Shipwrecked


Mishka Shubaly - 2011
    There, Mishka Shubaly learned some valuable life lessons — among them that in the absence of whiskey, wine and water, urine will get the job done.

Sean of the South: Whistling Dixie


Sean Dietrich - 2016
    His humor and short fiction appear in various publications throughout the Southeast.

The Last Bus to Albuquerque: A Commemorative Edition Celebrating Lewis Grizzard


Lewis Grizzard - 2001
    20 b&w photos.

Why Dogs Chase Cars: Tales of a Beleaguered Boyhood


George Singleton - 2004
    As a boy growing up in the tiny backwater town of Forty-Five, South Carolina (where everybody is pretty much one beer short of a six-pack), all Mendal Dawes wants is out. It's not just his hometown that's hopeless. Mendal's father is just as bad. Embarrassing his son to death nearly every day, Mr. Dawes is a parenting guide's bad example. He buries stuff in the backyard—fake toxic barrels, imitation Burma Shave signs (BIRD ON A WIRE, BIRD ON A PERCH, FLY TOWARD HEAVEN, FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH), yardstick collections. He calls Mendal "Fuzznuts" and makes him recite Marx and Durkheim daily and befriend a classmate rumored to have head lice. Mendal Dawes is a boy itching to get out of town, to take the high road and leave the South and his dingbat dad far behind—just like those car-chasing dogs. But bottom line, this funky, sometimes outrageous, and always very human tale is really about how Mendal discovers that neither he nor the dogs actually want to catch a ride, that the hand that has fed them has a lot more to offer. On the way to watching that light dawn, we also get to watch the Dawes's precarious relationship with a place whose "gene pool [is] so shallow that it wouldn't take a Dr. Scholl's insert to keep one's soles dry." To be consistently funny is a great gift. To be funny and cynical and empathetic all at the same time is George Singleton's special gift, put brilliantly into play in this new collection.

A Day at the Beach


Geoffrey Wolff - 1992
    He shows us his wildly dysfunctional childhood Christmases—presided over by his con-man father—then shifts to his brash, short-lived teaching career in Istanbul. With dazzling literary agility, Wolff guides us through the surprising, invaluable turns that shaped his path: his victory over the chaos of drink, his open-heart surgery, his life-affirming surrender to the slopes of the Matterhorn, and his transcendent love of family. Long considered a classic, now expanded and back in print after two decades, A Day at the Beach shares Wolff's spirited, elegant, and deeply felt observations on an extraordinary life.

Years of Minutes: The Best of Rooney from 60 Minutes


Andy Rooney - 2003
    Photos throughout.

My Less Than Secret Life: A Diary, Fiction, Essays


Jonathan Ames - 2002
    The entries of this diary are a record of his mad adventures: his ill-fated debut as an amateur boxer fighting as ‘The Herring Wonder', a faltering liaison with a Cuban prostitute, his public outing of George Plimpton as a Jew, his discussion with Eve Ensler about his dear friend The Mangina, a renegade mission as a Jew into the heart of Waspy Maine, and other such harrowing escapades. Whether trying to round up a partner for an orgy, politely assisting in an animal sacrifice, or scamming tickets to the WWF's Royal Rumble for his son, Jonathan Ames proves himself a ballsier Everyman whose transgressions and compassionate meditations will satisfy the voyeur and encourage the halfhearted. But be warned. As Jonathan says, "I don't like to be a bad influence. It's bad enough that I have influence over myself." "...Ames has always been one of my favorite contemporary writers ... for his ... fearless commitment to the most demanding psychosexual comedies."—Rick Moody

Yours Truly


Marieke Hardy - 2013
    At their hugely popular Women of Letters events, Marieke Hardy and Michaela McGuire encourage and allow our best and brightest to lay bare their sins and secrets, loves and loathings, memories and plans. Collected here for the first time, these dispatches from Australia's favourite people are warm, wonderful and astoundingly honest.

The Pet Psychic Diaries


Jeanne Miller - 2011
    Read about Moosie, the horse who hated his name. Zak, the kitty who was being terrorized by a Civil War ghost. Krebs, the blackmailing Sun Conure. Mariah Bayou, a rescued Raccoon and so many more. These readings with our furred and feathered friends illustrate what we have long suspected; Animals have rich and emotional lives that are much like our own. After reading this book, you will never look at your pet in the same way again.

O's Little Book of Happiness


O, The Oprah Magazine - 2015
    Inside you'll find Elizabeth Gilbert's ode to the triumph of asking for what you want, Jane Smiley's tribute to the animal who taught her about lasting fulfillment, Roxane Gay's sure-fire cure for complaining, Brené Brown's celebration of the powers of play, Neil deGrasse Tyson's take on the joyful participation in the universe, and much more. Revisiting fifteen years of the magazine's rich archives, O's editors have assembled a collection as stunning as it is spirit-lifting.

Everybody into the Pool: True Tales


Beth Lisick - 2005
    And then everything changed. Plunging headlong into America's deepest subcultures, while keeping both feet firmly planted in her parents' Leave It to Beaver values, Lisick makes her adult home on the fringe of mainstream culture and finds it rich with paradox and humor. On the one hand, she lives in "Brokeley" with drug dealers and street gangs; on the other, she drives a station wagon with a baby seat in the back, makes her own chicken stock, and attends ladies' luncheons. How exactly did this suburban girl-next-door end up as one of San Francisco's foremost chroniclers of alternative culture? Lisick explains it all in her hilarious, irreverent, bestselling memoir, Everybody into the Pool.Fans of David Sedaris and Sarah Vowell will relish Lisick's scathingly funny, smart, very real take on the effluvia of daily living. No matter what community she's exposing to the light, Lisick always hits the right chord.

Dave Barry Is Not Making This Up


Dave Barry - 1994
    Supreme Court justice shares his remedy for preventing gas ("I had not realized that this was a matter of concern in the highest levels of government"); a newspaper headline in Ohio announces the combustibility of strawberry Pop-Tarts ("A story that can really help you gain a better understanding of how you can be killed by breakfast snack food"); the frightening fact that snakes have mastered the pipelines leading directly to your toilet--and they're not shy ("Many women might view this as a fair punishment for all the billions of times that guys have left the seat up").So get up-close with Dave as he swears to tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth . . . so God help you!

A Wolverine Is Eating My Leg


Tim Cahill - 1989
    Not only has he survived fantastic journeys through the Himalayan rapids, the Grand Terror of Montana, and Dian Fossey's forbidden zone, he writes about them, too. Fearless and hell-bent on destroying all obstacles in his path, Cahill takes us to places rarely seen and barely endured. All admonitions and warnings be damned: Tim Cahill dares us to follow him wherever danger and craziness lurk. And to laugh as he prevails.

Winters' Tales: Stories and Observations for the Unusual


Jonathan Winters - 1987
    Alongside the hilarity are intimate, revealing, and poignant recollections of childhood's pains and lost love, as well as remarkable illustrations from Winters' accomplished, surreal pen.Contents: Unusual stories: Artist -- I miss dancing with you -- Stolen flowers -- Wedding --Hijacker -- Well-kept secret -- Roll in the hay -- Conductor -- Black tie -- King who had to be Queen too -- Face-lift -- Table for two -- Niagara Falls -- Halloween -- Snowman --Old Indian buries an old friend -- Postcard -- My hometown is gone-I mean gone -- Money preacher -- Black lunch box -- Cardboard man -- Fisherman -- Lost valley of the Gods -- Marathon runner -- Campers -- Animal tales: Visitor -- Thanksgiving -- Last day the circus came to town -- My bird doesn't sing anymore -- Did anyone see my doggie? -- Ode to a baby robin -- Ode to a sea gull -- Little bear who didn't know who he was -- Easter bunny -- Bird that couldn't fly -- Stung -- My last flight south -- Faces -- Children's voices: Blinding windstorm -- What do you want to be when you grow up? -- Mirage -- I was behind the couch all the time -- Dr. John Wookey to surgery -- How much money did you make today, little man? -- Little boy's Christmas list -- Baby-sitter and why they're weird or turn weird -- Costume -- What are you frightened of, Johnny? -- Of men and war: Blue Hill massacre -- Rebels -- I want to be a soldier -- Ivy-covered castle -- I stand alone -- Observations: We're going out for two whole days -- What it must've been like -- War paint -- Shadows -- My hobby -- Summer -- My definition of love.

The Book of Eleven


Amy Krouse Rosenthal - 1998
    Forget about Letterman's Top Ten, Amy Krouse Rosenthal's random ponderings on quirky topics are refreshingly clever and zany. Her humor is of the great everyday observational type that everyone can relate to.