Best of
Folklore

2011

You Are My Sunshine


Jimmie Davis - 2011
    YOU ARE MY SUNSHINE has become well-known and well-loved by parents and children everywhere. Using the uplifting chorus, this board book with a foil cover is perfect for Valentine's Day, Mother's Day, Father's Day, or any day!

How to See Faeries


Brian Froud - 2011
    How does one discover faeries in one’s backyard or a garden, forest, or meadow? Through insets, hidden messages, magical signs, reflective mirrors, and other paper mechanics, Froud and Matthews reveal how anyone may discover the way to the land of Faerie. All you need is to believe and to own this book!

Treasury of Greek Mythology: Classic Stories of Gods, Goddesses, Heroes & Monsters


Donna Jo Napoli - 2011
    Brought to life with lyrical text by award-winning author Donna Jo Napoli and stunning artwork by award-winning illustrator Christina Balit, the tales of gods and goddesses such as Zeus, Aphrodite, Apollo, and Athena and heroes and monsters such as Helen of Troy, Perseus, and Medusa will fascinate and engage children’s imaginations.   National Geographic completes the book with embellishments of each story: sidebars for each god, goddess, hero, and monster link the myths to constellations, geography, history, and culture to help young readers connect the stories to real life events, people, and places. A family tree and a “cast of characters” profile page help make relationships between the characters clear, and a mapping feature adds to the fun and fascination. Resource notes and ample back matter directing readers to more information round out this luminous book. Sure to dazzle all those intrigued with the fantastic tales of Greek mythology and enchant new readers, this vibrant book will soon become a family keepsake.National Geographic supports K-12 educators with ELA Common Core Resources.Visit www.natgeoed.org/commoncore for more information.

Celtic Lore & Spellcraft of the Dark Goddess: Invoking the Morrigan


Stephanie Woodfield - 2011
    Discover the hidden lessons and spiritual mysteries of the Dark Goddess as you perform guided pathworkings, rituals, and spells. Draw on the unique energies of her many expressions—her three main aspects of Macha, Anu, and Badb; the legendary Morgan Le Fay; and her other powerful guises.From shapeshifting and faery magic to summoning a lover and creating an Ogham oracle, the dynamic and multifaceted Dark Goddess will bring empowering wisdom and enchantment to your life and spiritual practice.

Encyclopedia of Mystics, Saints Sages: A Guide to Asking for Protection, Wealth, Happiness, and Everything Else!


Judika Illes - 2011
    Illes,author of The Encyclopedia of 5000 Spells and The Encyclopedia ofSpirits, surpasses herself in this peerlessly expansive guide for allinterested in folklore, mythology, and history, as well as those looking forguidance about accessing the power of saints.  Illes’sThe Encyclopedia of Mystics, Saints, & Sages is the mostcomprehensive, accessible, and effective guide available anywhere.

A Branch from the Lightning Tree: Ecstatic Myth and the Grace of Wildness


Martin Shaw - 2011
    The four stories have at their center a man, woman, and adolescent.2. A narrative of why the author gave up a large musical publishing deal with Warner Brothers to spend four years living in a tent in the wilds and over a decade facilitating wilderness rites-of-passage for others.3.Shaw's eloquent insistence that without a renewed attention to myth and the initiation process we are only partially equipped to reestablish a complementary relationship with the living world.4.The core of these stories are paradoxical in nature, far from the clumsily perceived 'hero' myths, and point towards Trickster, or Coyote, as a way of existing in a world ambivalent to the insights of what you could call traditional knowledge.A BRANCH FROM THE LIGHTNING TREE is unique in the field of myth and ritual in several ways:1.It carries an 'in-the-field' narrative of several hundred men and women who have gone out into wild places to fast for four days and nights. Not in the Amazon, or in Mongolia, but in a place that is indigenous to them, that grounds the experience in the wider context of their lives, rather than a one-off event that can be hard to reconnect with. This is part of a growing mood to get to the bones of initiatory experience, rather than the cultural affectations. The stories illustrate both the grandeur and struggle of this often subtle process.2.Unlike many of the big mythological sellers (i.e Bly's IRON JOHN or Pinkola Estes WOMEN WHO RUN WITH WOLVES), A BRANCH FROM THE LIGHTNING TREE is not a gender piece, but focuses on both men and women's movement into wildness as part of the bigger awareness of climate change and ecology. It presents the old stories as keys into any debate on these issues, that the ability to think metaphorically/mythologically loosens the grip of literalness, and can 're-enchant' our perspectives.3. As a wilderness teacher Shaw has noticed that the real point of crisis that is emerging is the return to community, rather than the time out in the wild. This is turning of rites-of-passage on its head: Shaw reasons that the rites-of-passage process requires three stages following an initial Call to the Soul:(i) Going out of the Village, and the severance from ordinary life and the stepping into the image-laden language of myth, story, ritual;(ii) Into the Forest, baring the soul to extraordinary forces, receiving the sacred wound, bonding with the living world;(iii) And Back Again, return to community, the performance of identity, and the confirmation in and of the Soul.A BRANCH FROM THE LIGHTNING TREE invokes Robert Graves work on the White Goddess, and the Crow poems of Ted Hughes-it is a combination of practical knowledge, imaginative insight and passionate storytelling that gives Shaw's book its persuasiveness and power. At times incantatory, at times novelistic and poetic, he writes as someone who has been to these places, undergone these trials and tested himself at the extremes of lived experience.

The Celtic Twilight: Faerie and Folklore


W.B. Yeats - 2011
    Yeats took a particular interest in the tales' mythic and magical roots. The Celtic Twilight ventures into the eerie and puckish world of fairies, ghosts, and spirits. "This handful of dreams," as the author referred to it, first appeared in 1893, and its title refers to the pre-dawn hours, when the Druids performed their rituals. It consists of stories recounted to the poet by his friends, neighbors, and acquaintances. Yeats' faithful transcription of their narratives includes his own visionary experiences, appended to the storytellers' words as a form of commentary.

Llewellyn's Complete Formulary of Magical Oils: Over 1200 Recipes, Potions & Tinctures for Everyday Use


Celeste Rayne Heldstab - 2011
    Whether your intention is magical or medicinal, specially blended essential oils can enrich your life with their mystical, energizing, and transformative power.Within this one-of-a-kind portable apothecary, learn to select and mix 67 essential oils for a myriad of magical, medicinal, and spiritual applications. Spanning every purpose from inner calm and romance to healing and energy work to prayer and spellcraft, all 1,200 recipes are arranged alphabetically to make it easy to find precisely what you need.Step by step, Celeste Rayne Heldstab also shows how to create your own blends for spells, rituals, and remedies. Amp up their potency with correspondences for the elements, day of the week, time of day, Moon phase, astrological sign, herbs, and gemstones.Protection for house & home Love & passion Career & finances Dreamwork & meditation Beauty & skin care Fatigue, headaches, & other common ailments Praise: "Celeste skillfully demystifies the process of using and blending oils by providing lucid, detailed, and easy-to-read instructions while emphasizing the magical power inherent in plants."--Judika Illes, author of The Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells

The Last Storytellers: Tales from the Heart of Morocco


Richard L. Hamilton - 2011
    For nearly a thousand years, storytellers have gathered in Jemaa el Fna, the legendary square of the city, to recount ancient folktales and fables to rapt audiences. But this unique chain of oral tradition that has passed seamlessly from generation to generation is teetering on the brink of extinction. The competing distractions of television, movies, and the Internet have drawn the crowds away from the storytellers and few have the desire to learn the stories and continue their legacy. Richard Hamilton has witnessed first-hand the death throes of this rich and captivating tradition and, in the labyrinth of the Marrakech medina, has tracked down the last few remaining storytellers, recording stories that are replete with the mysteries and beauty of the Maghreb.

Breverton's Phantasmagoria: A Compendium of Monsters, Myths and Legends


Terry Breverton - 2011
    A superbly illustrated guide to the mysteries of myth, legend, and—gulp!—real life.

Llewellyn's 2012 Witches' Datebook


Llewellyn Publications - 2011
    Llewellyn's Witches' Datebook puts a wealth of witchy information at your fingertips so you can enhance your skills in fun yet meaningful ways. Cast a simple spell for peace, prepare a delicious batch of Brigid's Blessing Salad or Between-the-Worlds Blackberry Crumble, and keep track of meetings or movie dates.—Moon lore and Esbat rituals, plus Moon phases for successful      spellcasting—Daily planetary and color correspondences to empower your        magical work—Wiccan holidays, Sabbat musings, and tasty seasonal recipes for celebrating the Wheel of the Year—At-a-glance guide to the best days to plant and harvest—Seasonal spells and magical workingsAs always, your favorite authors share their Craft wisdom on a variety of helpful topics. You'll learn the art of "timecrafting"-how to stretch, contract, or bend time to suit your needs; discover how to add spark to any spell with candle magic essentials; find out how to empower your magic with the potent energy of the Dark Moon; and more!13th Year of Publication! Featuring beautiful original artwork by Jennifer Hewitson

Collected Folk Tales


Alan Garner - 2011
    Essential reading for young and old alike.Among the stories collected here are:• Kate Crackernuts• Gold-Tree and Silver-Tree• Yallery Brown

Sweet Dreams Are Made of Teeth


Richard Roberts - 2011
    All he knows is hunting your dreams and dragging them into the Dark.He’s not ready for his life to get complicated. He’s not ready to be dragged into his best friend’s schemes to make dreams so terrifying they break people. He’s not ready to love, or to be loved, or to meet someone who makes him happy.He’s definitely not ready for those to be three different girls.He’s not ready to grow up.When he does, one thing will stay the same. He’ll stay an artist, and he’ll paint your dreams with fear until they’re beautiful.

Scottish Herbs and Fairy Lore


Ellen Evert Hopman - 2011
    This is a valuable resource book not only for the serious folklorist, but also for a wider audience interested in a deeper look at rural Scottish practices. Ms. Hopman has done an amazing amount of research, and her Scottish herbalism section is far more detailed than I've seen elsewhere. A "must have" for the northern European folklorist's library. Jane T. Sibley, Ph.D., author of "The Hammer of the Smith" and "The Divine Thunderbolt: Missile of the Gods." Through her books, Ellen Evert Hopman lifts the veil between worlds of the present and the past. She guides the reader on a fascinating journey to our ancient Celtic history, simultaneously restoring lost knowledge and entertaining the reader. Be prepared to be educated and delighted. Wendy Farley, Clan McKleod The first things is WOW! Ellen Hopman has given us a volume that belongs in Harry Potter's library. This wonderful collection of enchantments, faery lore and herbal potions, is presented by a practicing herbalist and (I suspect) magician. It is a useful manual of magic, an unusual tourist guide to Scotland, certainly a delightful read, and at the very least, a comprehensive and thoroughly footnoted collection of folk lore for humorless librarians and scholars. Matthew Wood MS (Scottish School of Herbal Medicine) Registered Herbalist (American Herbalists Guild) Every now and again, a book emerges from the waves of occult and magical authorship that delves into the deep and ancestral waters of old magic! This book is one of those rare occasions. From the lore of herbs to the blessing of stones; from avioding the elf-blast to healing through Faerie blessing - Ellen guides the reader through ancient groves of oral lore to discover a power and spirit that connects the reader to the oldest of magics, the earth and her elements. I am confident that the Scottish Ancestral Wise Ones, are renewed through this book and the old ways live once again! Orion Foxwood, Traditional Witch Elder, Conjurer in Southern Root-Doctoring and Faery Seer (www.orionfoxwood.com), author of "The Faery Teachings" (R.J. Stewart Books) and "The Tree of Enchantment" (Weiser Books).

An Edmund Dulac Treasury: 116 Color Illustrations


Edmund Dulac - 2011
    Edmund Dulac, a prominent artist of the period, created them for books published between 1905 and 1928. Their moods range from the shadowy foreboding of Jane Eyre to the venturesome spirits of Treasure Island and the lighthearted fantasies of A Fairy Garland. Other featured titles include Shakespeare's The Tempest, The Arabian Nights, The Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyam, and the fairy tales of Hans Christian Andersen.French-born Edmund Dulac arrived in London in 1904, when new advances in the printing process kindled a rage for picture books. Dulac's imaginative powers and technical skills assured the popularity of his book illustrations, many of which were sold separately as fine art paintings. After World War I, when the appetite for deluxe volumes waned, the artist turned his talents in many new directions, including portraiture, theatrical costume and set design, newspaper caricature, and stamp design. This retrospective of his early works is the only such anthology available, offering a singular tribute to an artist from a halcyon era of art inspired by literature.

Tales from India


Jamila Gavin - 2011
    This new collection of Hindu tales, including the birth of the gods, tales of creation, and the arrival of humans, is illuminated by Amanda Hall's exquisite artwork, which reflects the influence of both classical and contemporary Indian art.

Vulture


Thom van Dooren - 2011
    But, as Thom van Dooren shows in this cultural and natural history, that dominant association leaves us with a very one-dimensional understanding of a group of actually rather fascinating and diverse creatures.Vulture offers an enlightening new history of this much-misunderstood bird. Vultures vary in type and size, and while some have a diet mainly of bone, others are actually almost completely vegetarian. Most interesting, despite its notorious  association  with death, the vulture very rarely, if ever, kills for itself. In different cultural mythologies, vultures play a role in disposing of the dead and officiating over human sacrifices, but they have often been viewed as courageous and noble creatures as well—believed to be indispensable in the containment of waste and disease and even to be world creators and divine mothers. Van Dooren explores these many histories, from some of the earliest-known Neolithic sites in which vultures are thought to have consumed the dead to contemporary efforts to reintroduce the bearded vulture into the Alps.Highlighting the rich diversity of vultures and the many ways in which people have understood and lived with them, Vulture invites a new appreciation and wonder for these incredible birds.

I Am Tama, Lucky Cat


Wendy Henrichs - 2011
    Little does he know that the hungry, shivering animal he names Tama would bring him both friendship and good fortune beyond his dreams. Illustrations.

Stranger Magic: Charmed States & The Arabian Nights


Marina Warner - 2011
    Magic is not simply a matter of the occult arts, but a whole way of thinking, of dreaming the impossible. As such it has tremendous force in opening the mind to new realms of achievement: imagination precedes the fact. It used to be associated with wisdom, understanding the powers of nature, and with technical ingenuity that could let men do things they had never dreamed of before. The supreme fiction of this magical thinking is The Arabian Nights, with its flying carpets, hidden treasure and sudden revelations. Translated into French and English in the early days of the Enlightenment, this became a best-seller among intellectuals, when it was still thought of in the Arab world as a mere collection of folk tales. For thinkers of the West the book's strangeness opened visions of transformation: dreams of flight, speaking objects, virtual money, and the power of the word to bring about change. Its tales create a poetic image of the impossible, a parable of secret knowledge and power. Above all they have the fascination of the strange -- the belief that true knowledge lies elsewhere, in a mysterious realm of wonder.As part of her exploration into the prophetic enchantments of the Nights, Marina Warner retells some of the most wonderful and lesser known stories. She explores the figure of the dark magician or magus, from Solomon to the wicked uncle in Aladdin; the complex vitality of the jinn, or genies; animal metamorphoses and flying carpets. Her narrative reveals that magical thinking, as conveyed by these stories, governs many aspects of experience, even now. In this respect, the east and west have been in fruitful dialogue. Writers and artists in every medium have found themselves by adopting Oriental disguise.With startling originality and impeccable research, this ground-breaking book shows how magic, in the deepest sense, helped to create the modern world, and how profoundly it is still inscribed in the way we think today.

Moonshining as a Fine Art: The Foxfire Americana Library


Foxfire Students - 2011
    Originally published in 1972, “Moonshining as a Fine Art” takes you through the their time-honored methods of making (and occasionally hiding) safe, successful stills. It also includes a glossary of moonshining terms and recipes for home-brewed mountain drinks like apple beer and blackberry wine.

Children's Book of Mythical Beasts & Magical Monsters


Deborah Lock - 2011
    These fantastical tales educate and fascinate by creating amazing worlds and inhabiting them with wondrous feats of heroics and dastardly deeds of evil. Full color.

The Lord's Prayer


Rick Warren - 2011
    Watson’s use of vibrant color and detailed imagery beautifully captures the essence of Jesus’ words to his disciples, and Warren’s thoughtful words help make the King James Version of this prayer come alive for readers young and old.

Hummingbirds: Facts and Folklore from the Americas


Jeanette Larson - 2011
    Since they are only found in the Americas, the myths and legends about this tiny bird originated from the peoples of North and South America. These native cultures wrote stories to offer explanations for the behavior and physical characteristics of this graceful species: Why does the hummingbird drink nectar? What accounts for its amazing flying abilities? Why is the hummingbird attracted to the color red?Jeannette Larson and Adrienne Yorinks have compiled facts and folklore about these intriguing fliers that will answer these questions and many more. Readers will also get a glimpse into the different cultures that have been transfixed for centuries by this bird, as well as learn many interesting scientific facts discovered by modern-day ornithologists. Adrienne’s bold and unique mixed-media quilts illustrate the hummingbird in nature and the mystery of these birds in ancient folklore.Substantial back matter includes an index, a glossary of terms, suggested further reading and websites, a bibliography, sources, resources, and a list of hummingbird sanctuaries.

The Qalupalik (English)


Elisha Kilabuk - 2011
    But when one bright young orphan strays too close to the ice, he soon learns that while qalupaliit may be very scary, they are also easily tricked.

Mermaid and Other Water Spirit Tales from Around the World


Heidi Anne Heiner - 2011
    Our modern day perception of mermaids is primarily based upon the mermaids and merrows of northern Europe, especially Scandinavia, Scotland and Ireland, as well as the sirens of ancient Greece. However, water spirits of some type exist in almost every culture situated near bodies of water, be they oceans, lakes, rivers or even wells and springs. This collection gathers together examples of the earliest scholarship on mermaids and their folkloric relatives, including several articles about their history from ancient times to the nineteenth century when mermaids captured the public and literary imagination during the folklore renaissance of the 1800s. In addition to the articles, over 150 tales and ballads about mermaids and other water spirits from around the world are compiled into this one convenient anthology. The emphasis is on the European mermaid in her many guises, but stories from Africa, Asia, and the Americas are also included. Whether you are a mermaid enthusiast or a student of folklore, this anthology offers a diverse array of tales with a unifying theme that both entertains and educates, all gathered for the first time in one helpful collection.

The Coyote Under the Table/El coyote debajo de la mesa: Folk Tales Told in Spanish and English


Joe Hayes - 2011
    Like his signature collection The Day It Snowed Tortillas, this book is full of lively characters and laugh-out-loud stories. There's a trio of unsuitable suitors who court a clever young girl and end up being scared out of their wits one midnight in a haunted church. And a greedy man who learns his lesson on a day when he couldn't stop dancing. And a spotted cat who is actually a guardian angel in disguise."Once again Hayes intrigues and amuses with this charming compilation."—Booklist"These wise and witty tales continue to repay fresh encounters."—Kirkus ReviewsJoe Hayes is a nationally recognized author and storyteller. Joe lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and travels extensively throughout the United States, visiting schools and storytelling festivals.Antonio Castro L. was born in Zacatecas, Mexico. He has illustrated dozens of children's books including other Joe Hayes classics Pájaro Verde and The Day It Snowed Tortillas (Cinco Puntos Press), as wells as Barry, the Bravest Saint Bernard (Random House) and The Life of Louis Pasteur (Twenty-First Century Books). He lives in El Paso, Texas.

Mummers, Maypoles and Milkmaids: A Journey Through the English Ritual Year


Sara Hannant - 2011
    Award-winning photographer Sara Hannant has travelled the length and breadth of the country, capturing the seemingly bizarre regional rituals – costumed processions, symbolic dramatizations, traditional dances and fire ceremonies – that mark the changing seasons. Many of these customs claim an ancient origin, and are kept alive today by local communities. Hannant’s vibrant photographs reflect her keen eye for the unexpected, offering a captivating and surprising surprising study of English identity.

Hansel and Gretel: A Pop-Up Book


Louise Rowe - 2011
    Illustrated in shades of green with touches of other colors, and with stunning pop-ups, Louise Rowe's Hansel and Gretel is a book to cherish.

Believe Me, Goldilocks Rocks!: The Story of the Three Bears as Told by Baby Bear


Nancy Loewen - 2011
    This retelling of the classic story, told from Baby Bear's perspective, will convince you that Goldilocks and Baby Bear (whose real name is Sam) were actually besties! This fractured fairy tale provides a fresh perspective on a well-known tale.

Bluebeard Tales from Around the World


Heidi Anne Heiner - 2011
    It has often been retold and reinterpreted in modern times in novels, poetry, plays, movies and more. Once upon a time the character was better known and offered a larger cultural touchstone for the general population. Today he is best known only in literary circles. Consequently, the history of the tale as seen through its tales and other interpretations is fascinating. Offering over ninety tales and ballads, this collection compiles several variants of Bluebeard tales from around the world. Many of the tales are new translations, some appearing for the first time in English. Usually the stories are obviously related to each other and at other times the relationship is more tenuous. While tales from Europe dominate the collection, other parts of the world--including Africa, India, and North America--are well represented. Additionally, several plays and operas, as well as short fictions and poetry, all primarily from the nineteenth century, are offered here. The commercial value and diverse interpretations of this complex tale provide insight into our cultural past, present, and perhaps our future. Whether you are a student of folklore or an armchair enthusiast, this anthology offers a diverse array of tales with a unifying theme that both entertains and educates, all gathered for the first time in one helpful collection.

The Norns in Old Norse Mythology


Karen Bek-Pedersen - 2011
    Karen Bek-Pedersen provides a thorough understanding of the role played by norns and other beings like them in the relevant sources. Although they are well known, even to people who have only a superficial knowledge of Old Norse mythology, this is the first detailed discussion of the norns to be published amongst the literature dealing with Old Norse beliefs. Surprisingly little has been written specifically about the norns. Although often mentioned in scholarship treating Old Norse culture, the norns are all too often dealt with in overly superficial ways. The research presented in this book goes much deeper in order to properly understand the nature and role of the norns in the Old Norse world view. The conclusions reached by the author overturn a number of stereotypical conceptions that have long dominated our understanding of these beings. The book has a natural focus on Old Norse culture and is especially relevant to those interested in or studying Old Norse culture and tradition. However, comparative material from Celtic, Anglo-Saxon and Classical traditions is also employed and the book is therefore of interest also to those with a broader interest in European mythologies.

Cinderella: An Islamic Tale


Fawzia Gilani - 2011
    This humble version of the classic fairy tale is a gentle reminder that victory comes as much from a peaceful soul as a beautiful dress and a dramatic confrontation." - Luxury ReadingCinderella is one of the oldest, best-known, and most loved stories worldwide, with hundreds of cultural variants and re-tellings from ancient Egypt and China to the present day. In this version we follow the trials and tribulations of the sweet, gentle, and pious Zahra when her parents die and she is left at the mercy of an uncaring stepmother and stepsisters. This is a well-crafted Islamic version of the classic tale in which faith, goodness, and prayer are rewarded in the end. The charming, richly detailed illustrations of Shireen Adams, set in medieval Andalusia, help bring the text to life.

Joseph and the Sabbath Fish


Eric A. Kimmel - 2011
    Even as his fortunes decline, Josephs door remains open. But times change and Judah turns to his Joseph for help. A very special fish helps Joseph save the day.

The Legend of the Fog


Qaunaq Mikkigak - 2011
    When he comes across a giant who wants to take him home and cook him for dinner, the young man's quick thinking saves him from being devoured by the giant and his family, and in the process releases the first fog into the world. Written by Cape Dorest elder Qaunaq Mikkigak and Marilyn Baillie Picture Book Award-nominated author Joanne Schwartz, this action-packed picture book brings a centuries-old traditional tale to life for modern readers.

Pagan Goddesses in the Early Germanic World: Eostre, Hreda and the Cult of Matrons


Philip A. Shaw - 2011
    Such local religious manifestations are, it is suggested, more important to Germanic paganisms than is often supposed, and should caution us against assumptions of pan-Germanic traditional beliefs. Linguistic and onomastic evidence is not always well integrated into discussions of historical developments in the early Middle Ages, and this book provides both an introduction to the models and methods employed throughout, and a model for further research into the linguistic evidence for traditional beliefs among the Germanic-speaking communities of early medieval Europe.

Seidr: The Gate Is Open


Katie Gerrard - 2011
    In Seidr: The Gate is Open, Katie Gerrard has contributed a major work on the practices of seidr and trance prophecy, providing a practical manual full of dynamic group rituals and techniques based on known Seidr practices. Foremost amongst these techniques is the prophetic rite of the High Seat, where the Volva (seer) sends her consciousness to the underworld realm of Hel to gain answers to the questions posed to her. Combining more than a decade of research and experimentation, this book is characterised by both its scholarship and its accessibility. Katie Gerrard shares her own experiences on the path of the seer, and also draws inspiration from original sources in the old texts of the Sagas and the Eddas, as well as contemporary researchers and groups working with seidr in Scandinavia, Europe and America. Techniques for achieving trance, levels of trance possession, coming out of trance, the vardlokkurs (chants), necessary equipment, and the requirements for the roles of the different participants, are all discussed in a clear and concise manner, as is the relevance of contacting the ancestors, the dead and the appropriate gods, including the goddesses Freyja and Hel, and the Allfather god Odin. As befits such an inspirational book, the author provides both the relevant background information for the eleven rites contained within, together with explanations of their inclusion and purposes. The rites emanate practical effectiveness, a result of their regular use over many years for successful exploration of the mysteries of trance prophecy, the High Seat rite and Norse witchcraft. "This is a spiritual journey laid bare for an audience who are either already treading a similar path or are looking for guidance in order to follow a well trodden path to a similar end point." * * * * * Katie Gerrard is a writer, researcher, and workshop facilitator with a passion for the magic of Seidr and the Runes. She has been studying the different forms of norse magic and working with norse gods since discovering them in the 1990s. Katie is also the author of Odin's Gateways (about working with the runes) and the forthcoming The Gate is Open (about Seidr and Northern tradition magical techniques), both publised by Avalonia Books. An essay on the High Sear Rite written by Katie Gerrard appeared in the Avalonia anthology 'Priestesses, Pythonesses, Sibyls'. She also regularly hosts seidr and other seer and norse rites within the London (UK) area.

Race, Oppression and the Zombie: Essays on Cross-Cultural Appropriations of the Caribbean Tradition


Christopher M. Moreman - 2011
    Contributors from a broad range of disciplines here examine the zombie and its relationship to colonialism, orientalism, racism, globalism, capitalism and more--including potential signs that the zombie hordes may have finally achieved oversaturation. Instructors considering this book for use in a course may request an examination copy here.

Founding Gods, Inventing Nations: Conquest and Culture Myths from Antiquity to Islam


William McCants - 2011
    Investigating a vast range of primary sources, some of which are translated here for the first time, and focusing on the dynamic influence of the Greek, Roman, and Arab conquests of the Near East, William McCants looks at the ways the conquerors and those they conquered reshaped their myths of civilization's origins in response to the social and political consequences of empire. The Greek and Roman conquests brought with them a learned culture that competed with that of native elites. The conquering Arabs, in contrast, had no learned culture, which led to three hundred years of Muslim competition over the cultural orientation of Islam, a contest reflected in the culture myths of that time. What we know today as Islamic culture is the product of this contest, whose protagonists drew heavily on the lore of non-Arab and pagan antiquity. McCants argues that authors in all three periods did not write about civilization's origins solely out of pure antiquarian interest--they also sought to address the social and political tensions of the day. The strategies they employed and the postcolonial dilemmas they confronted provide invaluable context for understanding how authors today use myth and history to locate themselves in the confusing aftermath of empire.

Professor Atlas And The Summoning Dagger


Paul Maguire - 2011
    Cursing the conflict that brought this civilization to an untimely end, the old wizard bestows his last bit of magic on a spectacular dagger. He buries the dagger deep within the earth, praying that one day it will be found by somebody brave enough, and smart enough, to save the village from ruin. Centuries later, Tyler Gerard and his best friend Brandon Giles enter a contest, the prize for which is the opportunity to join legendary explorer Professor Fielding Atlas on his quest to ind the Summoning Dagger of Mercastus. Although both boys have the full and active imaginations that are typical of seventh graders, nothing will prepare them for the incredible adventure that lies ahead... PAUL MAGUIRE lives with his wife and two sons in New York City, a place he has called home since 1990. After working on the New York Stock Exchange for more than two decades, he decided to shift gears dramatically and pursue his lifelong dream of writing. Professor Atlas and the Summoning Dagger is Maguire's first effort in this new endeavor, and he hopes to continue telling the tales of Professor Atlas's adventures in many future installments. Maguire wishes to give thanks to his family for the many ways they have helped him during this effort. To Coleen, who offered a great deal of support and encouragement, and to Andy and Finn, who provided the ideas and the inspiration which truly brought Professor Atlas to life. Maguire also thanks his father, Jim, who taught him how to tell a story, and his mother, Diane, who taught him almost everything else.

The Inhumanoids


Barton Nunnelly - 2011
    Even though they sometimes appear as 'less than human' they are quite beyond the normal sense of the wordand possess a troubling array of supernatural powers to prove the point. Some are true 'bi-forms', curious anthropomorphic mixtures of human and animals, while others manifest themselves in guises that one might pass by on the street and never give a second glance. From the smallest fairy to the tallest giant and every form in between, these inhumanoid beings, in all their myriad forms, have been with us since the beginnings of recorded history and beyond. Every culture knows the inhumanoids quite well. Since the dawn of time man has encountered such creatures, which simply cannot be explained away using conventional zoological science. In fact, all that we 'know' of mainstream biology, zoology and anthropology scream in unison that creatures like 'The Spottsville Monster' cannot possibly exist at all. Yet people see these beings, and a host of others of the same bizarre ilk, much more frequently than many would suspect. In researching this book I was struck by the sheer number of alleged inhumanoid encounters reported to have taken place: thousandsupon thousands. As a consequence of the sheer magnitude of such data, this work merely attempts to scratch the surface of that very old, long list.

Living with Herds


Natasha Fijn - 2011
    In this book, Natasha Fijn examines the process of animal domestication in a study that blends biological and social anthropology, ethology, and ethnography. She examines the social behavior of humans and animals in a contemporary Mongolian herding society. After living with Mongolian herding families, Dr. Fijn has observed through firsthand experience both sides of the human-animal relationship. Examining their reciprocal social behavior and communication with one another, she demonstrates how herd animals influence Mongolian herders lives and how the animals themselves are active partners in the domestication process.

How to Read Prehistoric Monuments: Understanding Our Ancient Heritage


Alan Butler - 2011
    An A-Z section details all the site types in the British Isles, and each monument is identified by latitude and longitude, making it easy for history buffs to find them using maps and geo-location devices.

Fairies in Medieval Romance


James Wade - 2011
    James Wade provides a counter-reading to theories of the Celtic origins of medieval fairies and suggests ways in which these unusual figures can help us think about the internal logics of medieval romance.

Tales from the 7,000 Isles: Filipino Folk Stories


Dianne de Las Casas - 2011
    Designed to provide educators with material with which to enhance curriculum and lesson plans, the stories open a gateway to a rich and unique cultural mix.The tales presented here are divided into animal stories, how and why stories, tales of enchantment, trickster tales, and scary stories. In them readers can discern not only the native Filipino culture, but the influences of the many peoples who have moved through and settled in the islands, most notably Malay, Chinese, and Spanish, but also Arab, Indian, and American. A brief history of the country, its people, and their cultural traditions is included, as are crafts, children's games, recipes, and color photos. Notes about the stories, a bibliography, and a glossary complete the volume.

Archie Green: The Making of a Working-Class Hero


Sean Burns - 2011
    Devoted to understanding the diverse cultural customs of working people, Archie Green (1917–2009) tirelessly documented these traditions and educated the public about the place of workers' culture and music in American life. Doggedly lobbying Congress for support of the American Folklife Preservation Act of 1976, Green helped establish the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress, a significant collection of images, recordings, and written accounts that preserve the myriad cultural productions of Americans. Capturing the many dimensions of Green's remarkably influential life and work, Sean Burns draws on extensive interviews with Green and his many collaborators to examine the intersections of radicalism, folklore, labor history, and worker culture with Green's work. Burns closely analyzes Green's political genealogy and activist trajectory while illustrating how he worked to open up an independent political space on the American Left that was defined by an unwavering commitment to cultural pluralism.

My Treasury Of Nursery Rhymes (New And Classic Fairytale Treasuries)


Various - 2011
    Nursery rhymes are a precious part of childhood and this treasury features timeless, classic and modern rhymes to read aloud and share together.

Amber


Troy D. Smith - 2011
    He had certainly not expected to find an Elven maiden, imprisoned for centuries by an evil sorceror. Jod beheld the bones of the many champions who had sought to free the beautiful Elf from her amber prison -and they'd come there on purpose!“Well, Jod, old fellow.” he said softly to himself. “You've certainly got yourself into it now.”

The Inheritance


R.S. Ramdial - 2011
    He has spent the past twenty years following news of rural murders and journeying incessantly back and forth into danger in this never-ending hunt. Theo is recuperating at a relative's house in idyllic Derbyshire when he comes across young Audrey Masterson, who is pricking her finger with a pin and collecting her tears. These tears produce a rather freakish effect and Theo feels duty-bound to investigate. He soon connects Audrey to an eerie, abandoned church on a lonely hill and also possibly to the death of an old woman in town. Theo knows how to deal with monsters, but how is he supposed to handle the budding evil of a witch-child?

Jack and the Devil's Purse: Scottish Traveller Tales


Duncan Williamson - 2011
    These twenty tales, re-told by one of Scotland's master storytellers, are a fascinating insight into Traveller beliefs about evil, temptation and suffering in which the Devil exists not to punish, but to outwit you in a contest of intelligence and knowledge. This collection is an expanded edition of Duncan Williamson's best-selling May the Devil Walk Behind Ye!, originally published by Canongate.

Sharing Our World: Animals of the Native Northwest Coast


Ian Reid - 2011
    Our beliefs, based on our ancient traditions, guide us to live in balance with the wildlife that we share this land with." - T.J. Young, Kaigani, Haida"Respecting animals and their habitat as taught by our elders allows us to connect as a co-inhabitants of the forests, oceans, and our entire planet." - Paul Windsor, Haisla, HeiltsukPartial proceeds from this publication support aboriginal early childhood development

Stories and Ballads of the Far Past Translated from the Norse (Icelandic and Faroese) with Introductions and Notes


Nora Kershaw Chadwick - 2011
    You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.