Best of
Science

1995

The Making of the Atomic Bomb


Richard Rhodes - 1995
    From the theoretical discussions of nuclear energy to the bright glare of Trinity there was a span of hardly more than twenty-five years. What began as merely an interesting speculative problem in physics grew into the Manhattan Project, and then into the Bomb with frightening rapidity, while scientists known only to their peers -- Szilard, Teller, Oppenheimer, Bohr, Meitner, Fermi, Lawrence, and yon Neumann -- stepped from their ivory towers into the limelight.Richard Rhodes takes us on that journey step by step, minute by minute, and gives us the definitive story of man's most awesome discovery and invention.

The Magic School Bus Plants Seeds: A Book About How Living Things Grow


Bruce Degen - 1995
    Frizzle's class is growing a beautiful garden. But, Phoebe's plot is empty. Her flowers are back at her old school! So, the class climbs aboard the Magic School Bus. And, of course, the kids don't only go back to Phoebe's school, but they go inside one of Phoebe's flowers! Follow the kids' adventure and learn how living things grow.

The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark


Carl Sagan - 1995
    And yet, disturbingly, in today's so-called information age, pseudoscience is burgeoning with stories of alien abduction, channeling past lives, and communal hallucinations commanding growing attention and respect. As Sagan demonstrates with lucid eloquence, the siren song of unreason is not just a cultural wrong turn but a dangerous plunge into darkness that threatens our most basic freedoms.

The Magic School Bus Gets Baked in a Cake: A Book About Kitchen Chemistry


Joanna Cole - 1995
    Frizzle's birthday and the class tries to bake a cake but winds up inside it, learning about mixtures and reactions that occur when ingredients are put together.

The Gift of Pain


Paul W. Brand - 1995
    But it’s no utopia. It’s a colony for leprosy patients: a world where people literally feel no pain, and reap horrifying consequences.His work with leprosy patients in India and the United States convinced Dr. Paul Brand that pain truly is one of God’s great gifts to us. In this inspiring story of his fifty-year career as a healer, Dr. Brand probes the mystery of pain and reveals its importance. As an indicator that lets us know something is wrong, pain has a value that becomes clearest in its absence.The Gift of Pain looks at what pain is and why we need it. Together, the renowned surgeon and award-winning writer Philip Yancey shed fresh light on a gift that none of us want and none of us can do without.

The Magic School Bus Hops Home: A Book About Animal Habitats


Patricia Relf - 1995
    The class wants to help look for her. Ms. Frizzle says, "The best way to find a frog is to be a frog!" So, the kids take a ride on the Magic School Bus. Join them as they shrink to frog size and learn all about animal habitats!

Six Easy Pieces: Essentials of Physics By Its Most Brilliant Teacher


Richard P. Feynman - 1995
    This set couples a book containing the six easiest chapters from Richard P. Feynman's landmark work, Lectures on Physics—specifically designed for the general, non-scientist reader—with the actual recordings of the late, great physicist delivering the lectures on which the chapters are based. Nobel Laureate Feynman gave these lectures just once, to a group of Caltech undergraduates in 1961 and 1962, and these newly released recordings allow you to experience one of the Twentieth Century's greatest minds—as if you were right there in the classroom.

The Periodic Table


Primo Levi - 1995
    It has been named the best science book ever by the Royal Institution of Great Britain, and is considered to be Levi's crowning achievement.

An Anthropologist on Mars: Seven Paradoxical Tales


Oliver Sacks - 1995
    Paradoxical portraits of seven neurological patients, including a surgeon consumed by the compulsive tics of Tourette's syndrome unless he is operating; an artist who loses all sense of color in a car accident, but finds new creative power in black & white; & others.

Connections


James Burke - 1995
    He untangles the pattern of interconnecting events, the accidents of time, circumstance, and place that gave rise to major inventions of the world. Says Burke, "My purpose is to acquaint the reader with some of the forces that have caused change in the past, looking in particular at eight innovations - the computer, the production line, telecommunications, the airplane, the atomic bomb, plastics, the guided rocket, and television - which may be most influential in structuring our own futures.... Each one of these is part of a family of similar devices, and is the result of a sequence of closely connected events extending from the ancient world until the present day. Each has enormous potential for humankind's benefit - or destruction."

The Magic School Bus In The Haunted Museum: A Book About Sound


Linda Ward Beech - 1995
    The class hears lots of weird sounds. Ms. Frizzle and the kids enter at their own risk! But, once inside, they learn all about sound. You will, too, when you read this book.

The Magic School Bus Meets The Rot Squad: A Book About Decomposition


Linda Ward Beech - 1995
    Frizzle and her students embark on numerous entertaining scientific journeys. The books are based on the PBS television series.

About Time: Einstein's Unfinished Revolution


Paul Davies - 1995
     The eternal questions of science and religion were profoundly recast by Einstein's theory of relativity and its implications that time can be warped by motion and gravitation, and that it cannot be meaningfully divided into past, present, and future. In About Time, Paul Davies discusses the big bang theory, chaos theory, and the recent discovery that the universe appears to be younger than some of the objects in it, concluding that Einstein's theory provides only an incomplete understanding of the nature of time. Davies explores unanswered questions such as: * Does the universe have a beginning and an end? * Is the passage of time merely an illusion? * Is it possible to travel backward -- or forward -- in time? About Time weaves physics and metaphysics in a provocative contemplation of time and the universe.

The Day the Universe Changed: How Galileo's Telescope Changed the Truth


James Burke - 1995
    Based on the popular television documentary series, The Day the Universe Changed is a bestselling history that challenges the reader to decide whether there is absolute knowledge to discover - or whether the universe is "ultimately what we say it is."

Thinking in Pictures: My Life with Autism


Temple Grandin - 1995
    She also lectures widely on autism—because Temple Grandin is autistic, a woman who thinks, feels, and experiences the world in ways that are incomprehensible to the rest of us. In this unprecedented book, Grandin delivers a report from the country of autism. Writing from the dual perspectives of a scientist and an autistic person, she tells us how that country is experienced by its inhabitants and how she managed to breach its boundaries to function in the outside world. What emerges in Thinking in Pictures is the document of an extraordinary human being, one who, in gracefully and lucidly bridging the gulf between her condition and our own, sheds light on the riddle of our common identity.

Applied Cryptography: Protocols, Algorithms, and Source Code in C


Bruce Schneier - 1995
    … The book the National Security Agency wanted never to be published." –Wired Magazine "…monumental… fascinating… comprehensive… the definitive work on cryptography for computer programmers…" –Dr. Dobb's Journal"…easily ranks as one of the most authoritative in its field." —PC Magazine"…the bible of code hackers." –The Millennium Whole Earth CatalogThis new edition of the cryptography classic provides you with a comprehensive survey of modern cryptography. The book details how programmers and electronic communications professionals can use cryptography—the technique of enciphering and deciphering messages-to maintain the privacy of computer data. It describes dozens of cryptography algorithms, gives practical advice on how to implement them into cryptographic software, and shows how they can be used to solve security problems. Covering the latest developments in practical cryptographic techniques, this new edition shows programmers who design computer applications, networks, and storage systems how they can build security into their software and systems. What's new in the Second Edition? * New information on the Clipper Chip, including ways to defeat the key escrow mechanism * New encryption algorithms, including algorithms from the former Soviet Union and South Africa, and the RC4 stream cipher * The latest protocols for digital signatures, authentication, secure elections, digital cash, and more * More detailed information on key management and cryptographic implementations

Out of Control: The New Biology of Machines, Social Systems, and the Economic World


Kevin Kelly - 1995
    Out of Control chronicles the dawn of a new era in which the machines and systems that drive our economy are so complex and autonomous as to be indistinguishable from living things.

The Private Life of Plants: A Natural History of Plant Behaviour


David Attenborough - 1995
    In the program and book, both titled The Private Life of Plants, Attenborough treks through rainforests, mountain ranges, deserts, beaches, and home gardens to show us things we might never have suspected about the vegetation that surrounds us. With their extraordinary sensibility, plants compete endlessly for survival and interact with animals and insects: they can see, count, communicate, adjust position, strike, and capture. Attenborough makes the plant world a vivid place for readers, who in this book can enjoy the tour at their own pace, taking in the lively descriptions and nearly 300 full-color photos showing plants in close detail.The author reveals to us the aspects of plants' lives that seem hidden from view, such as fighting, avoiding or exploiting predators or neighbors, and struggling to find food, increase their territories, reproduce themselves, and establish their place in the sun. Among the most amazing examples, the acacia can communicate with other acacias and repel enemies that might eat their leaves, the orchid can impersonate female wasps to attract males and ensure the spreading of its pollen, the Venus's flytrap can take other organisms captive and consume them. Covering this remarkable range of information with enthusiasm and clarity, Attenborough helps us to look anew at the vegetation on which all life depends and which has an intriguing life of its own. He has created a booksure to please the plant lover and any other reader interested in exploring the natural world.

Advanced Pranic Healing


Choa Kok Sui - 1995
    It is a book filled with techniques and methods for using ch'i and color prana to produce more rapid healing. It explains the use of the eleven basic chakras, color prana, and preventative healing techniques. It provides treatments for various ailments such as gastrointestinal, urinary, reproductive, endocrine, skeletal, and muscular disorders, as well as tumors, cancers, and blood diseases. Master Choa discusses divine healing and how the miracle of health is available to us all.

Linear Algebra Done Right


Sheldon Axler - 1995
    The novel approach taken here banishes determinants to the end of the book and focuses on the central goal of linear algebra: understanding the structure of linear operators on vector spaces. The author has taken unusual care to motivate concepts and to simplify proofs. For example, the book presents - without having defined determinants - a clean proof that every linear operator on a finite-dimensional complex vector space (or an odd-dimensional real vector space) has an eigenvalue. A variety of interesting exercises in each chapter helps students understand and manipulate the objects of linear algebra. This second edition includes a new section on orthogonal projections and minimization problems. The sections on self-adjoint operators, normal operators, and the spectral theorem have been rewritten. New examples and new exercises have been added, several proofs have been simplified, and hundreds of minor improvements have been made throughout the text.

The Beginner's Guide to Constructing the Universe: The Mathematical Archetypes of Nature, Art, and Science


Michael S. Schneider - 1995
    This is a new view of mathematics, not the one we learned at school but a comprehensive guide to the patterns that recur through the universe and underlie human affairs. A Beginner's Guide to Constructing, the Universe shows you: Why cans, pizza, and manhole covers are round.Why one and two weren't considered numbers by the ancient Greeks.Why squares show up so often in goddess art and board games.What property makes the spiral the most widespread shape in nature, from embryos and hair curls to hurricanes and galaxies. How the human body shares the design of a bean plant and the solar system. How a snowflake is like Stonehenge, and a beehive like a calendar. How our ten fingers hold the secrets of both a lobster a cathedral, and much more.

Charles Darwin: Voyaging


Janet Browne - 1995
    Yet only now, with the publication of Voyaging, the first of two volumes that will constitute the definitive biography, do we have a truly vivid and comprehensive picture of Darwin as man and as scientist. Drawing upon much new material, supported by an unmatched acquaintance with both the intellectual setting and the voluminous sources, Janet Browne has at last been able to unravel the central enigma of Darwin's career: how did this amiable young gentleman, born into a prosperous provincial English family, grow into a thinker capable of challenging the most basic principles of religion and science? The dramatic story of Voyaging takes us from agonizing personal challenges to the exhilaration of discovery; we see a young, inquisitive Darwin gradually mature, shaping, refining, and finally setting forth the ideas that would at last fall upon the world like a thunderclap in The Origin of Species.Few lives of great men offer so much interest--and so many mysteries--as the life of Charles Darwin, the greatest figure of nineteenth-century science, whose ideas are still inspiring discoveries and controversies more than a hundred years after his death. Yet only now, with the publication of Voyaging, the first of two volumes that will constitute the definitive biography, do we have a truly vivid and comprehensive picture of Darwin as man and as scientist. Drawing upon much new material, supported by an unmatched acquaintance with both theintellectual setting and the voluminous sources, Janet Browne has at last been able to unravel the central enigma of Darwin's career: how did this amiable young gentleman, born into a prosperous provincial English family, grow into a thinker capable of challenging the most basic principles of religion and science? The dramatic story of Voyaging takes us from agonizing personal challenges to the exhilaration of discovery; we see a young, inquisitive Darwin gradually mature, shaping, refining, and finally setting forth the ideas that would at last fall upon the world like a thunderclap in The Origin of Species.

Reflections of Eden: My Years with the Orangutans of Borneo


Biruté M.F. Galdikas - 1995
    In 1971, at age twenty-five, Galdikas left the placid world of American academia for the remote jungles of Indonesian Borneo. Living with her husband in a primitive camp, she became surrogate mother to a "family" of ex-captive orangutans - and gradually adjusted to the blood-sucking leeches, swarms of carnivorous insects, and constant humidity that rotted her belongings in the first year. Her first son spent the early years of his life at Camp Leakey with adopted orangutans as his only playmates. The wild orangutans Galdikas studied and the ex-captives she rehabilitated became an extended family of characters no less vivid than her human companions. Throatpouch, a huge and irritable grouch, fought off rivals for the right to claim adolescent Priscilla as his mate. Handsome Cara at first tried to rid the forest of its human intruder by hurling dead branches at Galdikas from the canopy above. Little Sugito, rescued from a cramped cage and returned to the jungle claimed Galdikas as his mother and clung to her fiercely, night and day, for months. A groundbreaking chronicler of the orangutans' life cycle, Galdikas also describes the threats that increasingly menace them: the battles with poachers and loggers, the illicit trade in infant orangutans, the frustrations of official bureaucracy. Her story is a rare combination of personal epiphany, crucial scientific discovery, and international impact - a life of human and environmental challenge. Reflections of Eden is the third act of a drama that has captivated the world: the story of a pioneering primatologist, a world leader in conservation, and a remarkable woman.

The Lucifer Principle: A Scientific Expedition into the Forces of History


Howard Bloom - 1995
    The Lucifer Priciple is a revolutionary work that explores the intricate relationships among genetics, human behavior, and culture to put forth the thesis that “evil” is a by-product of nature’s strategies for creation and that it is woven into our most basic biological fabric.

The Magic School Bus Kicks Up A Storm: A Book About Weather


Joanna Cole - 1995
    A book about weather, from the animated television series on the Learning Channel.

Bird Brains: The Intelligence of Crows, Ravens, Magpies, and Jays


Candace Savage - 1995
    But according to naturalist Candace Savage, “bird brain,” as a pejorative expression, should be rendered obsolete by new research on the family of corvids: crows and their close relations.The ancients who regarded these remarkable birds as oracles, bringers of wisdom, or agents of vengeance were on the right track, for corvids appear to have powers of abstraction, memory, and creativity that put them on a par with many mammals, even higher primates. Bird Brains presents these bright, brassy, and surprisingly colorful birds in a remarkable collection of full-color, close-up photographs by some two dozen of the world’s best wildlife photographers.Savage’s lively, authoritative text describes the life and behavior of sixteen representative corvid species that inhabit North America and Europe. Drawing on recent research, she describes birds that recognize each other as individuals, call one another by “name,” remember and relocate thousands of hidden food caches, engage in true teamwork and purposeful play, and generally exhibit an extraordinary degree of sophistication.

The Perfect Machine: Building the Palomar Telescope


Ronald Florence - 1995
    As huge as the Pantheon of Rome and as heavy as the Statue of Liberty, this magnificent instrument is so precisely built that its seventeen-foot mirror was hand-polished to a tolerance of 2/1,000,000 of an inch. The telescope's construction drove some to the brink of madness, made others fearful that mortals might glimpse heaven, and transfixed an entire nation. Ronald Florence weaves into his account of the creation of "the perfect machine" a stirring chronicle of the birth of Big Science and a poignant rendering of an America mired in the depression yet reaching for the stars.

Bayesian Data Analysis


Andrew Gelman - 1995
    Its world-class authors provide guidance on all aspects of Bayesian data analysis and include examples of real statistical analyses, based on their own research, that demonstrate how to solve complicated problems. Changes in the new edition include:Stronger focus on MCMC Revision of the computational advice in Part III New chapters on nonlinear models and decision analysis Several additional applied examples from the authors' recent research Additional chapters on current models for Bayesian data analysis such as nonlinear models, generalized linear mixed models, and more Reorganization of chapters 6 and 7 on model checking and data collectionBayesian computation is currently at a stage where there are many reasonable ways to compute any given posterior distribution. However, the best approach is not always clear ahead of time. Reflecting this, the new edition offers a more pluralistic presentation, giving advice on performing computations from many perspectives while making clear the importance of being aware that there are different ways to implement any given iterative simulation computation. The new approach, additional examples, and updated information make Bayesian Data Analysis an excellent introductory text and a reference that working scientists will use throughout their professional life.

An Introduction to Modern Astrophysics


Bradley W. Carroll - 1995
    Designed for the junior- level astrophysics course, each topic is approached in the context of the major unresolved questions in astrophysics. The core chapters have been designed for a course in stellar structure and evolution, while the extended chapters provide additional coverage of the solar system, galactic structure, dynamics, evolution, and cosmology. * Two versions of this text are available: An Introduction to Modern Stellar Astrophysics, (Chapters 1-17), and An Introduction to Modern Astrophysics, (Chapters 1-28). * Computer programs included with the text allow students to explore the physics of stars and galaxies. * In designing a curriculum, instructors can combine core and extended chapters with the optional advanced sections so as to meet their individual goals. * Up-to-date coverage of current astrophysical discoveries are included. * This text emphasizes computational physics, including computer problems and on-line programs. * This text also includes a selection of over 500 problems. For additional information and computer codes to be used

The Quantum Theory of Fields: Volume I, Foundations


Steven Weinberg - 1995
    This is a two-volume work. Volume I introduces the foundations of quantum field theory. The development is fresh and logical throughout, with each step carefully motivated by what has gone before, and emphasizing the reasons why such a theory should describe nature. After a brief historical outline, the book begins anew with the principles about which we are most certain, relativity and quantum mechanics, and the properties of particles that follow from these principles. Quantum field theory emerges from this as a natural consequence. The author presents the classic calculations of quantum electrodynamics in a thoroughly modern way, showing the use of path integrals and dimensional regularization. His account of renormalization theory reflects the changes in our view of quantum field theory since the advent of effective field theories. The book's scope extends beyond quantum electrodynamics to elementary particle physics, and nuclear physics. It contains much original material, and is peppered with examples and insights drawn from the author's experience as a leader of elementary particle research. Problems are included at the end of each chapter. This work will be an invaluable reference for all physicists and mathematicians who use quantum field theory, and it is also appropriate as a textbook for graduate students in this area.

What Is Life?


Lynn Margulis - 1995
    The authors move deftly across a dazzling array of topics—from the dynamics of the bacterial realm, to the connection between sex and death, to theories of spirit and matter. They delve into the origins of life, offering the startling suggestion that life—not just human life—is free to act and has played an unexpectedly large part in its own evolution. Transcending the various formal concepts of life, this captivating book offers a unique overview of life’s history, essences, and future.Supplementing the text are stunning illustrations that range from the smallest known organism (Mycoplasma bacteria) to the largest (the biosphere itself). Creatures both strange and familiar enhance the pages of What Is Life? Their existence prompts readers to reconsider preconceptions not only about life but also about their own part in it.

Noah's Garden: Restoring the Ecology of Our Own Backyards


Sara Bonnett Stein - 1995
    The author's"wonderful book tells of her conversion from a high-style conventional gardner into an excellent field ecologist and a visionary with plans for ending the harreness of America's sub-subdivisions."

Biggest, Strongest, Fastest


Steve Jenkins - 1995
    The smallest mammal, the Etruscan shrew, could easily sleep in a teaspoon. In a striking full-color collage, each spread of Biggest, Strongest, Fastest portrays an animal that stands out in the animal world as the largest, slowest, longest lived. Readers can see the animal's size in relation to something familiar, and a chart on the last page indicates the size, weight, and diet of each animal, as well as where it can be found in the wild. Biggest, Strongest, Fastest is an entertaining, informative introduction to the "world records" held by fourteen members of the animal kingdom.

Killing Time: The Autobiography of Paul Feyerabend


Paul Karl Feyerabend - 1995
    Finished only weeks before his death in 1994, it is the self-portrait of one of this century's most original and influential intellectuals.Trained in physics and astronomy, Feyerabend was best known as a philosopher of science. But he emphatically was not a builder of theories or a writer of rules. Rather, his fame was in powerful, plain-spoken critiques of "big" science and "big" philosophy. Feyerabend gave voice to a radically democratic "epistemological anarchism:" he argued forcefully that there is not one way to knowledge, but many principled paths; not one truth or one rationality but different, competing pictures of the workings of the world. "Anything goes," he said about the ways of science in his most famous book, Against Method. And he meant it.Here, for the first time, Feyerabend traces the trajectory that led him from an isolated, lower-middle-class childhood in Vienna to the height of international academic success. He writes of his experience in the German army on the Russian front, where three bullets left him crippled, impotent, and in lifelong pain. He recalls his promising talent as an operatic tenor (a lifelong passion), his encounters with everyone from Martin Buber to Bertolt Brecht, innumerable love affairs, four marriages, and a career so rich he once held tenured positions at four universities at the same time.Although not written as an intellectual autobiography, Killing Time sketches the people, ideas, and conflicts of sixty years. Feyerabend writes frankly of complicated relationships with his mentor Karl Popper and his friend and frequent opponent Imre Lakatos, and his reactions to a growing reputation as the "worst enemy of science."

Mr. Wilson's Cabinet Of Wonder: Pronged Ants, Horned Humans, Mice on Toast, and Other Marvels of Jurassic Technology


Lawrence Weschler - 1995
    But which ones? As he guides readers through an intellectual hall of mirrors, Lawrence Weschler revisits the 16th-century "wonder cabinets" that were the first museums and compels readers to examine the imaginative origins of both art and science. Illustrations.

Red Earth, White Lies: Native Americans and the Myth of Scientific Fact


Vine Deloria Jr. - 1995
    Claiming that science has created a largely fictional scenario for American Indians in prehistoric North America, Deloria offers an alternative view of the continent's history as seen through the eyes and memories of Native Americans. Further, he warns future generations of scientists not to repeat the ethnocentric omissions and fallacies of the past by dismissing Native oral tradition as mere legends.

Obstetric Myths Versus Research Realities: A Guide to the Medical Literature


Henci Goer - 1995
    And while the evidence in the medical literature may be solidly, often unequivocably, against whatever the doctor said, without access to that evidence, the pregnant woman is quite reasonably going to follow her doctor. This book is an attempt to make the medical literature on a variety of key obstetric issues accessible to people who lack the time, expertise, access, or proximity to a medical library to research concerns on their own. This compact, accurate, yet understandable reference is designed for people without medical training and organized for easy access.After an introductory chapter giving basic information about the different types of medical studies, how to evaluate them, and some basic statistical concepts, Goer provides chapters on cesarean issues, pregnancy and labor management, and a review of alternative approaches. Each chapter begins with a stated myth, followed by an examination of the reality. Goer then analyzes the mainstream belief, pointing out its fallacies. Then comes a list of significant points gleaned from the studies and keyed to her abstracts. Next is the outline by which the abstracts are grouped. Finally come the numbered abstracts of relevant articles published, in most cases, after 1980. The book concludes with a glossary of medical terms and an index. This compact, accurate, and understandable reference tool is designed for people without medical training as well as care givers.

Great White Shark


Richard Ellis - 1995
    It is based on extensive research into the scientific literature and lore of this superbly adapted predator, on analysis of historical records, and on the most up-to-date information. The book is illustrated with 238 photographs and drawings, 116 in color.

Inventions, Researches and Writings of Nikola Tesla


Nikola Tesla - 1995
    During the early twentieth century Tesla blazed the path that electrical development followed for many years to come, and this book brings together many of the finding and theories that made him famous.

Concepts of Modern Mathematics


Ian Stewart - 1995
    Based on the abstract, general style of mathematical exposition favored by research mathematicians, its goal was to teach students not just to manipulate numbers and formulas, but to grasp the underlying mathematical concepts. The result, at least at first, was a great deal of confusion among teachers, students, and parents. Since then, the negative aspects of "new math" have been eliminated and its positive elements assimilated into classroom instruction.In this charming volume, a noted English mathematician uses humor and anecdote to illuminate the concepts underlying "new math": groups, sets, subsets, topology, Boolean algebra, and more. According to Professor Stewart, an understanding of these concepts offers the best route to grasping the true nature of mathematics, in particular the power, beauty, and utility of pure mathematics. No advanced mathematical background is needed (a smattering of algebra, geometry, and trigonometry is helpful) to follow the author's lucid and thought-provoking discussions of such topics as functions, symmetry, axiomatics, counting, topology, hyperspace, linear algebra, real analysis, probability, computers, applications of modern mathematics, and much more.By the time readers have finished this book, they'll have a much clearer grasp of how modern mathematicians look at figures, functions, and formulas and how a firm grasp of the ideas underlying "new math" leads toward a genuine comprehension of the nature of mathematics itself.

Grossology


Sylvia Branzei - 1995
    Sometimes it's crusty. And sometimes it's slimy. But hey, it's your body. Most of the time you don't find your own smells and scabs and oozes too disgusting. It's usually the same stuff on someone else's body that's really gross. But the reasons for the ickiness are identical whether it's you, your uncle, or the kid down the street. So as an Official Grossologist, you will find out a lot of sickening things about everyone.

In Search of a Better World: Lectures and Essays from Thirty Years


Karl Popper - 1995
    His subjects range from the beginnings of scientific speculation in classical Greece to the destructive effects of twentieth century totalitarianism, from major figures of the Enlightenment such as Kant and Voltaire to the role of science and self-criticism in the arts. The essays offer striking new insights into the mind of one of the greatest twentieth century philosophers.

What's Smaller Than a Pygmy Shrew?


Robert E. Wells - 1995
    A ladybug is even smaller. But in this book you will find small things you could not ordinarily see.

The Company of Wolves


Peter Steinhart - 1995
    This authoritative and eloquent book coaxes the wolf out from its camouflage of myth and reveals the depth of its kinship with humanity, which shares this animal's complex complex social organization, intense family ties, and predatory streak.

Sky Tree: Seeing Science Through Art


Thomas Locker - 1995
    In autumn, leaves fall as squirrels scamper up the trunk carrying nuts. And on a winter night, a backdrop of twinkling stars shines through the branches. Each day, the tree changes with the purple and pink of a sunset or a nip of cold air. But the tree is more than a thing of beauty—its changes represent the passage of time in nature.Sky Tree combines the artistic beauty and the scientific wonder of ever-changing nature into a satisfying experience for the soul and the mind.Each page poses a discussion question, and at the back of the book is an explanation of how Thomas Locker created each beautiful oil painting.

National Audubon Society Field Guide to African Wildlife


Peter Alden - 1995
    This guide is packed with nearly 600 stunning color photographs of African habitats and animals, and provides a wealth of information on more than 850 species compiled by veteran safari leaders and experts in African wildlife. The parks and reserves for which the continent is famous are described in thorough detail, taking the reader on an unforgettable virtual safari.

Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics


Roger Walker - 1995
    It covers treatment of common diseases as well as other medical, therapeutic and patient related issues. Written by both pharmacists and clinicians to reflect a team approach, it offers an in-depth analysis of drug therapy in the treatment of disease, relying on input from the pharmacist as a member of the "team" in hospital and community settings. Information is easy to locate in a logical format organized primarily by systems and disorders.

At Home in the Universe: The Search for the Laws of Self-Organization and Complexity


Stuart A. Kauffman - 1995
    At its heart is the discovery of the order that lies deep within the most complex of systems, from the origin of life, to the workings of giant corporations, to the rise and fall of great civilizations. And more than anyone else, this revolution is the work of one man, Stuart Kauffman, a MacArthur Fellow and visionary pioneer of the new science of complexity. Now, in At Home in the Universe, Kauffman brilliantly weaves together the excitement of intellectual discovery and a fertile mix of insights to give the general reader a fascinating look at this new science - and at the forces for order that lie at the edge of chaos.

Shark Lady: True Adventures of Eugenie Clark


Ann McGovern - 1995
    She has dived with many sharks. Once she explored an underwater sharks' cave in México."There I was, face to face with one of the sea's most deadly denizens, in the most dangerous situation possible... and I'd never been more thrilled. It was an unforgettable moment in my life".

Sharks


Seymour Simon - 1995
    Acclaimed science writer Seymour Simon sets the record straight. Sharks are serious predators, but more people are killed in car accidents during a single holiday weekend than have been killed by sharks in the past hundred years.

A New Science of Life: The Hypothesis of Morphic Resonance


Rupert Sheldrake - 1995
    For instance, when laboratory rats have learned a new maze, rats elsewhere seem to learn it more easily. Rupert Sheldrake describes this process as morphic resonance, in which the forms and behaviours of the past shape living organisms in the present.

Reason in Revolt: Dialectical Philosophy and Modern Science


Alan Woods - 1995
    First exposed by Marx and Engels, Dialectical Materialism is a comprehensive methodology explaining the unity of the laws that govern nature, science and society, from evolution to chaos theory, nuclear physics to childhood development. First published in 1995 to coincide with Engel's centenary, Reason in Revolt has had a great success around the world. It has been published in Spanish, Italian, Greek, Turkish, Urdu, and is now being translated into German and Flemish. The Spanish edition recently went into its second edition. To date, no one has found serious fault with the science of the book. And every new discovery of science serves to confirm the statement of Engels, that "in the last analysis, Nature works dialectically."

The Myth of the Framework: In Defence of Science and Rationality


Karl Popper - 1995
    The Myth of the Framework is a new collection of some of Popper's most important material on this subject.Sir Karl discusses such issues as the aims of science, the role that it plays in our civilization, the moral responsibility of the scientist, the structure of history, and the perennial choice between reason and revolution. In doing so, he attacks intellectual fashions (like positivism) that exagerrate what science and rationality have done, as well as intellectual fashions (like relativism) that denigrate what science and rationality can do. Scientific knowledge, according to Popper, is one of the most rational and creative of human achievements, but it is also inherently fallible and subject to revision.In place of intellectual fashions, Popper offers his own critical rationalism - a view that he regards both as a theory of knowlege and as an attitude towards human life, human morals and democracy.Published in cooperation with the Central European University.

Factory Physics


Wallace J. Hopp - 1995
    It also examines operating policies and strategic objectives, and presents the concepts of manufacturing processes and controls within a physics or laws of nature analogy. Topics such as JIT, TQM, constraint theory, and other advances in the field are also covered.

The Butterfly Alphabet Book


Brian Cassie - 1995
    Jerry Pallotta and Brian Cassie's fun, informative text, accompanied by Mark Astrella's detailed and breathtaking illustrations, will be a sure favorite with both the young butterfly lover and the experienced lepidopterist!

Secrets of the Night Sky: Most Amazing Things in the Universe You Can See with the Naked Eye, The


Bob Berman - 1995
    From blue moons to Betelgeuse, it's all in this witty, fact-packed, profusely illustrated guide to the heavens by the author of Discover magazine's popular "Night Watchman" column.

The Psychoanalytic Theory of Neurosis


Otto Fenichel - 1995
    Investigating the relationship between biological needs and external influences—the tensions and inhibitions that nurture neuroses—Fenichel concludes that "neuroses are social diseases," arising from the demands of civilization on the developing organism. For this 50th anniversary edition, distinguished psychoanalyst Leo Rangell has written an introduction to set the context of Fenichel's work and an epilogue to describe its influence.

Living Energies: Viktor Scahuberger's Brilliant Work with Natural Energy Explained


Callum Coats - 1995
    He frequently asserted, -Water is a living substance!- - an ideal to which many philosophers have subscribed.With his ground-breaking concepts on energy, biomagnetism and the true function of trees, he showed how a world that exploited its resources rather than cherishing them was doomed to destroy itself. Above all, he demonstrated how Nature's abundance is the result of a complex interaction of energies that actually create matter, not the other way around as orthodox science believes. For him energy was primary, and physical form the secondary effect.

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English


Addison Wesley Longman - 1995
    It also pinpoints the language patterns and grammar unique to spoken English. The 2000-word Longman Defining Vocabulary is made up of words students already know, and the dictionary's definitions have been written using this familiar set of core words.

The Major Transitions in Evolution


John Maynard Smith - 1995
    These transitions include the origin of life itself, the first eukaryotic cells, reproduction by sexual means, the appearance of multicellular plants and animals, the emergence of cooperation and of animal societies, and the unique language ability of humans. This ambitious book provides the first unified discussion of the full range of these transitions. The authors highlight the similarities between different transitions--between the union of replicating molecules to form chromosomes and of cells to form multicellular organisms, for example--and show how understanding one transition sheds light on others. They trace a common theme throughout the history of evolution: after a major transition some entities lose the ability to replicate independently, becoming able to reproduce only as part of a larger whole. The authors investigate this pattern and why selection between entities at a lower level does not disrupt selection at more complex levels. Their explanation encompasses a compelling theory of the evolution of cooperation at all levels of complexity. Engagingly written and filled with numerous illustrations, this book can be read with enjoyment by anyone with an undergraduate training in biology. It is ideal for advanced discussion groups on evolution and includes accessible discussions of a wide range of topics, from molecular biology and linguistics to insect societies.

The Archaeology of Disease


Charlotte Roberts - 1995
    Charlotte Roberts and Keith Manchester offer a vivid picture of ancient disease and trauma by combining the results of scientific research with information gathered from documents, other areas of archaeology, art, and ethnography. The book contains information on congenital, infectious, dental, joint, endocrine, and metabolic diseases. The authors provide a clinical context for specific ailments and accidents and consider the relevance of ancient demography, basic bone biology, funerary practices, and prehistoric medicine. This fully revised third edition has been updated to and encompasses rapidly developing research methods of in this fascinating field.

Who Is Fourier? a Mathematical Adventure


Transnational College of Lex - 1995
    This is done in a way that is not only easy to understand, but is actually fun! Professors and engineers, with high school and college students following closely, comprise the largest percentage of our readers. It is a must-have for anyone interested in music, mathematics, physics, engineering, or complex science. Dr. Yoichiro Nambu, 2008 Nobel Prize Winner in Physics, served as a senior adviser to the English version of Who is Fourier? A Mathematical Adventure.

Infinite Mind: Science of the Human Vibrations of Consciousness


Valerie V. Hunt - 1995
    Infinite Mind: Science of the Human Vibrations of Consciousness presents the first comprehensive human energy field model based on 25 years of sophisticated electronic field research and extensive clinical studies. It clarifies metaphysical deductions from physics, evaluates clinical suppositions, and should supercede the ancient inadequate explanations of the past. The reader is taken on a journey of discovery into the vibrant electromagnetic radiation field as it changes during human interaction and with environmental conditions. Simple research graphics show the correlations of field waves and auric colors and the field coherency and anti-coherency in health and illness. The authors major discovery of the human filed chaos pattern, the first ever demonstrated in biological systems, has profound implications for healing. These energy field findings, combined with human interest stories, lead to stunning new information about the mind and body, the emotions and creativity, extrasensory human capacities in higher consciousness, and the mystical connections of spirit.

Calculus with Analytic Geometry


George F. Simmons - 1995
    It takes an intuitive approach to calculus and focuses on the application of methods to real-world problems. Throughout the text, calculus is treated as a problem solving science of immense capability.

Trees, Leaves & Bark


Diane L. Burns - 1995
    Safety tips are provided and interesting activities are sugested. Color illustrations enhance the presentation. ---HORN BOOKS (Tracks, Scats and Signs)

Ebola


William T. Close - 1995
    Close worked desperately to contain the outbreak. Haunted by this wrenching crisis, Dr. Close felt compelled to honor the memory of the courageous people he knew and lost. This is their story: a terrifying, completely authentic novel that begins with an invisible killer.  It strikes without warning—a lethal disease with no name . . . and no cure.   At a Catholic mission in Yambuku, a remote village sixty miles south of the Ebola River, local teacher Mabalo Lokela visits the clinic with a raging fever. Sister Lucie, a Flemish nun and nurse, gives him a shot of an antimalarial drug, wipes off the syringe, and awaits her next patient. Within days, Mabalo is dead. Soon, others are falling ill. Less than three weeks later, the virus claims Sister Lucie’s life as well. Panic erupts, but as the villagers attempt to flee, all roads leading out of Yambuku are closed off, the dying forced back. And as the single radio connecting the mission to the outside world brings only bad news, the valiant nuns and medical personnel left behind have no choice but to pray, and wonder: Will they survive long enough for help to arrive?

Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering


Leonard S. Bobrow - 1995
    The text is divided into four parts: circuits, electronics, digital systems, and electromagnetics. Although it delves in depth into each of these topics, the text represents more than your basic survey of the basics of electrical engineering. A solid understanding of the fundamental principles on which modern electrical engineering is based is also provided. This edition includes a chapter on circuit analysis software SPICE, with a detailed discussion of the PC version known as PSPICE (from MicroSim Corp.). Numerous drill exercises have been added to this new edition, reinforcing ideas presented in the examples. There are over 1,000 end-of-chapter problems. This text is suitable for a variety of electrical engineering courses. It can be used as a text for an introduction to electrical engineering for both majors and non-majors or both, or can be split and the various chapters utilized for an introduction to circuits course, a first electronics course, or for a course on digital electronics and logic design.

Color [With 5 Transparent Pages]


Ruth Heller - 1995
    Young readers and artists will enjoy peeling away the transparent overlays to discover how primary colors are mixed, and how a full-color painting breaks down into its primary colors.* A Picture Puffin * Full-color illustrations * 40 pages * 5 transparencies* Ages 5 up* An American Bookseller "Pick of the Lists"* An IRA-CBC Children's Choice Book* Parenting Magazine Reading Magic Award* Kansas State Reading Circle* Ohio Teachers' and Pupils' Reading Circle

An Introduction to the Philosophy of Science


Rudolf Carnap - 1995
    The present volume is an outgrowth of that seminar, which dealt with the philosophical foundations of physics. Edited by Martin Gardner from transcripts of Carnap's classroom lectures and discussions, the book remains one of the clearest and soundest introductions to the philosophy of science.Specially designed to appeal to a wide range of readers, An Introduction to thePhilosophy of Science offers accessible coverage of such topics as laws and probability, measurement and quantitative language, the structure of space, causality and determinism, theoretical laws and concepts and much more. Stimulating and thought-provoking, the text will be of interest to philosophers, scientists and anyone interested in logical analysis of the concepts, statements and theories of science. Its clear and readable style help make it "the best book available for the intelligent reader who wants to gain some insight into the nature of contemporary philosophy of science" ― Choice. Foreword to the Basic Books Paperback Edition, 1974 (Gardner); Preface (Carnap); Foreword to the Dover Edition (Gardner). 35 black-and-white illustrations. Bibliography.

A Guide to the Birds of Mexico and Northern Central America


Steve N.G. Howell - 1995
    But he also arrived without an adequate field guide. Indeed, to his surprise, he found that relatively little was known (and even less written) about the myriad of bird species that inhabit the region stretching from the U.S.-Mexican border to Nicaragua. And so, after eleven years of research in northern Central America, and with the essential collaboration of Sophie Webb--a biologist and one of the most talented ornithological illustrators working today--we now have the definitive guide to birds of this fascinating region. drop rest as varied as the Laysan Albatross, the Blue-footed Booby, the Collared Trogon, even the rare Guadalupe Storm-Petrel.A Guide to the Birds of Mexico and Northern Central America is astonishingly comprehensive, covering the identification, status, and distribution of all 1,070 birds species known from Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, El Salvador, Honduras, and western Nicaragua. No other book approaches the thoroughness of this unique field guide. Beautifully illustrated with seventy-one color plates and thirty-nine black and white drawings, the guide shows 750 species and includes many plumages never before depicted. Of special interest are illustrations of some of the most notoriously difficult groups to portray, such as raptors in flight, owls, and nightjars. In addition, superb, easy-to-read maps help the traveling birder locate particular--even rare--species, and the entries describing individual birds detail their appearance, voice, habitat, behavior (including nesting and eggs), and distribution. With the U.S. birder in mind, the guide also includes birds that can be seen north of the border, showing these American migrants on plates when they could be confused with similar Mexican species, thus enabling the birder to make quick and ready comparisons in the field. And, with readable and fascinating presentations of the natural history of Central American birds, this guide will be welcomed not only by seasoned birders, but by any traveler exploring the rain forests, coastlines, and deserts of Mexico and the Central American isthmus. Sponsored by the distinguished Point Reyes Observatory in California, A Guide to the Birds of Mexico and Northern Central America is a wonderful addition to the library of birders, nature enthusiasts, and travelers alike. With its lavish illustrations, clear writing, and unprecedented range, it offers hours of compelling reading and pleasant browsing for anyone intrigued by the colorful diversity of birds and the wild, largely unspoiled world next door.

Dark Nature: A Natural History of Evil


Lyall Watson - 1995
    With Dark Nature, world naturalist Lyall Watson presents a scientific examination of evil. Drawing on the latest insights of genetics, evolutionary ethology, anthropology and psychology, he takes the discussion of evil out of the realm of monsters and demons to reveal it for what it truly is: A biological reality that may be terrifying but can be controlled. Groundbreaking, fascinating and eminently readable, Dark Nature is a vital and timely antidote to modern despair.

Thinking & Destiny: Being the Science of Man


Harold W. Percival - 1995
    It deals with the age-old question, Quo Vadis? Where did we come from? Why are we here? Where are we going?

Grassland: The History, Biology, Politics and Promise of the American Prairie


Richard Manning - 1995
    Taking a critical look at this little-understood biome, award-winning journalist Richard Manning urges the reclamation of this land, showing how the grass is not only our last connection to the natural world, but also a vital link to our own prehistoric roots, our history, and our culture. Framing his book with the story of the remarkable elk, whose mysterious wanderings seem to reclaim his ancestral plains, Manning traces the expansion of America into what was then viewed as the American desert and considers our attempts over the last two hundred years to control unpredictable land through plowing, grazing, and landscaping. He introduces botanists and biologists who are restoring native grasses, literally follows the first herd of buffalo restored to the wild prairie, and even visits Ted Turner's progressive--and controversial--Montana ranch. In an exploration of the grasslands that is both sweeping and intimate, Manning shows us how we can successfully inhabit this and all landscapes.

Longitude: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greatest Scientific Problem of His Time


Dava Sobel - 1995
    Lacking the ability to measure their longitude, sailors throughout the great ages of exploration had been literally lost at sea as soon as they lost sight of land. Thousands of lives, and the increasing fortunes of nations, hung on a resolution.The scientific establishment of Europe—from Galileo to Sir Issac Newton—had mapped the heavens in both hemispheres in its certain pursuit of a celestial answer. In stark contrast, one man, John Harrison, dared to imagine a mechanical solution—a clock that would keep precise time at sea, something no clock had ever been able to do on land. Longitude is a dramatic human story of an epic scientific quest and Harrison's forty-year obsession with building his perfect timekeeper, known today as the chronometer. Full of heroism and chicanery, it is also a fascinating brief history of astronomy, navigation, and clock-making, and opens a new window on our world.On its 10th anniversary, a gift edition of this classic book, with a forward by one of history's greatest explorers, and eight pages of color illustrations.

Review Questions and Answers for Veterinary Technicians [With CDROM]


Thomas P. Colville - 1995
    This new and updated edition matches the presentation of the exam and reflects the seven domains of the VTNE to ensure the most accurate and effective exam prep available.

The Book of Numbers


John H. Conway - 1995
    Whether it is a visualization of the Catalan numbers or an explanation of how the Fibonacci numbers occur in nature, there is something in here to delight everyone. The diagrams and pictures, many of which are in color, make this book particularly appealing and fun. A few of the discussions may be confusing to those who are not adept mathematicians; those who are may be irked that certain facts are mentioned without an accompanying proof. Nonetheless, The Book of Numbers will succeed in infecting any reader with an enthusiasm for numbers.

Somewhere in the World Right Now


Stacey Schuett - 1995
    School Library Journal called Stacey Schuett's stunning authorial debut "a book that is perfect for sparking an interest in geography, emphasizing the amazing concept that at the same moment we are getting ready to sleep, other people are starting a new day." And in a starred review, Publishers Weekly added, "Schuett proves as nimble with words as with a paintbrush."  It's a good-night wish that circles the globe.

Cousteau's Great White Shark


Jean-Michel Cousteau - 1995
    To learn more about this formidable ocean dweller, the Cousteau team mounted a two-and-a-half year expedition to the south coast of Australia involving some 40 scientists, divers, cameramen, and sailors. This is the story, in words, photographs, and drawings, of the study and all that was learned from it about shark behaviour and biology. Myths and lore about the great white are dispelled, leaving an indelible image of a powerful predator of the seas.

Dictionary of Mathematics Terms


Douglas Downing - 1995
    Also useful to professionals who use math on the job. Approximately 700 math terms are defined. Includes illustrative diagrams.

Food Plants of Coastal First Peoples


Nancy J. Turner - 1995
    Turner describes more than 100 plants traditionally harvested and eaten by coastal aboriginal groups. Each description contains botanical details and a colour photograph to help identify the plant, information on where to find it, and a discussion on traditional methods of harvesting and preparation.This popular book remains an essential guide for anyone interested in wild edible plants or traditional cultures of First Peoples living on the coast of British Columbia and adjacent areas in Alaska and Washington.

The Undivided Universe: An Ontological Interpretation of Quantum Theory


David Bohm - 1995
    They develop an interpretation of quantum mechanics which gives a clear, intuitive understanding of its meaning and in which there is a coherent notion of the reality of the universe without assuming a fundamental role for the human observer. With the aid of new concepts such as active information together with non-locality, they provide a comprehensive account of all the basic features of quantum mechanics, including the relativistic domain and quantum field theory. It is shown that, with the new approach, paradoxical or unsatisfactory features associated with the standard approaches, such as the wave-particle duality and the collapse of the wave function, do not arise. Finally, the authors make new suggestions and indicate some areas in which one may expect quantum theory to break down in a way that will allow for a test.The Undivided Universe is an important book especially because it provides a different overall world view which is neither mechanistic nor reductionist. This view will ultimately have radical implications not only in physics but also in our general approach to all areas of life.

Murder by Injection: The Story of the Medical Conspiracy Against America


Eustace Clarence Mullins - 1995
    This book aims to shed light on profits from cancer, medical quackery, fertilizers, contamination of the food supply and numerous other eye-opening problems we face.

Plants of the Western Boreal Forest & Aspen Parkland


Derek Johnson - 1995
    Over 620 species of trees, shrubs, wildflowers, grasses, ferns, mosses and lichens are illustrated and described, covering the northern forest from Alaska to Minnesota.

The Case of the Frozen Addicts


J. William Langston - 1995
    Doctors were baffled, until neurologist J. William Langston, recognizing the symptoms of advanced Parkinson's disease, administered L-dopa - the only known effective treatment - and "unfroze" his patient. Dr. Langston determined that this patient and five others had all used the same tainted batch of synthetic heroin, inadvertently laced with a toxin that had destroyed an area of their brains essential to normal movement. This same area, the substantia nigra, slowly deteriorates in Parkinson's disease. As scientists raced to capitalize on this breakthrough, Dr. Langston struggled to salvage the lives of his frozen patients, for whom L-dopa provided only short-term relief. The solution he found lay in the most daring area of research: fetal-tissue transplants. The astonishing recovery of two of his patients garnered worldwide press coverage, helped overturn federal restrictions on fetal-tissue research, and offered hope to millions suffering from Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and other degenerative brain disorders.

The Domestic Dog: Its Evolution, Behaviour and Interactions with People


James Serpell - 1995
    They were probably the first animal species to become domesticated, but their relationship with humans has always been ambivalent. Dogs form strong attachments to humans, even in the face of rejection and punishment, voluntarily allying themselves to us as faithful companions, uncomplaining child-substitutes, enduring workers, and excellent hunters and guards. Yet they are also reviled as vicious killers, unclean scavengers and outcasts. In this book, the many facets of dog behavior are set in the context of the dog's place in our society. Based on firm scientific research, the book dispells many myths and stereotypes about our canine friends, and it will be the definitive reference work on dog behavior for many years to come. Dog-lovers with an interest in understanding how and why dogs behave as they do will find this fascinating reading.

The Axemaker's Gift


James Burke - 1995
    In this journey through human culture, historian James Burke and psychologist Robert Ornstein take a look at history, seeking to explain how the most innovative and brilliant animal ever could have both invented so much and landed us in the precarious spot we are in today, with resources shrinking, population ballooning, and the ecosystem in trouble.

Statistics As Principled Argument


Robert P. Abelson - 1995
    Abelson delves into the too-often dismissed problems of interpreting quantitative data and then presenting them in the context of a coherent story about one's research. Unlike too many books on statistics, this is a remarkably engaging read, filled with fascinating real-life (and real-research) examples rather than with recipes for analysis. It will be of true interest and lasting value to beginning graduate students and seasoned researchers alike.

Accounting, the Basis for Business Decisions


Robert F. Meigs - 1995
    While accounting majors receive exposure to and practice with accounting procedures,terms,and concepts as they prepare for the Intermediate course,non-majors take away an understanding of the role of accounting information in business decisions.

The Quantum Enigma: Finding The Hidden Key


Wolfgang Smith - 1995
    This book begins with the major recognition that each of these suffers from a certain residual Cartesianism that has been smuggled in unconsciously. It turns out that the moment one discards this hidden and problematic premise, quantum theory begins to make sense in a way that it never has before. As the author shows, it is now possible, for the first time, to integrate the findings of quantum physics into a world view that is neither forced nor ad hoc, but conforms to the permanent intuitions of mankind.Surprisingly, this treatise can be read not only by scientists, but also by readers unacquainted with the technical conceptions of physics or the quantum-reality literature.Wolfgang Smith graduated from Cornell University at age eighteen with majors in physics, philosophy, and mathematics. After taking an M.S. in physics at Purdue he pursued research in aerodynamics, where his papers on diffusion fields have provided the theoretical key to the solution of the re-entry problem for space flight. After receiving a Ph.D. in mathematics from Columbia University, Dr. Smith held faculty positions at M.I.T, U.C.L.A., and Oregon State University, where he served as Professor of Mathematics until his retirement in 1992. In addition to numerous technical publications (relating to differential topology), Dr. Smith has published three previous books and many articles dealing with foundational and interdisciplinary problems. He has been especially concerned to unmask conceptions of a scientistic kind widely accepted today as scientific truths.Wolfgang Smith is as important a thinker as our times boast, and this is his most seminal book. - Huston SmithThe Quantum Enigma is of great importance not only for the philosophy of science, but also for the whole domain of human knowledge, and should be disseminated as widely as possible. - Seyyed Hossein NasrUnusually interesting . . . profoundly enlightening. - Henry Margenau

Color and Light in Nature


David K. Lynch - 1995
    But, how many of us really understand how a rainbow is formed, why the setting sun is red and flattened, or even why the sky at night is not absolutely black? Color and Light in Nature provides clear explanations of all naturally occurring optical phenomena seen with the naked eye, including shadows, halos, water optics, mirages, and a host of other spectacles. Separating myth from reality, David Lynch and William Livingston outline the basic principles involved, and support them with many figures and references. Rare and spectacular photographs, many in full color, illustrate the phenomena throughout. In this new edition the authors have added over 50 new color images and provide new material on experiments readers can conduct themselves, such as how to photograph geostationary satellites with your own camera. David K. Lynch is an astronomer and atmospheric physicist specializing in infrared studies of star-formation regions, interstellar matter, comets, novae, and supernovae. He began his career teaching at the California Institute of Technology and at the University of California at Berkeley. Today, he operates Thule Scientific, a private research institute. He is or has been the Principal Investigator on a variety of NASA, NOAA, NSF, and Department of Defense programs. He lives in Topanga, California. William Livingston has been an astronomer at the Kitt Peak Observatory in southern Arizona since 1959. He helped design and build instruments and telescopes before becoming a solar observer. Livingston has participated in many solar eclipse expeditions in Alaska, the South Pacific, Africa, Indonesia, India, and recently Turkey, but believes that his best sightings of atmospheric phenomena have been from his backyard in Tucson.

Ocean


Miranda MacQuitty - 1995
    Explore the incredible diversity of life in the sea--from the haunting, hour-long songs of humpback whales to the fantastic coral colonies that spawn all their young in a single night.

Strange Worlds Amazing Places


Reader's Digest Association - 1995
    Includes a 29-page gazetteer, over 500 color illustrations--photos, prints, drawings and renderings of 84 places--and a world map and 84 locator maps.

An Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry


Graham L. Patrick - 1995
    But how do drugs have their effect in the human body? How are new drugs discovered and designed to be as effective as possible? An Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry offers an engaging insight into the one field of chemistry that arguably has the greatest impact on our quality of life than any other. Newly structured into four parts, the book opens in Part A with an introduction to pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics. Pharmacodynamics considers the types of molecular targets used by drugs, the interactions which are involved when a drug meets that target, and the consequences of those interactions. Pharmacokinetics considers the issues involved in a drug reaching its target in the first place. Part B goes on to examine the general principles and strategies involved in discovering and designing new drugs and developing them for the marketplace, while Part C looks at particular 'tools of the trade' which are invaluable in those processes. Finally, Part D covers a selection of specific topics within medicinal chemistry. Reflecting a change in emphasis in medicinal chemistry research, this Part takes us from the largely trial-and-error approach to drug design to the rational approach, and explores the most recent advances in molecular biology and genetics which have revolutionised drug design. With a striking new two-colour text design, and greatly enriched learning features, the third edition conveys the fascination of working in a field which overlaps the disciplines of chemistry, biochemistry, physiology, microbiology, cell biology, and pharmacology. A must-have textbook for any student of medicinal chemistry. Companion Web Site - Figures available to download, to facilitate lecture preparation - 3D molecular structures, to enable students to visualise key structures in an interactive way - Multiple choice questions with answers, to support and encourage independent learning

Circle of Seasons


Lucia Monfried - 1995
    Illustrations and simple text celebrate the joys of each season.

For and Against Method: Including Lakatos's Lectures on Scientific Method and the Lakatos-Feyerabend Correspondence


Imre Lakatos - 1995
    'Paul,' he said, 'you have such strange ideas. Why don't you write them down? I shall write a reply, we publish the whole thing and I promise you—we shall have a lot of fun.' " Although Lakatos died before he could write his reply, For and Against Method reconstructs his original counter-arguments from lectures and correspondence previously unpublished in English, allowing us to enjoy the "fun" two of this century's most eminent philosophers had, matching their wits and ideas on the subject of the scientific method.For and Against Method opens with an imaginary dialogue between Lakatos and Feyerabend, which Matteo Motterlini has constructed, based on their published works, to synthesize their positions and arguments. Part one presents the transcripts of the last lectures on method that Lakatos delivered. Part two, Feyerabend's response, consists of a previously published essay on anarchism, which began the attack on Lakatos's position that Feyerabend later continued in Against Method. The third and longest section consists of the correspondence Lakatos and Feyerabend exchanged on method and many other issues and ideas, as well as the events of their daily lives, between 1968 and Lakatos's death in 1974.The delight Lakatos and Feyerabend took in philosophical debate, and the relish with which they sparred, come to life again in For and Against Method, making it essential and lively reading for anyone interested in these two fascinating and controversial thinkers and their immense contributions to philosophy of science."The writings in this volume are of considerable intellectual importance, and will be of great interest to anyone concerned with the development of the philosophical views of Lakatos and Feyerabend, or indeed with the development of philosophy of science in general during this crucial period."—Donald Gillies, British Journal for the Philosophy of Science (on the Italian edition)"A stimulating exchange of letters between two philosophical entertainers."—Tariq Ali, The IndependentImre Lakatos (1922-1974) was professor of logic at the London School of Economics. He was the author of Proofs and Refutations and the two-volume Philosophical Papers. Paul Feyerabend (1924-1994) was educated in Europe and held numerous teaching posts throughout his career. Among his books are Against Method; Science in a Free Society; Farewell to Reason; and Killing Time: The Autobiography of Paul Feyerabend, the last published by the University of Chicago Press.

Intuitive Biostatistics


Harvey Motulsky - 1995
    Additionally, it introduces a broad range of topics left out of most other introductory texts but used frequently in biomedical publications, including survival curves. multiple comparisons, sensitivity and specificity of lab tests, Bayesian thinking, lod scores, and logistic, proportional hazards and nonlinear regression. By emphasizing interpretation rather than calculation, this text provides a clear and virtually painless introduction to statistical principles for those students who will need to use statistics constantly in their work. In addition, its practical approach enables readers to understand the statistical results published in biological and medical journals.

What's Behind the Research?: Discovering Hidden Assumptions in the Behavioral Sciences


Brent D. Slife - 1995
    The text begins with a review and critique of the major theoretical approaches: psychoanalysis, behaviorism, humanism, cognitivism, eclecticism, structuralism and postmodernism. The authors then discuss the key assumptions underlying these theories - knowing, determinism, reductionism and science. They trace the intellectual history of these assumptions and offer contrasting options. The book concludes by examining ways of coming to terms with some of the inadequacies in the assumptions of the behavioral sciences.

Atom-Smashing Power of Mind


Charles Fillmore - 1995
    In it he approaches the spiritual realm from the viewpoint of science. He demystifies the holiness of our relationship to God and the universe and remystifies us by showing us Jesus' teachings as scientific theory: Christianity spiritual interpreted shows that Jesus understood the deeper things of God's universe. He understood exactly what the conditions were on the invisible side of life, which is termed in His teaching the 'kingdom of God' or the 'kingdom of the heavens.'

Force of Nature: The Life of Linus Pauling


Thomas Hager - 1995
    He decried the internment of Japanese-Americans in World War Two, agitated against nuclear weapons, promoted vitamin C as a cure for the common cold and researched the idea of DNA.

The Way Life Works


Mahlon B. Hoagland - 1995
    Full color.