Best of
Medieval

2011

Lord of the Shadows


Kathryn Le Veque - 2011
    Not one man, woman or child lived without fear. Magnifying this fear is the man they call The Lord of the Shadows - a terrifying figure who sits at the right hand of the King, manipulating the royal moves like a puppet master. The Lord of the Shadows has been known to tear men apart with his bare hands and can, with a snap of his fingers, alter the future of anyone he chooses. The nobility is terrified of him, and for good reason. That is - the nobility that know of his existance. Lady Sheridan St. James has been drawn into the political arena by her father - having no sons, he shares all with his eldest daughter, a stunningly beautiful and bright creature. Upon his death, Sheridan finds herself at the head of the mighty House of St. James, a major leader in the rebellion against the crown. During her first visit to London she becomes acquainted with a massive knight who has, in kindness, saved her sister's life. She has no idea Sir Sean de Lara is the man known as The Lord of the Shadows, but even when she is told of his horrible deeds she still cannot not believe it. Sheridan and Sean draw close despite the influence of the horrendous affairs of state sweeping London. All she knows is that he is handsome and kind, and although Sean is well aware of the lady's status, it makes no difference that she is, in perception, his enemy. To him, she is quickly becoming his reason for living - but out of necessity his responsibilities to the king become stronger than his love for Sheridan and he is forced to perform his duties or risk death to them both. Still, he swears to her that his days as the Shadow Lord are numbered even as rival factions cruelly separated them. It soon becomes a test of Sean and Sheridan's love to find each other again in a world which is determined to keep them apart.

Lespada


Kathryn Le Veque - 2011
    - Davyss de Winter is the champion for King Henry III, a powerful and arrogant man that descends from a long line of powerful knights. He is also a much-sought after man and has had more than his share of female admirers, including a besotted baron's daughter who bore him bastard twins. His mother and family matriarch, the Lady Katharine de Warrenne de Winter, loses patience with her son's behavior and betrothes him to a woman she hopes will tame his wild ways. She selects a young woman from a lesser noble family with no political ties or ambitions, a perfect match for her son's prideful personality. Enter the Lady Devereux d'Arcy Allington; a young woman of astounding beauty, she wants nothing to do with Davyss. When Davyss, in protest of the marriage, sends his sword Lespada to the marriage ceremony, Devereux is beyond offended. Livid, she battles tooth and nail, refusing to marry a sword by proxy, until Lady Katharine intervenes. Cornered, Devereux is forced to marry Lespada because her groom refuses to show up for the ceremony. When Davyss gives in to his curiosity and meets his wife for the first time, he is overwhelmed with her beauty. Roughly consummating the marriage, he has set the tone for what both Davyss and Devereux believe will be a loveless, hateful marriage. But when Davyss begins to realize what he's done, he swallows his considerable pride and is determined to get to know the woman he married, a woman of grace and compassion like nothing he has ever known before. Though trials and tribulations, Davyss and Devereux's bond only strengthens. When Davyss is involved in the Battle of Evesham against Simon de Montfort, Devereux faces her own life and death situation. Lespada is a love story for the ages

Oakleaf Bearers


John Flanagan - 2011
    This appealing and original work illustrates the great adventure of 15-year-old orphan boy Will of Castle Redmont who always wanted to be a knight but became a ranger. Translated by Park Jung Seo. Book 8 In Korean. Distributed by Tsai Fong Books, Inc.

Lady of the English


Elizabeth Chadwick - 2011
    Matilda, daughter of Henry I, is determined to win back her crown from Stephen, the usurper king. Adeliza, Henry's widowed queen and Matilda's stepmother, is now married to William D'Albini, a warrior of the opposition. Both women are strong and prepared to stand firm for what they know is right. But in a world where a man's word is law, how can Adeliza obey her husband while supporting Matilda, the rightful queen? And for Matilda pride comes before a fall ...What price for a crown? What does it cost to be 'Lady of the English'?

Brave Young Knight


Karen Kingsbury - 2011
    In a series of contests and competitions, the king recognizes the brave young knight as the winner, not because he was the fastest or strongest, and not because he was smarter or more cunning than the other knights. Rather, the brave young knight is the winner because he doesn’t follow the crowd, instead making decisions based on what is right and true and in accordance with his faith. The moral of the story is that the bravest young boys are those who exhibit the strongest character.

Warrior


Violette Dubrinsky - 2011
    Ives of Lytheria is no princess of fairytales. After the unexpected death of her father, Jaisyn takes control of the kingdom, expecting to be called upon to defend her claim to a throne previously held by men. What she does not expect is the arrival of Vulcan Mor’an, the High King of the Northlands and the one man she despises above all, who seems to believe he is now the rightful ruler of her kingdom. Even as he provides support for his claim, Jaisyn refuses to listen. She will meet Vulcan Mor’an on the battlefield before willingly handing her kingdom to a barbarian she blames for the death of a loved one!Born to a ruthless warlord of a father, Vulcan Mor’an is powerful, fierce and quite deadly. His prowess is legendary, and those who don’t fear the Northern Wolf, respect his skill on the battlefield and his reach beyond it. Vulcan prides himself on his strength, and with it, his lack of weakness. That is, until he encounters a spitfire princess intent on murdering him in his sleep. Jaisyn of Lytheria is unlike any lady Vulcan has encountered. In her golden body is a fierce adversary, a woman who does not cower in his presence like most but fights his every step with a stubbornness that both irritates and captivates him. This princess may become the one person capable of bringing him to his knees. Warrior is the tale of two feuding royals, their attraction despite their differences, and the consequences that come as a result of their union. With various obstacles threatening to tear them apart, Jaisyn St. Ives and Vulcan Mor’an struggle to keep their relationship afloat, and with it, their very lives.

The Bloodstone Saga: The Complete Collection


Courtney Cole - 2011
    She is reborn time and time again into tragic lives with tragic ends. Time and time again, she loses her soul mate. Until finally, she comes face to face with who she really is and the earth-shattering realization changes everything. Every Last KissFatedWith My Last BreathMy Tattered BondsIn these four books, one girl is confronted with lies, happiness, treachery, magic and myth. She learns how strong she really is and what sacrifices she is truly prepared to make for those that she loves. Heartbreaking, poignant and emotional, these books will tug at your heart-strings and leave you breathless for more.What would you do if you held fate in your hands?

A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic


Geir T. Zoëga - 2011
    Even after 11 centuries, the modern Icelandic language is closer to the speech patterns of the Middle Ages than any living European language. Brought to Iceland during the 9th century by the Vikings (who invaded Britain during that same period), the language also influenced the development of modern English. Thus, a knowledge of Icelandic language is highly relevant to the study of English and British history. This volume, reprinted from a rare edition, will be indispensable in the study of the prose and poetry of Old Icelandic literature, which is regarded by many scholars as unrivaled among the literatures of medieval Europe.

Unexpected Circumstances


Savage7289 - 2011
    When a knight from a neighboring kingdom wins his choice of bride, Sir Edward bypasses the princess and claims the handmaid instead. Isabella suddenly finds herself married to a man she does not know, and is tossed into the middle of political plots and scheming nobles. Her life is further turned upside down when she is unable to give her husband the one thing he must have.Rated M for themes and eventual citrus, of course.Banner by India Rose.

Retrieving Nicaea: The Development and Meaning of Trinitarian Doctrine


Khaled Anatolios - 2011
    According to Anatolios, the development of trinitarian doctrine involved a global interpretation of Christian faith as a whole. Consequently, the meaning of trinitarian doctrine is to be found in a reappropriation of the process of this development, such that the entirety of Christian existence is interpreted in a trinitarian manner. The book provides essential resources for this reappropriation by identifying the network of theological issues that comprise the "systematic scope" of Nicene theology, focusing especially on the trinitarian perspectives of three major theologians: Athanasius, Gregory of Nyssa, and Augustine. It includes a foreword by Brian E. Daley.

Queen By Right


Anne Easter Smith - 2011
    Queen by Right reveals how she came to step into her destiny, beginning with her marriage to Richard, duke of York, whom she meets when she is nine and he is thirteen. Raised together in her father's household, they become a true love match and together face personal tragedies, pivotal events of history, and deadly political intrigue. All of England knows that Richard has a clear claim to the throne, and when King Henry VI becomes unfit to rule, Cecily must put aside her hopes and fears and help her husband decide what is right for their family and their country. Queen by Right marks Anne Easter Smith's greatest achievement, a book that every fan of sweeping, exquisitely detailed historical fiction will devour.

Dance of the Dandelion


Dina L. Sleiman - 2011
    One filled with color and music, with adventure and passion... with more.Haunted by childhood memories, Dandelion determines to find a better existence than the life every peasant in the village contents themselves with. Even if her sweetheart William's predictions prove true, and her journey leads straight to heartache.From her sleepy hamlet to the intrigue of castle life, from the heart of London to the adventurous seas, Dandelion flees from the mistakes of her past, always seeking that something, that someone who will satisfy her longings.Will Dandelion ever find the rhythm to her life's dance... or did she leave her chance for true love at home in Arun village?

Edward III


W. Mark Ormrod - 2011
    Reigning for over fifty years, he achieved spectacular military triumphs and overcame grave threats to his authority, from parliamentary revolt to the Black Death. Revered by his subjects as a chivalric dynamo, he initiated the Hundred Years' War and gloriously led his men into battle against the Scots and the French.In this illuminating biography, W. Mark Ormrod takes a deeper look at Edward to reveal the man beneath the military muscle. What emerges is Edward's clear sense of his duty to rebuild the prestige of the Crown, and through military gains and shifting diplomacy, to secure a legacy for posterity. New details of the splendor of Edward's court, lavish national celebrations, and innovative use of imagery establish the king's instinctive understanding of the bond between ruler and people. With fresh emphasis on how Edward's rule was affected by his family relationships—including his roles as traumatized son, loving husband, and dutiful father—Ormrod gives a valuable new dimension to our understanding of this remarkable warrior king.

Warrior's Redemption


Melissa Mayhue - 2011
    Neither his Viking heritage nor his claim to descend from Norse gods can restore his confidence in his ability to protect his people. His sister is held captive, her life in jeopardy, and his Magically powerful half brother wants him dead. The last thing he needs is more responsibility, but that's exactly what he gets when his Faerie mother-in-law arrives seeking justice for her daughter in the form of an enticing woman from seven hundred years in the future.DANIELLE DEARMON has waited fifteen years to discover the life she is supposed to live. She just never dreamed she'd end up in the thirteenth century with a handsome Scot bent on saving everyone but himself.With the lives of those most dear to him hanging in the balance, Malcolm sets out to battle a powerful evil Magic, only to learn that the redemption he seeks exists only in the arms of the woman he loves.

Green Suns and Faërie: Essays on J.R.R. Tolkien


Verlyn Flieger - 2011
    R. R. Tolkien’s popularity has never been higher. In Green Suns and Faërie, author Verlyn Flieger, one of world’s foremost Tolkien scholars, presents a selection of her best articles―some never before published―on a range of Tolkien topics.The essays are divided into three distinct sections. The first explores Tolkien’s ideas of sub-creation–the making of a Secondary World and its relation to the real world, the second looks at Tolkien’s reconfiguration of the medieval story tradition, and the third places his work firmly within the context of the twentieth century and “modernist” literature. With discussions ranging from Tolkien’s concepts of the hero to the much-misunderstood nature of Bilbo’s last riddle in The Hobbit, Flieger reveals Tolkien as a man of both medieval learning and modern sensibility―one who is deeply engaged with the past and future, the regrets and hopes, the triumphs and tragedies, and above all the profound difficulties and dilemmas of his troubled century.Taken in their entirety, these essays track a major scholar’s deepening understanding of the work of the master of fantasy. Green Suns and Faërie is sure to become a cornerstone of Tolkien scholarship.

My Fierce Highlander


Vonda Sinclair - 2011
    She risks everything to rescue the fierce MacGrath warrior from the battlefield where he’s left for dead by her clan. She only knows she is inexplicably drawn to him and he wants peace as she does. When her clan learns of her betrayal, they seek vengeance. Dare she trust the enemy more than her own family?Laird Alasdair MacGrath is driven to end two-hundred years of feuding with the MacIrwins. But by taking in and protecting Lady Gwyneth and her son, he provokes more attacks from his mortal enemy. As the danger and conflict surrounding them escalate, Alasdair and Gwyneth discover an explosive passion neither of them expected. With the arrival of a powerful man from her past, a horrible decision confronts her--give up her son or the man she loves.

Strategos: Born in the Borderlands


Gordon Doherty - 2011
    Only one man can save the empire . . . the Haga!1046 AD. The Byzantine Empire teeters on full-blown war with the Seljuk Sultanate. In the borderlands of Eastern Anatolia, a land riven with bloodshed and doubt, young Apion's life is shattered in one swift and brutal Seljuk night raid. Only the benevolence of Mansur, a Seljuk farmer, offers him a second chance of happiness. Yet a hunger for revenge burns in Apion's soul, and he is drawn down a dark path that leads him right into the heart of a conflict that will echo through the ages.

Highland Legacy


B.J. Scott - 2011
    When Highland patriot Connor Fraser comes to her aid, his steadfast dedication to king and country is challenged by his overwhelming desire to protect Cailin—even if he must marry her to do so.Accused of murdering one of her attackers and determined to rely on her own resourcefulness, Cailin dresses as a lad, intent on seeking refuge at the camp of Robert the Bruce. Can she elude an enemy from her past—a vindictive English lord bent on her utter demise—or will she fall prey to his carnal intent and be executed for a crime she did not commit?

Winter Heart


Margaret Frazer - 2011
    Another has been murdered.In the bleakest depths of winter, Frevisse finds her soul chilled with the heavy burdens of duty and responsibility. Even the warmth of charity is in short supply as the villagers of Prior Byfield turn against each in bloody feuds of greed and rage, weaving knots of treachery which even the clever Frevisse may find hard to unwind.Award-winning author Margaret Frazer gathers shadows around the hearth to tell a tale of frigid winter and icy passion. Join Frevisse in her fervent prayers for a true peace of mind and body as she pits all her forceful will against the most cunning of evils. Fear for the lives which may be destroyed in unlocking the secrets of the winter heart...A story from Margaret Frazer's Tales.PRAISE FOR THE SISTER FREVISSE SERIES"This is a perfect mystery: It's flawless." - Drood Review of Mystery"Frazer's grasp of the society and tangled politics in England in the mid-1400s is masterful." - Firsts, the Book Collector's Magazine"Keeps readers turning the pages." - Marina Oliver, Historical Novels Review"Frazer's quiet yet intense medieval mysteries are so vividly and gracefully written you just float back in time..." - BookNews from The Poisoned Pen"Whether good or evil, her characters are vibrant and compelling. While we might like to believe that the prejudices of that era have passed into history, we are reminded that we are not so very different after all." - Lorraine Gelly, Romantic Times Book ClubA Romantic Times Top Pick.Twice nominated for the Minnesota Book Award.Twice nominated for the Edgar Award.

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, the Lady of Shallot, the Lady of the Fountain, and Other Classic Poems and Tales of Camelot


Alfred Tennyson - 2011
    The Arthurian tales of chivalry, romance, and tragedy have left a lasting impact on English literature. This collection contains Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (trans. 1898), The Lady of Shallot (1833), The Founding of the Round Table (trans. 1914), The Passing of Arthur (trans. 1914), The Morte D'arthur (1914), The Lady of the Fountain (trans. 1877), Arthurian Songs: 1. Avalon (1894), and Sir Galahad, a Christmas Mystery (1858).

Ye Castle Stinketh: Could You Survive Living in a Castle?


Chana Stiefel - 2011
    Have you ever dreamed of living in a castle? Did you imagine farm animals crowding the square, a moat filled with poop, and an army of invaders holding you under siege? Life in the Middle Ages was no fairy tale! Charge back in time to find out what real life was like in castles of the Middle Ages in this reluctant reader book.

Loving the Knight


Kris Tualla - 2011
    A bastard orphan, she has claimed the Bell estate in the aftermath of the Black Death. When Lord Andrew Drummond, courtier to King David II, arrives Eryn hides her treasonous deception from the knight, despite his passionate proposal. After Drew discovers her lies, will he convince the king to spare her life? And will either one move beyond their stubborn pride and painful pasts to salvage love ~ before it's too late?*****All would be fine if Lord Andrew Drummond hadn’t made an unexpected visit on behalf of King David II, held in the Tower of London as prisoner of England’s King Edward III. Drew, as the Scottish king’s main connection with the country he reigns over, has been traveling all over Scotland at the king’s behest. He is to assess the damage from the Black Death that has devastated the country; the country King David expects to raise the ransom to secure his freedom.The knight is impressed with the smooth running of Castleton, as well as its Lady. Eryn is tall, graceful, and confident. After months of viewing the horror caused by the Death, he is only too happy to pass some peaceful time at Castleton, before he returns to the king with his troubling report. Eryn knows that assuming a title that was not hers is a punishable offence, even to death. And Drew is certain this lovely lady is hiding something. But the pull between them is causing more problems. Her fear of being discovered, and his determination to uncover her secret, adds even more tension to their developing attraction. Loving the Knight kept me up nights. It was difficult to put the book down, many chores went undone. Kris Tualla has woven a tale of love and fear with splendid results. The anxiety and loneliness of Eryn came through so effectively, it tore at my heart. Her determination to keep Castleton afloat, even using treasonous methods at times, brought remarkable strength to this character. Drew’s feelings of protection and concern, and growing love for this enigmatic woman won me over whole heartedly. Well developed secondary characters rounded out the story nicely, making it a truly enjoyable read. Warning: Don’t start this book late at night!~ Callie Hutton, author of A Run For Love*****I thoroughly enjoyed losing myself in such stellar writing. I felt the cold in my bones, heard the brogue, held my breath at every plot twist. I feel privileged to have shared the lives of such admirably flawed characters who, in desperate times, risked it all in the name of love.~ Award-winning author Vijaya Schartz*****A knight on a mission for his king and a woman determined to save the estate of the future laird have had to stand alone and were content to do so, until they meet and catch a glimpse of what it might be to share the journey, if only bothersome things like their pasts, secrets, treason, survival, and pride weren't such obstacles.If you thought finding love in the 21st century was a challenge, trying finding it in 1354 Scotland, after the decimation of the Black Plague. I loved this book!~ Judy - An Avid Romance Reader

Folville's Law


David Pilling - 2011
    Along the way he meets a widow, Elizabeth Clinton, and makes an enemy of the ruthless outlaw Eustace Folville. Meanwhile, England is threatened by invasion and civil war, and it remains to be seen who will survive and who will perish in the brutal game of 14th century war and politics.

Lost Gold of the Dark Ages: War, Treasure, and the Mystery of the Saxons


Caroline Alexander - 2011
    The treasure trove promises to shed unprecedented light on the most mysterious period of British history—the so-called "Dark Ages"—when the Saxons, Anglos, Celts, Picts, Jutes, and Vikings battled for control of the British Isles and a "mish mash of peoples evolved into a homogenous nation possessed with a strong cultural identity," according to New York Times bestselling author of the book, Caroline Alexander.   Alexander, author of the bestselling The Endurance and The Bounty, draws themes from the story of the spectacular treasure to explore the entire fascinating history of the Saxons in England; from the fall of Rome to the flourishing and seemingly incomprehensible spread of Saxon influence. Piece by piece, she draws readers into a world of near constant warfare guided by a unique understanding of Christianity, blended as it was with pagan traditions. Through heroic and epic literature that survives in poems such as Beowulf and the Legends of King Arthur, Alexander seeks to separate myth from reality and wonder, with readers, if the circumstances of the deposit of such a spectacular hoard have parallels in legendary tales. Peering through a millennia of mist and mystery, Alexander reveals a fascinating era—and a mesmerizing discovery—as never before, uncovering a dynamic period of history that would see its conclusion in the birth of the English nation.   Set in a landscape whose beauty endures, the story of the making of England emerges through a wealth of archaeological and written material. The story highlights the fluid nature of human societies and carries a surprisingly modern message of a successful, cohesive culture emerging from a diverse group of peoples.From the Hardcover edition.

Great Christian Thinkers: From the Early Church Through the Middle Ages


Benedict XVI - 2011
    Here Pope Benedict XVI accessibly and sympathetically reflects on the lives and works of Christianitys chief theologians, teachers, ascetics and mystics up to the end of the Middle Ages.

Becoming the People of the Talmud: Oral Torah as Written Tradition in Medieval Jewish Cultures


Talya Fishman - 2011
    The book indubitably places Talya Fishman in the vanguard of scholarly research."--Israel J. Yuval, Hebrew University of Jerusalem In Becoming the People of the Talmud, Talya Fishman examines ways in which circumstances of transmission have shaped the cultural meaning of Jewish traditions. Although the Talmud's preeminence in Jewish study and its determining role in Jewish practice are generally taken for granted, Fishman contends that these roles were not solidified until the late eleventh and early twelfth centuries. The inscription of Talmud--which Sefardi Jews understand to have occurred quite early, and Ashkenazi Jews only later--precipitated these developments. The encounter with Oral Torah as a written corpus was transformative for both subcultures, and it shaped the roles that Talmud came to play in Jewish life. What were the historical circumstances that led to the inscription of Oral Torah in medieval Europe? How did this body of ancient rabbinic traditions, replete with legal controversies and nonlegal material, come to be construed as a reference work and prescriptive guide to Jewish life? Connecting insights from geonica, medieval Jewish and Christian history, and orality-textuality studies, Becoming the People of the Talmud reconstructs the process of cultural transformation that occurred once medieval Jews encountered the Babylonian Talmud as a written text. According to Fishman, the ascription of greater authority to written text was accompanied by changes in reading habits, compositional predilections, classroom practices, approaches to adjudication, assessments of the past, and social hierarchies. She contends that certain medieval Jews were aware of these changes: some noted that books had replaced teachers; others protested the elevation of Talmud-centered erudition and casuistic virtuosity into standards of religious excellence, at the expense of spiritual refinement. The book concludes with a consideration of Rhineland Pietism's emergence in this context and suggests that two contemporaneous phenomena--the prominence of custom in medieval Ashkenazi culture and the novel Christian attack on Talmud--were indirectly linked to the new eminence of this written text in Jewish life. Talya Fishman is Associate Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. She is the author of Shaking the Pillars of Exile: "Voice of a Fool," an Early Modern Jewish Critique of Rabbinic Culture. Jewish Culture and Contexts 2011 424 pages 6 x 9 2 illus. ISBN 978-0-8122-4313-0 Cloth $65.00s 42.50 World Rights Religion Short copy: Talya Fishman explores the roles the Babylonian Talmud played in the textualization of medieval European Jewish culture."

Medieval Cats


Kathleen Walker-Meikle - 2011
    They are depicted as pets, as mousers, in Bestiaries, in marginalia, and in other surprising images—for example, depictions of cats in religious iconography. This charming gift book presents a wealth of cat imagery from a wide variety of medieval sources and will have a wide appeal for cat lovers everywhere. The text is peppered with fascinating facts about the medieval view of cats and amusing anecdotes about people and their pets in the Middle Ages. For example, "Cats often had full rein of the dining hall, a situation which books of courtesy despaired of, asking that owners refrain from petting cats sitting on tables. They also invaded bedrooms, for which the Boke of Nurture asked with little success that the owner dryve out dogge and catte, or els geve them a clout."

The Historical Atlas of Knights & Castles: The Rise and Fall of the Age of Chivalry


Ian Barnes - 2011
    Knights have a unique military and romantic legacy, and this analyzes how knighthood has been portrayed in art and literature over the centuries. The book examines the distinct legacy of the knight, focusing on knighthood in its military and romantic modes and looking at the concept of chivalry as an ideal but seldom attained state. It also details the castle, explaining how and why they were built.  It looks at their construction and demonstrates how designs became more intricate over the centuries.  Castle life is examined in detail, focusing on the social fabric and hierarchy, work, entertainment, food production, and the castle town.  The role of religion and monasticism in castles is also explored.  Many of the major castles are visited and mapped, giving a real insight into the role they played in centuries gone by.

Tolkien and the Study of His Sources: Critical Essays


Jason Fisher - 2011
    For all candidates, party affiliation, number of votes received, and percentage of popular vote are given. A brief history of congressional elections is provided, outlining the variations between states in the early years and detailing the changes caused by the Civil War and the Reconstruction era.

Christian Materiality: An Essay on Religion in Late Medieval Europe


Caroline Walker Bynum - 2011
    Challenging Christians both to seek ever more frequent encounters with miraculous matter and to turn to an inward piety that rejected material objects of devotion, such phenomena were by the fifteenth century at the heart of religious practice and polemic. In Christian Materiality, Caroline Walker Bynum describes the miracles themselves, discusses the problems they presented for both church authorities and the ordinary faithful, and probes the basic scientific and religious assumptions about matter that lay behind them. She also analyzes the proliferation of religious art in the later Middle Ages and argues that it called attention to its materiality in sophisticated ways that explain both the animation of images and the hostility to them on the part of iconoclasts.Seeing the Christian culture of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries as a paradoxical affirmation of the glory and the threat of the natural world, Bynum's study suggests a new understanding of the background to the sixteenth-century reformations, both Protestant and Catholic. Moving beyond the cultural study of "the body"--a field she helped to establish--Bynum argues that Western attitudes toward body and person must be placed in the context of changing conceptions of matter itself. Her study has broad theoretical implications, suggesting a new approach to the study of material culture and religious practice.

There Your Heart Will Be Also


Felicia Rogers - 2011
    So when her father passes and the King begins sending suitors, she feels justified in taking matters into her own hands. Through a series of harmless pranks, Sarra works to keep the potential husbands at bay. Cedric MacNeil is a Scotsman that has lost it all. Death claimed his parents and jealousy claimed his entitled position as Laird of his clan. Since his mother was a familiar of the English court, he leaves his native land and heads to England to fight on behalf of the English King. Tournaments are won, earning honor and glory for the crown. Cedric’s reward is the opportunity to gain what he wants most in this life, land. But as he gets to know Sarra, he realizes he might get more than he bargained for.

Cuisine and Culture: A History of Food and People


Linda Civitello - 2011
    Now revised and updated, this Third Edition is more comprehensive and insightful than ever before. Covers prehistory through the present day—from the discovery of fire to the emergence of television cooking shows Explores how history, culture, politics, sociology, and religion have determined how and what people have eaten through the ages Includes a sampling of recipes and menus from different historical periods and cultures Features French and Italian pronunciation guides, a chronology of food books and cookbooks of historical importance, and an extensive bibliography Includes all-new content on technology, food marketing, celebrity chefs and cooking television shows, and Canadian cuisine. Complete with revealing historical photographs and illustrations, Cuisine and Culture is an essential introduction to food history for students, history buffs, and food lovers.

The History of Rome in Painting


Jacqueline Champeaux - 2011
    Now, in The History of Rome in Painting, that entire span is brought to life through the visions of the greatest painters of the past millennium.As two previous Abbeville volumes, The History of Paris in Painting and The History of Venice in Painting, did for their respective cities, Rome provides the most luxurious possible visual presentation of one of the world's most beautiful places. Editors Maria Teresa Caracciolo and Roselyne de Ayala, with the help of six other expert contributors, guide the reader through the colorful and tumultuous history of the Eternal City, from its humble origins as a village on the Palatine Hill to the cultural explosion of the Renaissance, from its reinvention as the capital of modern Italy to the watershed of the Lateran Treaty and beyond. Here you will find portraits of the city's most famous and controversial leaders--from Julius Caesar to Mussolini--as well as its long succession of popes and aristocratic families. Depicted also, in brilliant detail, are the city's architectural and sculptural landmarks: Saint Peter's Basilica, Trajan's Column, the Fontana di Trevi, and many more.With its more than three hundred full-color illustrations, including four spectacular gatefolds; its insightful text, written by leading art historians; and its valuable apparatus, including capsule biographies of 175 artists; The History of Rome in Painting is an important achievement in scholarship and publishing and a fitting tribute to the Eternal City. It is a true feast for art lovers, travelers, and historians alike. In art history as in the ancient Empire, "all roads lead to Rome"; here in one volume is the city as generations of painters have sought it, dreamed it, and captured it for all time. Like its predecessors The History of Venice in Painting and The History of Paris in Painting, it belongs in every art lover's library.

Old Norse Women's Poetry: The Voices of Female Skalds


Sandra Ballif Straubhaar - 2011
    This book presents a bilingual edition (Old Norse and English) with commentary and notes of this material, from the ninth to the thirteenth century and beyond. The poems reflect the dramatic and often violent nature of the sagas: they feature Viking Age shipboard adventures and shipwrecks; prophecies; curses; declarations of love and of revenge; duels, feuds and battles; encounters with ghosts; marital and family discord; and religious insults, among many other topics. Their authors fall into four main categories: pre-Christian Norwegian and Icelandic skaldkonur of the Viking Age; Icelandic skaldkonur of the Sturlung Age (thirteenth century); additional early skaldkonur from the Islendingasogur and related material, not as historically verifiable as the first group; and mythical figures cited as reciting verse in the legendary sagas (fornaldarsogur).

William Shakespeare: A Very Peculiar History


Jacqueline Morley - 2011
    We learn about Shakespeare's family and childhood, and, with much reference to his most famous works, why his writing has endured the test of time and remains endlessly adaptable.

How to Make a Human: Animals and Violence in the Middle Ages (Interventions: New Studies in Medieval Culture)


Karl Steel - 2011
    Karl Steel argues that the human subjugation of animals played an essential role in the medieval concept of the human. In their works and habits, humans tried to distinguish themselves from other animals by claiming that humans alone among worldly creatures possess language, reason, culture, and, above all, an immortal soul and resurrectable body. Humans convinced themselves of this difference by observing that animals routinely suffer degradation at the hands of humans. Since the categories of human and animal were both a retroactive and relative effect of domination, no human could forgo his human privileges without abandoning himself.Medieval arguments for both human particularity and the unique sanctity of human life have persisted into the modern age despite the insights of Darwin. How to Make a Human joins with other works in critical animal theory to unsettle human pretensions in the hopes of training humans to cease to project, and to defend, their human selves against other animals.

The English Castle: 1066-1650


John Goodall - 2011
    As homes or ruins, these historic buildings are today largely objects of curiosity. For centuries, however, they were at the heart of the kingdom's social and political life. The English Castle is a riveting architectural study that sets this legion of buildings in historical context, tracing their development from the Norman Conquest in 1066 through the civil wars of the 1640s.In this magnificent, compellingly written volume, which includes over 350 illustrations, John Goodall brings to life the history of the English castle over six centuries. In it he explores the varied architecture of these buildings and describes their changing role in warfare, politics, domestic living, and governance.

The Norns in Old Norse Mythology


Karen Bek-Pedersen - 2011
    Karen Bek-Pedersen provides a thorough understanding of the role played by norns and other beings like them in the relevant sources. Although they are well known, even to people who have only a superficial knowledge of Old Norse mythology, this is the first detailed discussion of the norns to be published amongst the literature dealing with Old Norse beliefs. Surprisingly little has been written specifically about the norns. Although often mentioned in scholarship treating Old Norse culture, the norns are all too often dealt with in overly superficial ways. The research presented in this book goes much deeper in order to properly understand the nature and role of the norns in the Old Norse world view. The conclusions reached by the author overturn a number of stereotypical conceptions that have long dominated our understanding of these beings. The book has a natural focus on Old Norse culture and is especially relevant to those interested in or studying Old Norse culture and tradition. However, comparative material from Celtic, Anglo-Saxon and Classical traditions is also employed and the book is therefore of interest also to those with a broader interest in European mythologies.

Anglo-Saxon Psychologies in the Vernacular and Latin Traditions


Leslie Lockett - 2011
    While readers usually assume the metaphorical nature of such literary images, Leslie Lockett, in Anglo-Saxon Psychologies in the Vernacular and Latin Traditions, argues that these depictions are literal representations of Anglo-Saxon folk psychology.Lockett analyses both well-studied and little-known texts, including Insular Latin grammars, The Ruin, the Old English Soliloquies, The Rhyming Poem, and the writings of Patrick, Bishop of Dublin. She demonstrates that the Platonist-Christian theory of the incorporeal mind was known to very few Anglo-Saxons throughout most of the period, while the concept of mind-in-the-heart remained widespread. Anglo-Saxon Psychologies in the Vernacular and Latin Traditions examines the interactions of rival - and incompatible - concepts of the mind in a highly original way.

The Oxford Handbook of Anglo-Saxon Archaeology


Helena Hamerow - 2011
    This evidence has confirmed some readings of the Anglo-Saxon literary and documentary sources and challenged others. More recently, large-scale excavations both in towns and in the countryside, the application of computer methods to large bodies of data, new techniques for site identification such as remote sensing, and new dating methods have put archaeology at the forefront of Anglo-Saxon studies. The Handbook of Anglo-Saxon Archaeology, written by a team of experts and presenting the results of the most up-to-date research, will both stimulate and support further investigation into those aspects of Anglo-Saxon life and culture which archaeology has fundamentally illuminated. It will prove an essential resourse for our understanding of a society poised at the interface between prehistory and history.

History of the Later Roman Empire: From the Death of Theodosius I to the Death of Justinian Volume 2


John Bagnell Bury - 2011
    One of the world's foremost historians chronicles the major forces and events in the history of the Western and Byzantine Empires from the death of Theodosius (A.D. 395) to the death of Justinian (A.D. 565). "An important and valuable contribution to our knowledge of a period the history of which has been too much neglected." — Classical Review.

The Stone-Worker's Tale


Margaret Frazer - 2011
    Charged with carving the angels upon Alice's tomb, Simon has been truly touched by God's gift - there was an otherworldiness to their stone features, an aliveness to the very feathers of their wings. He saw beauty that others could not, and brought it to life through his craft.But Simon also saw the beauty of Elyn, one of Alice's ladies in waiting. Clandestine meetings have given way to sinful lust, and now the two lovers have disappeared. The servants whisper that the lovers have eloped, and secretly pine for the passion to do the same. Lady Alice believes her sculptor has been stolen away by jealous rivals and rages at the injustice. But Frevisse alone suspects there may be some darker truth behind the midnight vanishing...A story from Margaret Frazer's Tales.PRAISE FOR THE SISTER FREVISSE MEDIEVAL MYSTERY SERIES"Frazer's quiet yet intense medieval mysteries are so vividly and gracefully written you just float back in time..." - The Poisoned Pen"There is action aplenty and intrigue in abundance." - Historical Novels Review"Frazer weaves historical details into the life of the fictitious nun... Whether good or evil, her characters are vibrant and compelling. While we might like to believe that the prejudices of that era have passed into history, we are reminded that we are not so very different after all." - Romantic Times Book ClubA Romantic Times Top Pick.Twice nominated for the Minnesota Book Award.Twice nominated for the Edgar Award.

There's a Rat in My Soup: Could You Survive Medieval Food?


Chana Stiefel - 2011
    Medieval royalty would eat giant feasts filled with strange and exotic dishes. So join in on the fun and find out what food was like during the Middle Ages in this reluctant reader book.

The Farce of the Fart and Other Ribaldries


Jody Enders - 2011
    For a real taste of saucy early European humor, one must cross the Channel to France. There, in the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries, the sophisticated met the scatological in popular performances presented by roving troupes in public squares that skewered sex, politics, and religion. For centuries, the scripts for these outrageous, anonymously written shows were available only in French editions gathered from scattered print and manuscript sources. Now prize-winning theater historian Jody Enders brings twelve of the funniest of these farces to contemporary English-speaking audiences in "The Farce of the Fart" and Other Ribaldries. Enders's translation captures the full richness of the colorful characters, irreverent humor, and over-the-top plotlines, all in a refreshingly uncensored American vernacular.Those who have never heard the one about the Cobbler, the Monk, the Wife, and the Gatekeeper should prepare to be shocked and entertained. "The Farce of the Fart" and Other Ribaldries is populated by hilarious characters high and low. For medievalists, theater practitioners, and classic comedy lovers alike, Enders provides a wealth of information about the plays and their history. Helpful details abound for each play about plot, character development, sets, staging, costumes, and props. This performance-friendly collection offers in-depth guidance to actors, directors, dramaturges, teachers, and their students."The Farce of the Fart" and Other Ribaldries puts fifteenth-century French farce in its rightful place alongside Chaucer, Shakespeare, commedia dell'arte, and Moliere--not to mention Monty Python. Vive la Farce!

The Performance of 16th-Century Music: Learning from the Theorists


Anne Smith - 2011
    Fundamental differences between 16th-century repertoire and that of later epochs thus tend to be overlooked-yet it is just these differences which can make a performance truly stunning.The Performance of 16th-Century Music will enable the performer to better understand this music and advance their technical and expressive abilities. Early music specialist Anne Smith outlines several major areas of technical knowledge and skill needed to perform the music of this period. She takes readers through the significance of part-book notation; solmization; rhythmic flexibility; and elements of structure in relation to rhetoric of the time; while familiarizing them with contemporary criteria and standards of excellence for performance. Through The Performance of 16th-Century Music, today's musicians will gain fundamental insight into how 16th-century polyphony functions, and the tools necessary to perform this repertoire to its fullest, most glorious potential.

The First Crusade: The Call from the East


Peter Frankopan - 2011
    But what if the First Crusade s real catalyst lay far to the east of Rome? In this groundbreaking book, countering nearly a millennium of scholarship, Peter Frankopan reveals the untold history of the First Crusade.Nearly all historians of the First Crusade focus on the papacy and its willing warriors in the West, along with innumerable popular tales of bravery, tragedy, and resilience. In sharp contrast, Frankopan examines events from the East, in particular from Constantinople, seat of the Christian Byzantine Empire. The result is revelatory. The true instigator of the First Crusade, we see, was the Emperor Alexios I Komnenos, who in 1095, with his realm under siege from the Turks and on the point of collapse, begged the pope for military support.Basing his account on long-ignored eastern sources, Frankopan also gives a provocative and highly original explanation of the world-changing events that followed the First Crusade. The Vatican s victory cemented papal power, while Constantinople, the heart of the still-vital Byzantine Empire, never recovered. As a result, both Alexios and Byzantium were consigned to the margins of history. From Frankopan s revolutionary work, we gain a more faithful understanding of the way the taking of Jerusalem set the stage for western Europe s dominance up to the present day and shaped the modern world."

The Production of Books in England 1350 1500


Alexandra Gillespie - 2011
    This book gathers the best new work on manuscript books in England made during this crucial but neglected period. Its authors survey existing research, gather intensive new evidence and develop new approaches to key topics. The chapters cover the material conditions and economy of the book trade; amateur production both lay and religious; the effects of censorship; and the impact on English book production of manuscripts and artisans from elsewhere in the British Isles and Europe. A wide-ranging and innovative series of essays, this volume is a major contribution to the history of the book in medieval England.

Theorizing Medieval Geopolitics: War and World Order in the Age of the Crusades


Andrew A. Latham - 2011
    Although these accounts differ significantly in terms of their respective analytical assumptions, theoretical concerns and scholarly contributions, they share at least one common OCo arguably, defining OCo element: a belief that a careful study of medieval geopolitics can help resolve a number of important debates surrounding the nature and dynamics of international relations. There are however three generic weaknesses characterizing the extant literature: a general failure to examine the existing historiography of medieval geopolitics, an inadequate account of the material and ideational forces that create patterns of violent conflict in medieval Latin Christendom, and a failure to take seriously the role of religion in the geopolitical relations of medieval Latin Christendom.This book seeks to address these shortcomings by providing a theoretically guided and historically sensitive account of the geopolitical relations of medieval Latin Christendom. It does this by developing a theoretically informed picture of medieval geopolitics, theorizing the medieval-to-modern transition in a new and fruitful way, and suggesting ways in which a systematic analysis of medieval geopolitical relations can actually help to illuminate a range of contemporary geopolitical phenomena. Finally, it develops an historically sensitive conceptual framework for understanding geopolitical conflict and war more generally."

Everything Castles: Capture These Facts, Photos, and Fun to Be King of the Castle! (National Geographic Kids)


Crispin Boyer - 2011
    Fun facts and photos, including reenactment shots, illuminate the lives of the inhabitants and the fascinating histories of castles.National Geographic supports K-12 educators with ELA Common Core Resources.Visit www.natgeoed.org/commoncore for more information.

Anglo-Saxon England: 400–790


Sally Crawford - 2011
    While traditionally the early centuries of Anglo-Saxon England have been disregarded as"'lost centuries," archaeological evidence, paired with the later written sources, can reveal a complex and often sophisticated society. This period saw the beginnings of urbanization, with the establishment of market-places enabling the trade of local and exotic goods, and the first schools were introduced in the 7th century.Sally Crawford looks at how the Anglo-Saxons lived, from the composition of an Anglo-Saxon family and how status was defined by an individual's occupation, to the complexities of feasting and drinking and how adults and children found entertainment.

Maimonides--Essential Teachings on Jewish Faith & Ethics: The Book of Knowledge & the Thirteen Principles of Faith--Annotated & Explained


Marc D. Angel - 2011
    A medieval philosopher whose vision covered an extensive range, he created a method of mediating between revelation and reason that laid the groundwork for a rational, philosophically sophisticated Judaism. He also provided an approach to biblical interpretation and philosophy that remains relevant for people of all faiths who follow a religion based on sacred text and oral interpretation.In this accessible examination of Maimonides's theological and philosophical teachings, Rabbi Marc D. Angel opens up for us Maimonides's views on the nature of God, providence, prophecy, free will, human nature, repentance and more. He explores basic concepts of faith that Maimonides posits must serve as the basis for proper religious life. He also examines Maimonides's insights on reward and punishment, messianic days, the world to come and other tenets of Jewish faith.Now you can experience the wisdom of Maimonides even if you have no previous knowledge of Judaism or Jewish philosophy. SkyLight Illuminations provides insightful yet unobtrusive commentary that reveals why Maimonides's teachings continue to have profound relevance to those seeking an intellectually vibrant understanding of Judaism.

Bede: 'On the Nature of Things' and 'On Times'


Bede - 2011
    Building on insights found in Isidore of Seville’s earlier work of the same name, On the Nature of Things addresses creation and recapitulates the idea of the four elements. In On Times, Bede breaks from Seville’s structure, separating out and considering the chapters on time. This work also introduces Bede’s computus—the practical yet intensely polemical science for determining the dates of Easter. Bede’s views are bound up with the integrity of nature as God’s creation and the theological significance of Christ’s death and resurrection, and these extensively annotated translations mark an essential contribution to the ecclesiastical history that is crucial to an understanding of early medieval science.

Why the Middle Ages Matter: Medieval Light on Modern Injustice


Celia Martin Chazelle - 2011
    Why the Middle Ages Matter refreshes our thinking about this historical era, and our own, by looking at some pressing concerns from today's world, asking how these issues were really handled in the medieval period, and showing why the past matters now. The contributors here cover topics such as torture, marriage, sexuality, imprisonment, refugees, poverty, work, the status of women, disability, race, political leadership and end of life care. They focus on a variety of regions, from North Africa and the Middle East, through Western and Central Europe, to the British Isles.This collection challenges many negative stereotypes of medieval people, revealing a world from which, for instance, much could be learned about looking after the spiritual needs of the dying, and about integrating prisoners into the wider community through an emphasis on reconciliation between victim and criminal. It represents a new level of engagement with issues of social justice by medievalists and provides a highly engaging way into studying the middle ages. All the essays are written so as to be accessible to students, and each is accompanied by a list of further readings.

Perceforest: The Prehistory of King Arthur's Britain


Unknown - 2011
    Justly described as -an encyclopaedia of 14th-century chivalry- and -a mine of folkloric motifs-, it is the subject of rapidly increasing attention and research. The author of Perceforest draws on Alexander romances, Roman histories and medieval travel writing (not to mention oral tradition, as he gives, for example, the distinctly racy first written version of the Sleeping Beauty story), to create a remarkable prehistory of King Arthur's Britain. It begins with the arrival in Britain of Alexander the Great. His follower Perceforest, the first of Arthur's Greek ancestors, is made king of the island and finds it infested by the -evil clan- of Darnant the Enchanter. Magic plays a dominant part in the adventures which follow, as Perceforest ousts Darnant's clan despite their supernatural powers. He founds the knightly order of the -Franc Palais-, an ideal of chivalric civilisation prefiguring the Round Table of Arthur and indeed that of Edward III. But that civilisation is, the author shows, all too fragile. The vast imaginative scope of Perceforest/I> is matched by its variety of tone, ranging from tales of love and enchantment to bawdy comedy, from glamorous tournaments to unvarnished descriptions of the havoc wrought by war. And the author's surprising view of pagan gods and the coming of Christianity is as fascinating as the prominence he gives to women and his understanding of how the world of chivalry should work. Because of its enormous length - it runs to over a million words - Nigel Bryant has provided a version which gives a complete account of every episode, linking extensive passages of translation, to make a manageable and highly readable version (including the previously unpublished Books Five and Six), of this remarkable and largely unexplored work. Nigel Bryant has worked as a producer for BBC Radio 3 and as head of drama at Marlborough College. This is his fourth major translation of medieval Arthurian romance.

Fairies in Medieval Romance


James Wade - 2011
    James Wade provides a counter-reading to theories of the Celtic origins of medieval fairies and suggests ways in which these unusual figures can help us think about the internal logics of medieval romance.

Richard of Saint Victor, on the Trinity: English Translation and Commentary


Ruben Angelici - 2011
    Those who have not dismissed it as incomprehensible gibberish have found it a battlefield for division and misunderstanding. Even Christians, who adhere to the faith of the Creeds, have often found such dogma difficult to grasp. Richard of Saint Victor, a twelfth-century Scottish monk and Prior in the Abbey of Saint Victor, is emblematic in this struggle: "I have often read that there is ... [only] one God... I have also read ... that he is one and triune... But I do not remember having read anything on the evidences for these assertions." Richard's theological response stems from a profoundly mystical life of prayer, which, in the Spirit, seeks to involve the mind, in continuation with the great Augustinian and Anselmian tradition. Ultimately, he presents a trinitarian model, intelligible to a Western context but which could also awake admiration from Greek theologians. Today Richard's dogmatics could represent a bridge for dialogue between different traditions. For the first time this theological masterpiece is being made available, unabridged, in English to allow a broader theological public to benefit from Richard's accomplishments. The translation offered here attempts to provide a clear and flowing text, while remaining as literally faithful as possible to the original Latin. Endorsements: "This first English translation of Richard of St. Victor's De Trinitate is a notable publishing event. Ruben Angelici's helpful introduction is both lively and learned. It is to be hoped that this project will renew the interest of theologians and philosophers in the stimulating theology of Richard of St. Victor." -Paul Helm Teaching Fellow Regent College, Vancouver "Ruben Angelici deserves great credit for his commentary and translation of Richard of St. Victor's On the Trinity. His scholarship is impeccable and insightful and his translation is accurate and lucid. This is a most welcome and much needed contribution to the theological academy." -Thomas Weinandy, O.F.M. Executive Director of the Secretariat for Doctrine United States Conference of Catholic Bishops Author Biography: Ruben Angelici is a Graduate of the University of Manchester. He holds degrees and expertise in theology, philosophy, biology, and music. He has been a sessional lecturer in dogmatic and historical theology at Nazarene Theological College, University of Manchester."

The Medieval Haggadah: Art, Narrative, and Religious Imagination


Marc Michael Epstein - 2011
    They include the earliest known surviving illuminated haggadah: the Birds' Head Haggadah, made in Mainz around 1300, in which many of the faces on the human figures depicted throughout are replaced with those of birds. Also presented is the Golden Haggadah from Barcelona, c. 1320-30, along with two Spanish "siblings," the Rylands Haggadah and its purported Brother, made between 1330 and 1340, which share similar iconography and style.Though the importance of these manuscripts is universally acknowledged, Epstein examines them with fresh and creative eyes, offering insightful solutions to long-unresolved questions concerning the meaning of the art contained within them. In addition, he uses these treasured volumes as a springboard to address broader issues in the study of Jewish thought and culture.

The Bride of Christ Goes to Hell: Metaphor and Embodiment in the Lives of Pious Women, 200-1500


Dyan Elliott - 2011
    Henceforth, the virgin as Christ's spouse was expected to manifest matronly modesty and due submission, hobbling virginity's ancient capacity to destabilize gender roles. In the early Middle Ages, the focus on virginity and the attendant anxiety over its possible loss reinforced the emphasis on claustration in female religious communities, while also profoundly disparaging the nonvirginal members of a given community.With the rising importance of intentionality in determining a person's spiritual profile in the high Middle Ages, the title of bride could be applied and appropriated to laywomen who were nonvirgins as well. Such instances of democratization coincided with the rise of bridal mysticism and a progressive somatization of female spirituality. These factors helped cultivate an increasingly literal and eroticized discourse: women began to undergo mystical enactments of their union with Christ, including ecstatic consummations and vivid phantom pregnancies. Female mystics also became increasingly intimate with their confessors and other clerical confidants, who were sometimes represented as stand-ins for the celestial bridegroom. The dramatic merging of the spiritual and physical in female expressions of religiosity made church authorities fearful, an anxiety that would coalesce around the figure of the witch and her carnal induction into the Sabbath.

All Things Medieval: An Encyclopedia of the Medieval World


Ruth A. Johnston - 2011
    The culture and lifestyle in the medieval world vary wildly depending on the specific area and the exact point within this ancient period in human history—an era that predates what is typically represented at Renaissance fairs by at least a century.All Things Medieval: An Encyclopedia of the Medieval World covers the widest definition of "medieval Europe" possible, not by covering history in the traditional, textbook manner of listing wars, leaders, and significant historic events, but by presenting detailed alphabetical entries that describe the artifacts of medieval Europe. By examining the hidden material culture and by presenting information about topics that few books cover--pottery, locks and keys, shoes, weaving looms, barrels, toys, pets, ink, kitchen utensils, and much more--readers get invaluable insights into the nature of life during that time period and area.The heartland European regions such as England, France, Italy, and Germany are covered extensively, and information regarding the objects of regions such as Byzantium, Muslim Spain, and Scandinavia are also included. For each topic of material culture, the entry considers the full scope of the medieval period--roughly 500-1450--to give the reader a historical perspective of related traditions or inventions and describes the craftsmen and tools that produced it.

Before the Normans: Southern Italy in the Ninth and Tenth Centuries


Barbara Kreutz - 2011
    Yet Southern Italy in the ninth and tenth centuries was a complex and vibrant world that deserves to be better understood. In "Before the Normans," Barbara M. Kreutz writes the first modern study in English of the land, political structures, and cultures of southern Italy in the two centuries before the Norman conquests. This was a pan-Meditteranean society, where the Roman past and Lombard-Germanic culture met Byzantine and Islamic civilization, creating a rich and unusual mix.

The Knights Dawning (The Crusades Series, #1)


James Batchelor - 2011
    The kingdom is embroiled in war and bankrupt, and the Crusades are rampaging through the Middle East. The Dawnings are a once-powerful family of English knights who are facing the bleak prospects of their declining power and imminent destruction at the hands of enemies that surround them both at home and abroad. The first book in the Crusades series, The Knights Dawning sets the stage for a titanic struggle for survival that could consume a family, a people, and a kingdom. The epic battles and action-packed scenes are coupled with deep characters and complex relationships that give the story a depth beyond ordinary adventure novels. Join the Dawnings as they feud over power, love, jealousies, and old grudges that threaten to destroy the family from within at the moment they most need to stand united.

Young Henry and the Dragon


Jeanne Kaufman - 2011
    His toes are cold and he can't even make a cup of tea. But when he tries to trick a very disagreeable dragon into snorting out a flame by making the dragon laugh, the dragon gets the last laugh.

Empires of Faith: The Fall of Rome to the Rise of Islam, 500-700


Peter Sarris - 2011
    The formation of a new social and economic order in western Europe in the fifth, sixth, and seventh centuries, and the ascendancy across the West of a new culture of military lordship, are placed firmly in the context of on-going connections and influence radiating outwards from the surviving Eastern Roman Empire, ruled from the great imperial capital of Constantinople. The East Roman (or 'Byzantine') Emperor Justinian's attempts to revive imperial fortunes, restore the empire's power in the West, and face down Constantinople's great superpower rival, the Sasanian Empire of Persia, are charted, as too are the ways in which the escalating warfare between Rome and Persia paved the way for the development of new concepts of 'holy war', the emergence of Islam, and the Arab conquests of the Near East. Processes of religious and cultural change are explained through examination of social, economic, and military upheavals, and the formation of early medieval European society is placed in a broader context of changes that swept across the world of Eurasia from Manchuria to the Rhine.Warfare and plague, holy men and kings, emperors, shahs, caliphs, and peasants all play their part in a compelling narrative suited to specialist, student, and general readership alike.

Halcyon Rising


Diana Bold - 2011
    When his brother captures a beautiful woman with a satchel full of amazing instruments, Sebastian is enlisted to help discern their purpose and discover where she came from. Rhoswen of Halcyon is unlike anyone Sebastian has ever known, and the answers he seeks will shatter his beliefs and force him to choose between love and duty.

Medieval Political Philosophy: A Sourcebook


Joshua Parens - 2011
    When it first appeared, it was the only anthology of medieval political philosophy to contain major texts from all three Western monotheistic traditions--Christianity, Judaism, and Islam--and that claim remains true today. This new edition of this classic text of political philosophy--revised and enlarged by Joshua Parens and Joseph C. Macfarland--will make accessible to today's students the insights of these profound medieval thinkers.Prior to the modern separation of religion from politics, these medieval thinkers explored a variety of approaches to the relation between religion and politics--approaches that prompted renewed interest in a world divided over how best to relate the two. For the authors gathered in this volume--including Alfarabi, Alghazali, Averroes, Maimonides, Judah Halevi, Thomas Aquinas, Boethius of Dacia, and Dante Alighieri among many others--there was a greater uniformity of general intention than at any other period. All of these authors studied the works of classical political philosophy and considered in a variety of ways the implications of this political thought for their contemporary situation in a monotheistic religious community.

Stories and Ballads of the Far Past Translated from the Norse (Icelandic and Faroese) with Introductions and Notes


Nora Kershaw Chadwick - 2011
    You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

The De re militari of Vegetius: The Reception, Transmission and Legacy of a Roman Text in the Middle Ages


Christopher Allmand - 2011
    Christopher Allmand analyses the medieval afterlife of the De Re Militari, tracing the growing interest in the text from the Carolingian world to the late Middle Ages, suggesting how the written word may have influenced the development of military practice in that period. While emphasising that success depended on a commander's ability to outwit the enemy with a carefully selected, well trained and disciplined army, the De Re Militari inspired other unexpected developments, such as that of the 'national' army, and helped create a context in which the role of the soldier assumed greater social and political importance. Allmand explores the significance of the text and the changes it brought for those who accepted the implications of its central messages.

A Common Justice: The Legal Allegiances of Christians and Jews Under Early Islam


Uriel I. Simonsohn - 2011
    Simonsohn examines the legislative response of Christian and Jewish religious elites to the problem posed by the appeal of their coreligionists to judicial authorities outside their communities. Focusing on the late seventh to early eleventh centuries in the region between Iraq in the east and present-day Tunisia in the west, Simonsohn explores the multiplicity of judicial systems that coexisted under early Islam to reveal a complex array of social obligations that connected individuals across confessional boundaries. By examining the incentives for appeal to external judicial institutions on the one hand and the response of minority confessional elites on the other, the study fundamentally alters our conception of the social history of the Near East in the early Islamic period.Contrary to the prevalent scholarly notion of a rigid social setting strictly demarcated along confessional lines, Simonsohn's comparative study of Christian and Jewish legal behavior under early Muslim rule exposes a considerable degree of fluidity across communal boundaries. This seeming disregard for religious affiliations threatened to undermine the position of traditional religious elites; in response, they acted vigorously to reinforce communal boundaries, censuring recourse to external judicial institutions and even threatening transgressors with excommunication.

The French in the Kingdom of Sicily, 1266-1305


Jean Dunbabin - 2011
    This original study of contact and exchange in the middle ages explores the significance of the many cultural, religious and political exchanges between the two countries, arguing that the links were more diverse and stronger than simply the rulers' family connections. Jean Dunbabin shows how influence flowed as much from south to north as vice versa, and that France was strongly influenced by the experiences of those who returned after years of fighting in the Regno. As well as considering the experiences of notable crusading families, she sheds new light on the career of Robert II d'Artois, who virtually ruled the Regno for six years before returning to France to remodel the government of Artois. This comparative history of two societies offers an important new perspective on medieval Western Europe.