. Toni had been a longtime meditator, going on long meditation retreats and spending many hours rigorously practicing, but soon discovered that she simply could no longer engage in those difficult and taxing forms. She had to learn ways to make "being sick" the heart of her spiritual practice and, through truly learning how to be sick, she learned how, even with many physical and energetic limitations, to live a life of equanimity, compassion, and joy. Whether we ourselves are sick now or not, we can learn these vital arts of living well from How to Be Sick.

Dancing with Max: A Mother and Son Who Broke Free


Emily Colson - 2010
    Max doesn’t communicate like we do. But he communicates better than we do about the most important things. Max doesn’t think like we do. But his actions reflect deep spiritual truths. With candor and wit, Emily Colson shares about her personal battles and heartbreak when, as a suddenly single mother, she discovers her only child has autism. Emily illuminates the page with imagery—making you laugh, making you cry, inspiring you to face your own challenges. Chuck Colson, in his most personal writing since Born Again, speaks as a father and grandfather. It is a tender side Max brings out of his grandfather, a side some haven’t seen. As Emily recalls her experiences, we discover that Max’s disability does not so much define who he is, but reveals who we are. Dancing with Max is not a fairy tale with a magical ending. It’s a real life story of grace and second chances and fresh starts in spite of life’s hardest problems. And Max? Max will make you fall in love with life all over again, leaving you dancing with joy.

Knowing Jesse: A Mother's Story of Grief, Grace, and Everyday Bliss


Marianne Leone - 2010
    He also had severe cerebral palsy and was quadriplegic, unable to speak, and wracked by seizures. He died suddenly at age seventeen.In fiercely honest, surprisingly funny, and sometimes heartbreaking prose, Jesse’s mother, Marianne Leone, chronicles her transformation by the remarkable life and untimely death of her child. An unforgettable memoir of joy, grief, and triumph, Knowing Jesse unlocks the secret of unconditional love and speaks to all families who strive to do right by their children.

Devoted: The Story of a Father's Love for His Son


Dick Hoyt - 2010
    Born a spastic quadraplegic, Rick Hoyt was written off by numerous doctors. They advised his parents, Dick and Judy, to put their firstborn son in an institution. But Rick’s parents refused. Determined to give their son every opportunity that “normal” kids had, they made sure to include Rick in everything they did, especially with their other two sons, Rob and Russ. But home was one thing, the world at large, another. Repeatedly rebuffed by school administrators who resisted their attempts to enroll Rick in school, Rick’s mother worked tirelessly to help pass a landmark bill, Chapter 766, the first special-education reform law in the country. As a result, Rick and other physically disabled kids were able to attend public school in Massachusetts. But how would Rick communicate when he couldn’t talk? To overcome this daunting obstacle, Dick and Judy worked with Dr. William Crochetiere, then chairman of the engineering department at Tufts University, and several enterprising graduate students, including Rick Foulds, to create the Tufts Interactive Communication device (TCI). In the Hoyt household, it became known as the “Hope machine,” as it enabled Rick to create sentences by pressing his head against a metal bar. For the first time ever, Rick was able to communicate. Then one day Rick asked his dad to enter a charity race, but there was a twist. Rick wanted to run too. Dick had never run a race before, but more challenging still, he would have to push his son’s wheelchair at the same time. But once again, the Hoyts were determined to overcome whatever obstacle was put in their way. Now, over one thousand races later, including numerous marathons and triathlons, Dick Hoyt continues to push Rick’s wheelchair. Affectionately known worldwide as Team Hoyt, they are as devoted as ever, continuing to inspire millions and embodying their trademark motto of “Yes, you can.”

Keep Me in Your Heart: Letting Go of Lisa / Saving Jessica / Telling Christina Goodbye


Lurlene McDaniel - 2010
    Readers will relate to the compassion and strength of the characters as they piece their lives back together after tragedy strikes. Letting Go of Lisa Nathan Malone has been home schooled his whole life. He hasn't spent much time with kids his own age, let alone dated. Now that his mother is busy with his new twin sisters, he must enroll at the local high school for his senior year. On the first day of school a girl catches his eye. Lisa is a loner and doesn't care what anybody thinks of her. Nathan is intrigued. When he and Lisa finally start spending time together, he is the happiest he's ever been. But Lisa has a tragic secret and when she decides to deal with it herself, Nathan has to make a choice. Can he ever let go of Lisa? Saving Jessica Jessica McMillan and Jeremy Travino are a perfect couple. When they met in high school, Jessica's upbeat spirit helped Jeremy to see that there must be a reason he was spared in the car accident that killed his brother. But now Jessica has been diagnosed with kidney failure. Her only hope is a kidney transplant but no one in her family is a match. Jeremy can't watch another person he loves die. He believes that his life was spared so he could save Jessica by donating a kidney. But his parents are terrified of losing their only child. Will Jeremy go against his parents' wishes to do what he must to save Jessica? Telling Christina Goodbye Trisha Thompson and her best friend, Christina, are having a great senior year. Trisha and her boyfriend are making plans to attend Indiana University, and Christina received a scholarship to the University of Vermont. Everything would be perfect if only Trisha got along with Christina's controlling boyfriend, Tucker, who is trying to convince Christina not to go away for college. Their lives are forever changed when one night Tucker drives them all home from a basketball game. He hits black ice and the car overturns. Tucker walks away with barely a scratch, but Trisha is injured, Cody is in a coma, and Christina is dead. Those that are left must learn to heal, in order for their lives to move on.

Friendship at the Margins: Discovering Mutuality in Service and Mission


Christopher L. Heuertz - 2010
    But sometimes Christians inadvertently marginalize and objectify the very ones they most want to serve. Chris Heuertz, international director of Word Made Flesh, and theologian and ethicist Christine Pohl show how friendship is a Christian vocation that can bring reconciliation and healing to our broken world. They contend that unlikely friendships are at the center of an alternative paradigm for mission, where people are not objectified as potential converts but encountered in a relationship of mutuality and reciprocity. When we befriend those on the margins of society by practicing hospitality and welcome, we create communities where righteousness and justice can be lived out. Heuertz and Pohl's reflections offer fresh insight into Christian mission and what it means to be the church in the world today.

Free as a Bird


Gina McMurchy-Barber - 2010
    I never learnt much bout ledders and numbers, an I sure never got to go home."It's here in an institution that opened in 1878 and was originally called the Provincial Lunatic Asylum that Ruby Jean learns to survive isolation, boredom, and every kind of abuse. Just when she can hardly remember if she's ever been happy, she learns a lesson about patience and perseverance from an old crow.

Someone Like Me: An Unlikely Story of Challenge and Triumph Over Cerebral Palsy


John W. Quinn - 2010
    He kept his cerebral palsy a secret from the record- keepers and medical authorities for 20 years. He had a distinguished and highly decorated career despite the pain he endured to appear normal.He served on board destroyers, a battleship, two aircraft carriers and functioned as an administrator for a Seal unit. The outside world also impacted on him further aggravating his CP when he was challenged by alcoholism and excessive grief caused by the suicide of a brother. With help, John Quinn triumphed over both, as he did the painful cerebral palsy.

Beyond Inclusion, Beyond Empowerment


Leticia Nieto - 2010
    and co-authors, brings a long-awaited breakthrough to the fields of liberation and cultural studies. Nieto offers a powerful analysis of the psychological dynamics of oppression and privilege, and shows readers how to develop the skills that can promote social justice for themselves and those around them.A key metaphor in Beyond Inclusion, Beyond Empowerment is the rank system. It can be used to analyze hidden and unconscious influences of oppression on people's behavior. Resisting oppression requires that everyone - both those who benefit and those who are restricted by these social arrangements - become more aware in everyday interactions. This consciousness develops through a series of specific skills that can be identified and encouraged in oneself and in others.A unique feature of Nieto's approach is the practical nature of the skills model, which allows anyone to identify what skills they are using and expand their range. This framework is of special interest to educators, therapists, organizational leaders, activists, and anyone who wants to live in a more equitable society. The book provides exercises and tools to help people learn to see and name specific skills in films, fiction, and their own lives. It also uncovers the ways that the rank system shapes our inner lives, influencing our relationships, feelings, and perceptions. This flexible model admits the ambiguities and challenges of real life.More down to earth than academic theory, the book includes personal stories from people of diverse backgrounds, as well as exercises, visualizations, and poetry. The book reflects insights from its roots in developmental psychology, theater, and liberatory pedagogy. The book developed through collaboration over the past decade among Garth Johnson, Liz Goodwin, Margot Boyer, and Laurel Collier Smith.

Mad at School: Rhetorics of Mental Disability and Academic Life


Margaret Price - 2010
    We do not know how to abandon the myth of the 'pure (ivory) tower that props up and is propped up by ableist ideology.' . . . Mad at School is thoroughly researched and pathbreaking. . . . The author's presentation of her own experience with mental illness is woven throughout the text with candor and eloquence."---Linda Ware, State University of New York at GeneseoMad at School explores the contested boundaries between disability, illness, and mental illness in the setting of U.S. higher education. Much of the research and teaching within disability studies assumes a disabled body but a rational and energetic (an "agile") mind. In Mad at School, scholar and disabilities activist Margaret Price asks: How might our education practices change if we understood disability to incorporate the disabled mind?Mental disability (more often called "mental illness") is a topic of fast-growing interest in all spheres of American culture, including popular, governmental, aesthetic, and academic. Mad at School is a close study of the ways that mental disabilities impact academic culture. Investigating spaces including classrooms, faculty meeting rooms, and job searches, Price challenges her readers to reconsider long-held values of academic life, including productivity, participation, security, and independence. Ultimately, she argues that academic discourse both produces and is produced by a tacitly privileged "able mind," and that U.S. higher education would benefit from practices that create a more accessible academic world.Mad at School is the first book to use a disability-studies perspective to focus on the ways that mental disabilities impact academic culture at institutions of higher education. Individual chapters examine the language used to denote mental disability; the role of "participation" and "presence" in student learning; the role of "collegiality" in faculty work; the controversy over "security" and free speech that has arisen in the wake of recent school shootings; and the marginalized status of independent scholars with mental disabilities. Margaret Price is Associate Professor of English at Spelman College.

Med Head: My Knock-down, Drag-out, Drugged-up Battle with My Brain


James Patterson - 2010
    Now this deeply personal account of Cory Friedman's intense struggles with Tourette's Syndrome and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder--as well as depression, anxiety, and alcohol addiction--is available for teen readers.

Finding God in Hidden Places


Joni Eareckson Tada - 2010
    Readers will recall quiet, out-of-the-way moments in their own lives when God was present—both in happy and sad times. Words of encouragement, comfort, and insight leave the soul satisfied and longing to be closer to a loving Father, who often shows up when least expected.Finding God in Hidden Places is the perfect size for bedtime reading or taking along for daytime moments of rest and reflection.

Neuroethics: An Introduction with Readings


Martha J. Farah - 2010
    The ethical issues that arise from these developments extend beyond the boundaries of conventional bioethics into philosophy of mind, psychology, theology, public policy, and the law. This broader set of concerns is the subject matter of neuroethics. In this book, leading neuroscientist Martha Farah introduces the reader to the key issues of neuroethics, placing them in scientific and cultural context and presenting a carefully chosen set of essays, articles, and excerpts from longer works that explore specific problems in neuroethics from the perspectives of a diverse set of authors. Included are writings by such leading scientists, philosophers, and legal scholars as Carl Elliot, Joshua Greene, Steven Hyman, Peter Kramer, and Elizabeth Phelps. Topics include the ethical dilemmas of cognitive enhancement; issues of personality, memory and identity; the ability of brain imaging to both persuade and reveal; the legal implications of neuroscience; and the many ways in which neuroscience challenges our conception of what it means to be a person.Neuroethics is an essential guide to the most intellectually challenging and socially significant issues at the interface of neuroscience and society. Farah's clear writing and well-chosen readings will be appreciated by scientist and humanist alike, and the inclusion of questions for discussion in each section makes the book suitable for classroom use.ContributorsZenab Amin, Ofek Bar-Ilan, Richard G. Boire, Philip Campbell, Turhan Canli, Jonathan Cohen, Robert Cook-Degan, Lawrence H. Diller, Carl Elliott, Martha J. Farah, Rod Flower, Kenneth R. Foster, Howard Gardner, Michael Gazzaniga, Jeremy R. Gray, Henry Greely, Joshua Greene, John Harris, Andrea S. Heberlein, Steven E. Hyman, Judy Iles, Eric Kandel, Ronald C. Kessler, Patricia King, Adam J. Kolber, Peter D. Kramer, Daniel D. Langleben, Steven Laureys, Stephen J. Morse, Nancey Murphy, Eric Parens, Sidney Perkowitz, Elizabeth A. Phelps, President's Council on Bioethics, Eric Racine, Barbara Sahakian, Laura A. Thomas, Paul M. Thompson, Stacey A. Tovino, Paul Root Wolpe

Spreadeagle: A Novel


Kevin Killian - 2010
    His forty-year-old boyfriend, health care activist Kit Kramer, had once been romantically involved with another kind of writer entirely, the handsome experimentalist Sam D’Allesandro, now clinging onto the last shreds of life after several decades fighting off AIDS. The young, unstable art student Eric Avery, a fan of D’Allesandro’s, finagles a room in the vast California Street brownstone Isham and Kramer share. On the fringes of the story lurk two shady brothers—Gary Radley, a grifter who lives by selling fake anti-AIDS drugs to deluded New Age San Franciscans, and Adam Radley, a perfectionist porn director specializing in gay spanking videos. When D’Allesandro, who has lost his savings to Radley, threatens to expose the racket, things turn violent.Kevin Killian is a poet, novelist, critic, and playwright who most recently co-edited My Vocabulary Did This to Me: The Collected Poetry of Jack Spicer. He lives in San Francisco.

The Pirate of Kindergarten


George Ella Lyon - 2010
    But double vision is NOT a good kind of double. In fact, it can make kindergarten kind of hard. Ginny sees double chairs at reading circle and double words in her books. She knows that only half of what she sees is real, but which half? The solution to her problem is wondrously simple: an eye patch! Ginny becomes the pirate of kindergarten.With the help of her pirate patch, Ginny can read, run, and even snip her scissors with double the speed! Vibrant illustrations from Lynne Avril capture the realities of what Ginny sees both before and after.

Signature Wound: Rocking TBI


G.B. Trudeau - 2010
    D. to the bedside of SFC Leo Deluca (a.k.a. Toggle), a young HUMV driver and headbanger whose love of ear-bleed battle music had sonically distracted him enough to get his vehicle blown up. Missing an eye and suffering from aphasia, Toggle fights to recover from traumatic brain injury (TBI), a journey of recovery that brings out the best in B. D., his former commander. Toggle's tattooed, metalhead mom initially has reservations about his improbable Facebook romance with an MIT tech-head named Alex, but love blooms. As this engaging story unfolds, Toggle finds himself drawn toward a career in the recording industry, undaunted by the limitations of the New Normal that now defines his life.Crafted with the same kind of insight, humor, and respect that prompted the Pentagon and the VA to host signings of the two previous books in the trilogy, Signature Wound is a perceptive and timely look at the contemporary soldier's experience.

The World I Live In and Optimism: A Collection of Essays


Helen Keller - 2010
    Helen Keller relates her impressions of life's beauty and promise, perceived through the sensations of touch, smell, and vibration, together with the workings of a powerful imagination. The World I Live In comprises fifteen essays and a poem, "A Chant of Darkness," all of which originally appeared in The Century Magazine. These brief articles include "The Seeing Hand," "The Hands of Others," "The Power of Touch," "The Finer Vibrations," "Smell, the Fallen Angel" "Inward Visions," and other essays. "Optimism," written while Keller was a college student, offers eloquent observations on acquiring and maintaining a sense of happiness. These essays reflect the author's remarkable achievements, as expressed in her honorary degree from Harvard, the first ever granted to a woman: "From a still, dark world she has brought us light and sound; our lives are richer for her faith and her example."

Now I See the Moon: A Mother, a Son, a Miracle


Elaine Hall - 2010
    In the process, she founded The Miracle Project, a groundbreaking organization that uses the performing arts to connect with children with autism. Both controversial and unorthodox, Hall's innovative approach has been praised by leaders in the field of autism, including Temple Grandin, Barry Prizant, and Dr. Stanley Greenspan. She was also the subject of the Emmy Award-winning documentary Autism: The Musical. Hall now speaks around the country sharing her wisdom. Now I See the Moon is a story of hope, faith, and miracles; it is a story only a mother could tell.

Bodyguards in Love Volume 1


Carol Lynne - 2010
    With the men of Three Partners Protection Agency as role models, how can he go wrong? And falling in love with bodyguard Jackson Benoit, is a dream come true, but the dream becomes a nightmare when Jackie is gravely injured in the line of duty. Feeling helpless, Brier makes a promise to God in exchange for his lover's life. One he intends to keep no matter what.Jackie Benoit cherishes the love he's found with Brier. When his new lover insists on testifying against a violent man from his past in order to fulfill a promise, Jackie has no choice but try to stop him. If that doesn't work, Jackie will protect Brier with everything at his disposal.Seb's SurrenderAfter a lifetime of abuse, Jared Grant was rescued by Brier Blackstone and taken to one of the safest places he knew, the bodyguard dormitory of the Three Partners Protection Agency. For the first time, Jared is surrounded by men whose job it is to protect, not hurt him.One of his protectors, Sebastian James, knows a little something about abuse. Once a victim of abuse before he and his brother were taken from an abusive household and put into separate foster homes, Seb learned to harden his heart as a way of survival. Now, the soft spoken and scared Jared threatens the shell Seb spent years fortifying. When Jared’s tormentor threatens him from jail, it’s up to Seb and the rest of the bodyguards to keep Jared safe until he can testify at his abuser’s trial. However, the close contact might be more than Seb’s hard shell can withstand.

The City of Lovely Brothers


Anel Viz - 2010
    As the story evolves, it focuses on the love affair between the youngest brother, Caliban, who is lame, and Nick, one of their ranch hands, and how their relationship set the stage for the already open feud to explode and ultimately caused the demise of the ranch.

Filling the Void: Interviews About Quitting Drinking + Using


Cindy Gretchen Ovenrack Crabb - 2010
    Includes positive and negative roles drinking played in their lives, what brought them to the decision to quit, what worked and didn't, etc. The stories are really varied and inspiring. Interviewees include: Erick Lyle, Cindy and Caty Crabb, Artmoose, and John Geek.

Nerves


frenchmartini - 2010
    Meet Ryan – skate-punk extraordinaire with a penchant for chucking himself off vert ramps. In his wheelchair. Oh Lordy, that's got to hurt.Status: In progress/IncompleteLast update: 4/12/2010Word count: approx. 94,358

Disability Aesthetics


Tobin Anthony Siebers - 2010
    Along the way, Tobin Siebers revisits the beautiful and the sublime, 'degenerate' art and 'disqualified' bodies, culture wars and condemned neighborhoods, the art of Marc Quinn and the fiction of Junot Díaz---and much, much more. Disability Aesthetics is a stunning achievement, a must-read for anyone interested in how to understand the world we half create and half perceive."---Michael Bérubé, Paterno Family Professor in Literature, Pennsylvania State University"Rich with examples of the disabled body in both historical and modern art, Tobin Siebers's new book explores how disability problematizes commonly accepted ideas about aesthetics and beauty. For Siebers, disability is not a pejorative condition as much as it is a form of embodied difference. He is as comfortable discussing the Venus de Milo as he is discussing Andy Warhol. Disability Aesthetics is a prescient and much-needed contribution to visual & critical studies."---Joseph Grigely, Professor of Visual and Critical Studies, The School of the Art Institute of ChicagoDisability Aesthetics is the first attempt to theorize the representation of disability in modern art and visual culture. It claims that the modern in art is perceived as disability, and that disability is evolving into an aesthetic value in itself. It argues that the essential arguments at the heart of the American culture wars in the late twentieth century involved the rejection of disability both by targeting certain artworks as "sick" and by characterizing these artworks as representative of a sick culture. The book also tracks the seminal role of National Socialism in perceiving the powerful connection between modern art and disability. It probes a variety of central aesthetic questions, producing a new understanding of art vandalism, an argument about the centrality of wounded bodies to global communication, and a systematic reading of the use put to aesthetics to justify the oppression of disabled people. In this richly illustrated and accessibly written book, Tobin Siebers masterfully demonstrates the crucial roles that the disabled mind and disabled body have played in the evolution of modern aesthetics, unveiling disability as a unique resource discovered by modern art and then embraced by it as a defining concept. Tobin Siebers is V. L. Parrington Collegiate Professor of English Language and Literature and Art and Design at the University of Michigan. His many books include Disability Theory and The Subject and Other Subjects: On Ethical, Aesthetic, and Political Identity.A volume in the series Corporealities: Discourses of Disability

Rape in Holding Cell 6 - Part 2


Kyle Michel Sullivan - 2010
    But what he didn't realize as he fought back was how anger and hate were beginning to take complete control of him...and were leading him closer and closer to madness.

Disability Studies: An Interdisciplinary Introduction


Dan Goodley - 2010
    The book discusses the global nature of disability studies and disability politics, introduces key debates in the field and represents the intersections of disability studies with feminism, queer, and postcolonial theory. The book has a clear and coherent format which matches the interdisciplinary framework of disability studies - including chapters on sociology, critical psychology, discourse analysis, psychoanalysis and education. Each chapter engages with important areas of analysis such as the individual, society, community, and education to explore the realities of oppression experienced by disabled people and to develop the possibilities for addressing it.

Destroying Sanctuary: The Crisis in Human Service Delivery Systems


Sandra L. Bloom - 2010
    The resulting organizational trauma both mirrors and magnifies the trauma-related problems their clients seek relief from. Just as the lives of people exposed to chronic trauma and abuse become organized around the traumatic experience, so too have our social service systems become organized around the recurrent stress of trying to do more under greater pressure: they become crisis-oriented, authoritarian, disempowered, and demoralized, often living in the present moment, haunted by the past, and unable to plan for the future. Complex interactions among traumatized clients, stressed staff, pressured organizations, and a social and economic climate that is often hostile to recovery efforts recreate the very experiences that have proven so toxic to clients in the first place. Healing is possible for these clients if they enter helping, protective environments, yet toxic stress has destroyed the sanctuary that our systems are designed to provide. This thoughtful, impassioned critique of business as usual begins to outline a vision for transforming our mental health and social service systems. Linking trauma theory to organizational function, Destroying Sanctuary provides a framework for creating truly trauma-informed services. The organizational change method that has become known as the Sanctuary Model lays the groundwork for establishing safe havens for individual and organizational recovery. The goals are practical: improve clinical outcomes, increase staff satisfaction and health, increase leadership competence, and develop a technology for creating and sustaining healthier systems. Only in this way can our mental health and social service systems become empowered to make a more effective contribution to the overall health of the nation. Destroying Sanctuary is a stirring call for reform and recovery, required reading for anyone concerned with removing the formidable barriers to mental health and social services, from clinicians and administrators to consumer advocates.

Rape in Holding Cell 6 - Part 1


Kyle Michel Sullivan - 2010
    There is a new edition that combines both parts one and two that came out in March 2014. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2... ***

Cognitive Disability and Its Challenge to Moral Philosophy


Eva Feder Kittay - 2010
    Through a series of essays contributed by clinicians, medical historians, and prominent moral philosophers, Cognitive Disability and Its Challenge to Moral Philosophy addresses the ethical, bio-ethical, epistemological, historical, and meta-philosophical questions raised by cognitive disabilityFeatures essays by a prominent clinicians and medical historians of cognitive disability, and prominent contemporary philosophers such as Ian Hacking, Martha Nussbaum, and Peter Singer Represents the first collection that brings together philosophical discussions of Alzheimer's disease, intellectual/developmental disabilities, and autism under the rubric of cognitive disability Offers insights into categories like Alzheimer's, mental retardation, and autism, as well as issues such as care, personhood, justice, agency, and responsibility

Islands of Genius: The Bountiful Mind of the Autistic, Acquired, and Sudden Savant


Darold A. Treffert - 2010
    In this fascinating book, Dr. Darold Treffert looks at what we know about this remarkable condition, and at new discoveries that raise interesting questions about the hidden brain potential within us all.Dr. Treffert explores the phenomena of genetic memory - instances in which individuals somehow "know" things they never learned - and sudden genius or "acquired savantism" - where a neuro-typical person unexpectedly and spectacularly develops savant-like abilities following a head injury or stroke. Showing that these phenomena point convincingly towards a reservoir of untapped potential - an inner savant capacity - within us all, he looks both at how savant skills can be nurtured, and how they can help the person who has them, particularly if that person is on the autism spectrum. A central colour section contains the extraordinary artwork of some of the savants who are mentioned in the book.Islands of Genius will intrigue anyone who has ever wondered what makes the mind of a savant tick, as well as clinicians, parents, teachers, therapists, and others who care for, and about, individuals with savant syndrome.

Demons of the Body and Mind: Essays on Disability in Gothic Literature


Ruth Bienstock Anolik - 2010
    The sixteen critical essays in this collection examine the ways in which those suffering from mental and physical ailments are refigured as Other, and how they are imagined to be monstrous. Together, the essays highlight the Gothic inclination to represent all ailments as visibly monstrous, even those, such as mental illness, which were invisible. Paradoxically, the Other also becomes a pitiful figure, often evoking empathy. This exploration of illness and disability represents a strong addition to Gothic studies.

My Schizophrenic Life: The Road to Recovery from Mental Illness


Sandra Yuen MacKay - 2010
    As she says, "my life is schizophrenic because I have schizophrenia. It will always be there". Much of her life has been a struggle to cope with the symptoms of her disease and the side effects of the medications required to keep those symptoms in check. Early in her life, Sandra started to exhibit the typical symptoms of this disease which came as a surprise to her unsuspecting family. Her book chronicles her struggles, hospitalizations, encounters with professionals, return to school, eventual marriage, and success as an artist, writer and advocate. "Remarkably compelling...the book takes on a life if its own...a gripping narrative" Library Journal "There are precious few people who have experienced psychosis and can convey it accurately, clearly, and concisely. Sandra MacKay's story is an important one for all of us in the mental health field --doctors, patients, and their families. It is imperative that we take in the lessons she is imparting to us all, on how to manage, and in many ways, triumph, over chronic mental illness." Julie Holland, MD author, Weekends at Bellevue: Nine Years on the Night Shift at the Psych ER., New York city

Red Blooded


Deidre Knight - 2010
    His friend Mason Angel, a leader of the Shades, needs Dillon's help to take down a vampire clan. Once Dillon embarks on the mission, one woman stirs something inside him that he thought long dead. But as Dillon starts to fall for the sexy and charismatic female vampire, will he have to choose between love and duty?

My Friend Has Autism


Amanda Doering Tourville - 2010
    But that doesn't matter to us. We talk about airplanes, build models, and enjoy hanging out at each other's house. I'm glad Zack is my friend!